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Fuin,

Finis,

A gem.

Gaelic.
Latin.

English
Focal,
Vocalis,

Vocal.
Foirm,
Forma,

Form.
Foirmal,
Formalis,

Formal.
Foirtil,
Fortis,

Brave.
Forc,
Furca,

A fork.
Fri, Fre, Freth,
Fretum,

A narrow sea,

firth

An end.
Galia,
Galea,

A helmet.
Gall,
Gallus,

A cock.
Geam,

Gemma,
Geanair,
Januarius,

January
Gearun,
Gerundium,

A gerund.
Geastal,
Gestale,

A deed.
Geinadh, gein, Genus,

Generation.
Geinealach,
Genealogia,

Genealogy
Geinam,
Gigno,

To beget.
Geinteair,
Genitor,

A begetter.
Geintilach,
Gentilis,

A Gentile.
Geintileachas, Gentilitas,

Gentility.
Generalta,
Generalis,

General.
Glair,
Gloria,

Glory.
Gloirais,
Gloriatio,

Boasting.
Idhal,
Idolus,

An idol.
Impire,
Imperator,

An emperor.
Impireachd, Imperium,

An empire.
In,
In,

In.
Inirte,
Inertia,

Sloth, weakness.
Inis,
Insula,

An island
Innainadh,
Inanitas,

Emptiness.
Inntradh,
Intratio,

Entrance.
Iodallach,
Italicus,

An Italian,
Iodalt,
Italia,

Italy.
Iosa,
Iesus,

Jesus.
Ira,

Anger.
Indiceachd
Judicium,

Judgment.
Judach,
Judæus,

A Jew.
Jul,
Julius,

July,
Lac,
Lacus,

A Lake.
Lachd,
Lac,

Milk.
Ladron, latron, Latro,

A robber.
Laidionn, laitionn, Latinum,

Latin.
Laidionnoir, Latinæ linguæperitus, A Latinist.
Leabhar,
Liber,

A books
Leabham, Lego,

To read.
Leabhadair, Lector,

A reader.
Leachta,
Lectio,

A reading, lesson.
Leachthoir,
Lector,

A reader.
Leathad,
Latitudo,

Breadth.
Leatadach,
Latus,

Wide.
Legaid,
Legatus,

A legate.
Legaide,
Legatio,

A legacy, embassy

Leigiun,

A legion.

Lis,

Gaelic.
Latin.

English.
Leigiun,

Legio,
Leigam,
Lego,

To send.
Leigal,
Legans,

Sending.
Lco,
Leo,

A lion.
Liabhran,
Libellum,

A little book.
Lile,
Lilium,

A lily.
Lin,
Linum,

Lint, linen.
Lis,

Contention.
Litir,
Litera,

A letter.
Loc,
Locus,

A place.
Locuist,
Locusta,

A locust.
Loigeic,
Logicos,

Logic.
Luacharn, Lucerna,

A lamp
Luan,
Luna,

The moon.
Maighistir, Magister,

A master.
Maighistir-scol, Magister scholæ, A schoolmaster.
Maighne,
Magnus,

Great.
Mailis,
Malitia,

Malice:
Main,
Mane,

Morning.
Main,
Manus,

The hand.
Mainigh,
Mania,

Madness.
Mainister,
Monasterium,

A monastery.
Mamm,
Mamma,

A breast.
Manach,
Monachus,

A monk.
Marmar,
Marmor,

Marble.
Marist,
Maritus,

A husband.
Mart,
Martius

March.

(To be continued.) March 28th 1809.

MILO.

.

Criticism on Exhibition of Paintings by cular notice in your miscellany, which SCOTTISH Artists.

contains so much valuable information

on Scottish affairs. When it is conTo the Editor.

sidered, that such exhibitions have hiSIR,

therto been attempted in the MetroTHE best institutions

for promoting polis only, promoted and encouraged and perfecting the arts, are those by every aid of metropolitan patronage which at once excite emulation, and and opulence, surely the unaided atgive prospect of reward ; which, while tempts of our Scottish artists ought to they minister to fame, diffuse a taste be cherished by their countrymen, and and desire for the productions of ge- their success recorded in our national nius. As I consider an Exhibition of magazine. the works of our artists to be materi Without further preface, therefore, ally productive of those effects, and, I shall now offer you my feeble assistherefore, by its establishment in this tance, in pointing out some of those part of the island, to constitute an æra exhibited specimens, which appear to in the history of its arts, it was with me most deserving of notice. In dosome regret that I saw the Exhibition ing so, I am by no means vain enough of last year passed over without parti- to consider my taste as uniformly cor

rect ;

rect ; on the contrary, I am fully 103. Ditto. A domestic scene ;
aware, that many much better judges effect of fire light.-Extremely agree-
than I can pretend to be, may enter- ably coloured, and with a good effect.
tain very different and sounder opi 2. A. Geddes.- Portrait of a lady,
nions; and I shall be happy if some (Mrs Eckford.)-A clever picture,
more accomplished connoisseur, ex. though on a rather unpleasing blue
cited by my attempt, shall come for- looking ground.
ward hereafter to furnish you with a P. Nasmyth.-Landscape ; a View
detail more worthy of the occasion. I in Westmoreland.-A most extensive
may be permitted to add, however, and grand landscape ; somewhat in the
that though I may be excelled in criti- style of Jacob Ruysdael, painted in a
cal knowledge, I will yield to none in masterly manner, and capitally colour-
the requisites of impartiality and dis- ed. Were we to venture to object to
interestedness.

any part, it would perhaps be to the I shall begin with the portraits : figures on the foreground, which apCATALOGUE.

pear somewhat diminutive. We have No. 129. H. Raeburn. - Portrait of been informed that this picture has a gentleman, (General Maxwell.) - been disposed of for 30 guineas; in An admirable picture, uncommonly our opinion, it is worth 100. well drawn, finely coloured, and a 99. D. Thomson. - A landscape, striking likeness ; the foreshortening with figures.--Most agreeably painted, of the right arm not inferior to Ruo well drawn, and chastely coloured. bens. On the whole, this picture re 153. Ditto. - Another landscape, minds us much of Sir Joshua's celebra- ditto.- We particularly admire both ted portrait of Lord Heathfield, to the style and execution of each of which it would form a not unsuitable these landscapes. companion.

126. Rev. Mr Thomson.-Land. 156. Ditto.-Portrait of a gentle- scape composition.-A clever picture, man, (Dr Adams.)–A dignified and well composed, and ably drawn. striking likeness ; painted in a very

108. A. Carse. - The Wooer's agreeable and grave manner. visit.-A wonderful picture, all things

192. Ditto.-Portrait of a lady, considered, composed with great deli(Mrs Cochran.)-One of the most plea- cacy and judgement, well drawn and sing female portraits we remember to admirably coloured, somewhat in the have seen by this excellent artist. style and manner of Wilkie, our Scots

183. Ditto. -Portrait of a gentle- Teniers. On the whole, this is one of man, (Mr Walter Scott.)—an admi- the most generally and justly admired rable painting, with most appropriate pictures in the exhibition. scenery.

113. Ditto. A country Fair. 144. Ditto.- Full length portrait of There are many spirited and characa gentleman on horseback, (Mr Har- teristic figures, with considerable huley Drummond,)-An excellent pic- mour and perfect costume, in this picture; the horse a capital specimen of ture ; but the effect of the whole is the powers of the artist, in this diffi- by no means so harmonious and pleacult department of the art.

sing as that of the preceding. 1. George Watson.-Portrait of an A. Fraser.-A Green stall.A old Scots Jacobite. An excellent pic. most spirited and excellent picture, of ture, vigorously and harmoniously co- great effect, with much character and loured.

expression, and vigour of colouring. Ditto.-Full length portrait of a J. Howe. A Barber's Shop.-A gentleman, (Rev. Mr Simpson.) A very spirited picture, with much chapleasing picture, of great

effect. racter, and considerable humour. The

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polish

young artist.

polish and finishing of this are not equal worth insertion, I may perhaps trou to some of those we have noticed; but ble you with a few similar remarks u. these are matter of acquirement. pon

the exhibition of last year, in orMuch genius is shewn, both in this der to supply the defect to which I and the preceding picture.

have already alluded ; and I hope you 205. J. Watson.---Lord Lindsay will agree with me in the propriety of and Queen Mary.–A spirited, and annually recording the names of all at same time highly-finished picture, those artists who submit their works much in the style and manner of West- to public exhibition. all, and not much inferior,

I am, Sir, &c. 115. W. Lizars.---Jacob blessing Joseph's children. A

very respectable attempt in the difficult path of Claim by MR WEIR to the Indention historical painting, well composed and

of Rockets. drawn; Joseph's hands executed in an

To the Editor. uncommonly free and able manner; SIR, the general tone of the

colouring PLEASE insert in your magazine too gawdy. But on the whole, this the following facts, that the napicture is highly creditable to the tion may know how far they are mis

informed concerning the invention of W. Douglass.-Several miniatures, the rockets used at Copenhagen, and some of them full lengths; well arrogated by Mr Congreve, and how drawn, and prettily, tho' somewhat the inventor has been neglected. too laboriously finished; particularly Above seven years ago, when the on the draperies and extremities, rumour of an invasion prevailed, I was which give them rather a stiff and urged by a natural impulse to project formal appearance.

a method of warding off, in some deJ. Henning. - Several excellent gree, any attempt of that nature, which drawings, and

medallion portraits, un the enemy might be mad enough to commonly well executed.

make : having digested a plan of deP. Syme.--Some excellent flower stroying vessels at sea, I submitted my pieces, of great delicacy and truth of invention to the examination of sevecolouring

ral gentlemen of Glasgow, of acknowJ. Steele.-An uncommonly beau- ledged abilities, and particularly to Dr tiful and highly-finished miniature of Birkbeck, Professor of Anderson's ina young gentleman.

stitution there, wha pronounced it the S. Lawrence.—A fine miniature of most plausible method he had ever seen à lady, in a slight pretty manner. or heard of. I was then advised to com.

There are many other pictures well municate my plan as soon as possible deserving of notice, but on an occasion to government.

to government. Following this adof this sort, it is impossible to particu vice, I was unfortunate in

my first

apJarize every work of merit. There plication, having written to Lord Mel . are some articles which ought, on no ville, (who I believe was then under account, to have been admitted; and impeachment,) and from whom I receiwe recommend to the committee of ved no answer. It lay dormant till management, to do their duty strictly, December 1804, when I wrote to his and not to give admission to pieces, Royal Highness the Duke of York, which cannot benefit their owners, and submitted to my country my inand only tend to degrade an institu- vention of destroying by fire the enetion which it is of so much importance my's ships at sea. By royal authority to cherish.

my

invention was taken into consider. Should you think these notices ation. General Weensyss ordered me

to

any state.

to come to Edinburgh in January 1805, Government, at that time, was about for examination. I had a letter to Gen. 10 months in possession of my plan, Dirom, who took me to Gen. Fraser; which was again practised at Copenand, as it was adapted for naval purpo- hagen, with little or no improvement, ses, they gave me a letter to Admiral nor does it appear Mr Congreve can Vashon, who desired me to attend next make any. I flatter myself it might day. The Admiral and four other be so improved as to injure the strongnaval officers were present; the Ad- est fleet all the enemies of Britain can miral seemed not to understand it at produce. Tho' Mr Congreve had al. first: Mr Brodie, one of the officers, tered it ever so much, if founded on said, it was a damn'd mischievous thing; the same principle of acting as rockets, and he had not seen any thing of the or fire-arrows, my discovery is most kind : I would to God, said he, we unquestionably prior to his. In jushad had it at Copenhagen when Nelson tice, I claim its merit, though Governcommanded. He took the plan, and ment should deprive me of the reward. was describing its effects to the Ad. It is to be lamented, that Government miral, when another of the officers did not give the merit of it to one took me aside (his name I know not,) who could have more improved it, ratold me it did not belong to a man of ther than have it buried in its original my description to meddle with any

JOHN WEIR. thing of the kind ; it only belonged to No. 11. Brunswick Street, Glasgow, naval people. I told him, I thought

15th February 1809. it the duty of every subject to produce what he thought advantageous for the country, especially in this critical juncture. The Admiral, satisfied with On the advantages of YEAST POWDER. Mr Brodie's description, told me he was afraid it would be dangerous to

To the Editor. use them on board his Majesty's ships,

SIR, for fear of setting fire to them; but he I Cannot forbear to mention a prejusaw how it could be of the greatest dice which has lately presented it. advantage, by having vessels fitted out self to my observation. It exists a. for the purpose, in place of fire ships : mong a class of men, who, from their for attacking forts and batteries he easy circumstances in life, and their said it could also be of very great ad. connections in society, one might supvantage. These were the Admiral's pose should possess a considerable words, in presence of the four naval portion of sound information. These officers. Satisfied with this approba- men are the distillers in Scotland, and tion, I returned to Glasgow, and soon the prejudice alluded to, is the unafterwards I received a letter from his accountable aversion which the major Royal Highness the Duke of York, part of that class entertain against the informing me that my invention was use of yeast powder as a substitute for found not satisfactory. Conscious of common yeast, in fermenting the pot its utility, I sent a descriptive plan of ale, or wash. This yeast powder is it to his Royal Highness, and received merely common yeast, procured at the a very different answer : I had several porter breweries in London, and afletters afterwards from him, (or in his terwards, by a peculiar process, dename) but of little or no consequence. prived of all its aqueous particles, by In November 1805, it was mentioned which means it is brought to a pulveas to be adopted by Sir Sidney Smith rulent state, as its name implies ; in at Boulogne, and, to my astonishment, which state it is not only more portthe inventor said to be a Mr Congreve. able, (one Hhd. containing as much

of

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