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The same, “

“ THE CRONICLE History of Henry the fift, With his battell fought at Agin Court in France. Togither with Auntient Pistoll. As it hath bene sundry times playd by the Right honorable the Lord Chamberlaine his seruants. LONDON Printed by Thomas Creede, for Tho. Millington, and Iohn Busby. And are to be sold at his house in Carter Lane, next the Powle head. 1600.” 4to. 27 leaves.

• London Printed by Thomas Creede, for Thomas Pauier, and are to be sold at his shop in Cornhill, at the signe of the Cat and Parrets, neare the Exchange. 1602.” 4to. 26 leaves.

The same,“ · Printed for T. P. 1608." 4to. 27 leaves.

The Life of Henry the Fift occupies twenty-seven pages in the folio of 1623, viz. : from p. 69 to p. 95 inclusive in the division of Histories. It is divided into Acts, but not into Scenes, and has no list of Dramatis Personæ.

KING HENRY V.

INTRODUCTION.

rial with which he completed in this play the design of which he had the hint from The Famous Victories of Henry the Fifth.*

The dramatist followed the chronicler closely, and in some passages but poetically paraphrased his prose.

Shakespeare's llenry the Fifth was first published in quarto in 1600, but with a text so mutilated, as well as so incomplete, that it is quite impossible to decide by internal evidence whether the manuscript from which it was printed represents, even imperfectly, an early form of the play, or, still more imperfectly, the completed work as it appears in the folio. The quarto edition, among other important omissions, is without the Choruses; but from this no inference can be drawn as to the time when the Choruses were written; for it is manifest that that edition was published in great haste, from manuscript obtained in the most surreptitious and inefficient manner, to meet a demand created by the great popularity of the play ; and from such a copy the Choruses would be most probably omitted, as having neither narrative nor comic interest. The fifth of these Choruses, therefore, which contains lines that must have been written between April and September, 1599,7 is to be accepted as decisive of the date of the production, of the play, especially as it is not mentioned by Meres in 1598, (in the list which includes Ilenry the Fourth, King John, and Richard the Second,) and as it was published in 1600.

The text exists in a very satisfactory state in the folio, which is the only authority for it. The quarto, however, sometimes affords welcome aid in the conjectural correction of typograph. ical errors.

The period of the action is from 1414 to 1420.

* See the Introduction to the First Part of King Henry the Fourth.
+ See Notes on this Chorus.

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} Brothers to the King.

KING HENRY the Fifth.
DUKE OF GLOSTER,
DUKE OF BEDFORD,
DUKE OF EXETER, Uncle to the King.
DUKE OF YORK, Cousin to the King.
EARLS OF SALISBURY, WESTMORELAND, and WARWICK.
ARCHBISHOP OF CANTERBURY. BISHOP OF Ely.
EARL OF CAMBRIDGE.
LORD SCROOP.
Sir Thomas GREY.
Sir Thomas ERPINGHAM, GOWER, FLUELLEN, MACMORRIS, JAMY,

Officers in King Henry's Army.
Bates, Court, WILLIAMS, Soldiers.
Pistol, NYM, BARDOLPI.
Boy, Servant to them. A Herald.

CHARLES the Sixth, King of France.
LEWIS, the Dauphin.
DUKES OF BURGUNDY, ORLEANS, and BOURBON.
The Constable of France.
RAMBURES and GRANDPRE, French Lords.
MONTJOY, a French Herald.
Governor of Harfleur. Ambassadors to England.

ISABEL, Queen of France.
KATHARINE, Daughter of Charles and Isabel.
ALICE, a Lady attending on the Princess.
Hostess of the Boar's Head Tavern in Eastcheap, (formerly Mrs.

Quickly, now married to Pistol.)
Lords, Ladies, Officers, French and English Soldiers, Messen.

gers, and Attendants.

Chorus.

The SCENE in England, and in France.

(6)

THE LIFE OF

KING HENRY THE FIFTH.

ACT I.

Enter Chorus.

CHORUS.

FOR a Muse of fire, that would ascend

O, the brightest heaven of invention !

A kingdom for a stage, princes to act,
And monarchs to behold the swelling scene !
Then should the warlike Harry, like himself,
Assume the port of Mars; and at his heels,
Leash'd in like hounds, should Famine, Sword, and

Fire,
Crouch for employment. But pardon, gentles all,
The flat, unraised spirit that hath dar’d,
On this unworthy scaffold, to bring forth
So great an object: can this cockpit hold
The vasty fields of France ? or may we cram
Within this wooden O the very casques,
That did affright the air at Agincourt ?
o, pardon! since a crooked figure may
Attest in little place a million ;
And let us, ciphers to this great accompt,
On your imaginary forces work.

Suppose, within the girdle of these walls
Are now confin'd two mighty monarchies,
Whose high-upreared and abutting fronts
The perilous, narrow ocean parts asunder.
Piece out our imperfections with your thoughts ;
Into a thousand parts divide one man,
And make imaginary puissance :
Think, when we talk of horses, that you see them
Printing their proud hoofs i'th' receiving earth ;
For ’tis your thoughts that now must deck our kings,
Carry them here and there, jumping o'er times,
Turning th' accomplishment of many years
Into an hour-glass : for the which supply,
Admit me Chorus to this History;
Who, prologue-like, your humble patience pray,
Gently to hear, kindly to judge, our play.

SCENE I.

London. An Ante-chamber in the King's Palace.

Enter the Archbishop of Canterbury, and Bishop of

Ely. Canterbury. My lord, I'll tell you, that self bill is

urg'd, Which in th’ eleventh year of the last king's reign Was like, and had indeed against us pass’d, But that the scambling and unquiet time Did push it out of farther question.

Ely. But how, my lord, shall we resist it

now!

Cant. It must be thought on.

If it pass against us,

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