The history of the rebellion and civil wars in England to which is added an historical view of the affairs of Ireland. [on large paper, cm.24].

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Seite 461 - And because the passion and uncharitableness of the times have produced several opinions in religion by which men are engaged in parties and animosities against each other which when they shall hereafter unite in a freedom of conversation will be composed or better understood we do declare a Liberty to Tender Consciences and that no man shall be disquieted or called in question for differences of opinion in matters of religion which do not disturb the peace of the kingdom...
Seite 640 - He was the first man that declined the old track, and made it manifest that the science might be attained in less time than was imagined; and despised those rules which had been long in practice, to keep his ship and his men out of danger; which had been held in former times a point of great ability and circumspection; as if the principal art requisite in the captain of a ship had been to be sure to come home safe again. He was the first man...
Seite 261 - Is it nothing to you, all ye that pass " by ? behold, and see if there be any sorrow like " unto my sorrow, which is done unto me, where" with the Lord hath afflicted me in the day of his
Seite 461 - King, solemnly given by this present declaration, that no crime whatsoever, committed against us or our royal father before the publication of this, shall ever rise in judgment, or be brought in question, against any of them, to the least endamagement of them, either in their lives, liberties or estates...
Seite 292 - Without doubt, no man with more wickedness ever attempted any thing, or brought to pass what he desired more wickedly, more in the face and contempt of religion, and moral honesty; yet wickedness as great as his could never have accomplished those trophies, without the assistance of a great spirit, an admirable circumspection and sagacity, and a most magnanimous resolution.
Seite 513 - ... there quickly followed so excellent a composure throughout the whole kingdom, that the like peace, and plenty, and universal tranquillity for ten years was never enjoyed by any nation...
Seite 299 - ... but that Cromwell would never consent to it; it may be, out of too much contempt of his enemies. In a word, as he had all the wickednesses against which damnation is denounced, and for which hell-fire is prepared, so he had some virtues which have caused the memory of some men in all ages to be celebrated ; and he will be looked upon by posterity as a brave bad man.
Seite 510 - His single misfortune was (which indeed was productive of many greater), that he never made a noble and a worthy friendship with a man so near his equal, that he would frankly advise him for his honour and true interest, against the current, or rather the torrent, of his impetuous...
Seite 456 - We do believe them to be so vital a part of the constitution of the kingdom, and so necessary for the government of it that we well know neither Prince nor people can be in any tolerable degree happy without them.
Seite 628 - And if he were not the best king, if he were without some parts and qualities which have made some kings great and happy, no other prince was ever unhappy who was possessed of half his virtues and endowments, and so much without any kind of vice.

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