Report Upon the Condition and Progress of the U.S. National Museum During the Year Ending June 30 ...

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1901
 

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Page 552 - Speak unto the children of Israel, and bid them that they make them fringes in the borders of their garments throughout their generations, and that they put upon the fringe of the borders a ribband of blue: and it shall be unto you for a fringe, that ye may look upon it, and remember all the commandments of the Lord, and do them...
Page 4 - That, in proportion as suitable arrangements can be made for their reception, all objects of art and of foreign and curious research, and all objects of natural history, plants, and geological and mineralogical specimens, belonging, or hereafter to belong, to the United States, which may be in the city of Washington...
Page 269 - Handbook of Plan and Map Drawing; including instructions for the preparation of Engineering, Architectural, and Mechanical Drawings. With numerous illustrations...
Page 185 - ... schists. These schists of which the strike is north and south and which have an almost perpendicular dip, contain fahlbands very similar in character to those of Kongsberg. They differ from those of that locality, however...
Page 185 - It is remarkable that in these mines nickel ores do not accompany the ores of cobalt in any appreciable quantity. The principal fahlband is known to extend for a distance of about six miles, and is bounded on the east by a mass of diorite which protrudes into the fahlband, while extending from the diorite are small dikes or branches traversing it in a zig-zag course. It is also intersected by dikes of coarse-grained granite which contain no ore, but which penetrate the diorite...
Page 250 - Baltimore county. Between 1828 and 1850 Baltimore supplied most of the chrome ore consumed by the world, the remainder coming from the serpentine and platinum washings of the Ural Mountains. After 1850 the foreign demand for Baltimore ore declined gradually until 1860, since which time almost none has been shipped abroad.
Page 4 - Regents to receive them, and shall be so arranged and classified in the building erected for the institution as best to facilitate the examination and study of them; and whenever new specimens in natural history, geology, or mineralogy are obtained for the museum of the institution, by exchanges of duplicate specimens, which the regents may in their discretion make, or by donation, which they may receive, or otherwise, the regents shall cause such new specimens to be appropriately classed and arranged.
Page 277 - ... most of the work can be done by hand-picking beforehand. Before moulding, it must be submitted to about the temperature it is to undergo in the furnace, otherwise it would contract. It is then mixed with a certain portion of less calcined material, which is one-sixth for steel fusion, and 10 to 15 per cent. water by weight, and pressed in iron moulds. If for any reason, either because there was too much or too little water, or because the material was not properly mixed, or contains silica, the...
Page 352 - HUTCHINGS. Notes on the Composition of Clays, Slates, etc., and on some Points in their Contact-Metamorphism. The Geological Magazine, I, 1894, p. 36. H.
Page 296 - Greek a<r/3earos, signifying incombus ible, in allusion to its fire-proof qualities. The name amianthus was given it by the Greeks and Romans, the word signifying undefiled, and was applied in allusion to the fact that cloth made from it could be readily cleansed by throwing it into the fire. As now used, this term is properly limited to fibrous varieties of serpentine. Owing to careless usage, and in part to ignorance, the name asbestos1 is now applied to at least four distinct minerals, having...

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