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ticular attention to accuracy under the M. Botta, a member of the Legisla. care of an able editor will permit. The tive Body, already known by his Flora number of copies will be limited; only Medicale di Corfu, has just completed in fifty, above the number subscribed for, Italian, the History of the American will be printed ; and as soon as subscri- War. This work, which will form abers for two hundred and fifty, on demy bout six octavo volumes, is distinguish. paper, and one hundred on royal paper, ed for perspicuity, fidelity, and impar. are obtained, the works will proceed. tiality. It likewise possesses the very Great attention has been paid to the rare merit of being written in the purest Chronicles already in progress, by ren. style, and forcibly reminding the lovers dering the stile of printing, paper, &c. of the Italian language, of the beauties harmonious with the old editions. of the writers who ilourished in the age

M. Malte Brun, has issued proposals of Leo X. for commencing a work, designed to A curious discovery has just been contain a General Account of the Pro. made in the archives of the French office gress of Geographical Discovery. It for foreign affairs. It is a MS. history will appear periodically, and consist of of Poland, written in 1764, by command a selection of the most esteemed con. of government, by Father Gouvert de temporary, or late voyages, translated Maubert, a capuchin. This history has from all he. European languages, and been compared with that of the acadeuo published accounts of voyages, both mician Rulbieres; and to the astonisha by natives of France and foreigners.- ment of all, it has been found, that, ex. A subordinate department will contain cept some trifling suppressions, or ada Bulletin of all new discoveries, re. ditions, he has copied a volume and a searches, or enterprises, which may half of his work, verbatim, from Mau. tend to accelerate the progress of the bert. sciences, particularly of Geography... M. Woltmann has published a very It will be illustrated by plates.

interesting and able book, on the hyd. The fourth part of Von Homboldt's raulic works in the territory of Ham, and Bonpland's Travels, will contain, in burg. The author has introduced into two quarto volumes, the astronomical it some new and curious ideas. It was observations, trigonometrical opera. he who directed the new works' contions, and barometrical measures. Mr structed in the port of Hamburg, and at Von H. has thought that it would be the mouth of the Elbe. most satisfactory to give the whole of The Observatory of Seeberg, near the original observations, that it may Gotha, has been placed under the direcbe seen what degree of confidence the tion of M. Von Lindenau, who succeeds results deduced from them deserve.- M. Von Zach : that illustrious astronoThe calculations have been made by M. mer having accompanied the Duchess Oltmanus, from the best tables. The Dowager of Gotha, to the south of Eumagnetical observations, with an exa- rope. The present duke, much to his mination of them, and of those of Cook, credit, is endeavouring to restore that Vancouver, and other able astronomers,' establishment to its former splendor, and by Biot, will occupy the second vo. applying the funds assigned it by lume. As such a number of figures Duke Ernest, to the purpose for which must be a considerable time printing, they were originally intended. M. the latitudes and longitudes of various Schroter, a very able mechanician, has places deduced from astronomical obser- been directed to examine all the instru. vations, have been published in a sepa. ments. The numerous works relative rate tract in Latin.

to astronomy, which formed part of the M. Denis Santi, professor of architec- library of the late duke, have been plature at Rome, has been invited to Paris ced under the superintendence of M. by Cardinal Fesch, who is erecting a pa. Von Lindenau ; among the rest is the lace in the Rue du Mont Blanc. This library of Bernouilli, which has never edifice will be embellished with marble been unpacked since it was purchased. columns, wrought at Rome, as well as Messers Dogen, Busching, and Van the beautiful statue representing the Im- der Hagen, propose to publish in nummaculate Conception, which is to be bers a Museum of the ancient Lan. placed in the chapel.

guage, Literature, and Monuments of

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Poetry

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hts her pure cerulean Dedicated to the Admirersof Thomson

who celebrated his birthday at Ed. ed southland gales de

nam 1809. ring lap a thousand WHEN morning's eye salutes the day,

And orient beams through ether play, reaths on every wood- Diffusing light o'er Albion's isle

Where freedom and the muses smile

With thee, O fancy, let me roam, les, the sailor hastes to

And strew some flowers on Shakespear's

tomb y o'er the ocean swell,

Or through the Leasows let us stray, he tosses on the deep,

Where genuine taste points out the way, honoured with a funeral Along the winding riv’let's side

Where Shenstone's shade still seems to Jarms in summer beauty

glide,
And

musing stand by mossy cell,
heart to love's sweet wil. Where fays and fairies used to dwell;

Or on the banks of Leven's shore
wandering a lone pilgrim

The early fate of Bruce deplore,

And listen to the voice of Spring, d out with passion's wild ex

Where raptured Logan used to sing,

While through the woods of Lomond's vale it on climes of holier mould, The careless cuckoo chaunts her tale are never heav'd, and love is To Tweed's pure stream now let us fly,

And there behold, with gazing eye, atroul'd.

An altar raised by magic power, 09.

G.

Among the trees of Ednani's bower

Where virtuous praise, and artless fame, LINES

Had deep engraven Thomson's name. 2 the banks of the Tay, during Hark!--Tis the sound of heavenly notes, nay evening of January 3. 1809.

From airy harps, which wildly iloats, ails thee my childmah! why do And sweetest strains, to fancy dear,

With rapture charm the listning ear; ý roll with affright?

While dews descend on birchen bowers,
it thus fills thy heart with drend Where Dryburgh rears her ancient towers,
is gloomy,hour of the night? And wafted by the fragrant gale,

Your
other, come forth to the door of poet greets his native vale.

See gentle Thomson's shade appear,
rcot,

With every beauty of the year,
see by the pale moon's gleam,
about rk, on Tay’s billowy Attending graceful in his train.

O'er which his spirit seems to reign,
His voice was music in the Spring,

And Summer taught his tongue to sing,
k, ah! wretched. When pensive Autumn's swelling breeze,

Sigh'd murmuring thro' the waving trees, with the blast; Congenial were the welting lays lili'd with hearts He warbled sweet in nature's praise.

When Winter's winds blew loud and chill,

And clouds incircled Eildon's hill, piercing cry of des. Then Thomson's strong descriptive powers

Pursued the storm through leafless bowers, leparting life. When tempests howled along the plain, La luckless prey

And hoary grandeur closed the scene, strife.

He closed his song, he closed his days,

With pious thoughts, and nature's praise. -oh! mother mother In memory of a Bard so dear

May Scotia, each revolving year,
wly form ;

Attempt, on Thompson's natal day
ore omniscient Heaven 'Some tributary verse to pay.
the storm.
W. M. W.

Hawthornbank, Aug.

ine eyes

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Germany. . The interest of the subject, He fortunately had time to chuse 4 and the talents of the persons concern. worthy assistant to finish his work, in ed in this work, promise a highly cu- Professor Vater, of Halle, to whom Arious and instructive performance. delung's heirs have faithfully transmit

M. Wieland has sent to the press, at ted his manuscripts. Among the mate. Zurich, his Translation of Cicero's Let- rials intended for the second volume, ters, with a Commentary. This public have been found all the particulars concation is accompanied with a preface, cerning the Gaelic language, with which in which the translator developes the Adelung was furnished by James Macmerit and interest of the Letters of the donald; others, relative to the SlavoLatin orator, and the rules which he has

rian languages, supplied by the learned followed in translating them.

Dobrewski; and others on the HungaThe literary world, who have so just: rian language, by Professor Rumi. Uly regretted the loss of the celebrated pon the whole, there is a sufficiency of Adelung, at the moment when he was materials for the European languages, engaged in finishing his Mithridates, with the exception perliaps of the priwil doubtless learn with pleasure, that mitive Greek, on which Adelung's Rethe fruit of his labours will not be losi. searches have not thrown much more His plan was to give an analytical light than those of his predecessors.sketch of ali languages, both ancient The third and fourth volumes will be and modern, divided into classes and fa. occupied with the languages of Ameri. inilies. Death snatched him away, ca, and the South Sea Islands. It is in while the first volume, comprehending this part, as' may easily be conceived, the Asiatic languages, was at press:- that Adelung's manuscripts are most de. Those who have read that astonishing ficient; but the public will learn with performance, for which the author bad

so much the more pleasure, that M. Von engaged the assistance of one of the Humboldt, in order to supply it as much most learned oriental scholars of Germa- as possible, has generously transmitted ny, cannot forbear paying a just tribute to his friend, Professor Vater, all his of admiration, not only to the erudition manuscripts relative to the languages of which it displays, but also to the saga. America. city and discernment with which the Gothe, whose universal genius emauthor has arranged his materials. He braces the widely-extended empire both there gives his opinions respecting the of nature and art, is assiduously engaged origin of the human race, the cradle of in a work on Optics, and will, it is hocivilization, which he places in Upper ped, soon publish the results of his ingeAsia, the languages of the East, &c.- nious researches. The second volume is to contain all the M. Riem will speedily publish his European languages, divided into six

new system of Pasigraphy, or Universal principal families. All that relates to Writing. The only signs which he that which he denominates Celtico-Gal. makes use of are, Arabic figures, and lo-Cimbric, composing six sheets, was two lines, one perpendicular, and the oprinted off before the author's deathen ther horizontal.

Poetry.

AIR,
Sung by Mrs Bland, at the Theatre-Royal,

Drury-lane, in the Traditionary Play of
the MYSTERIOUS BRIDE ; written by

Lumley St. George Skeffington, Esq. BEWARE the found delusion,

Which simple hearts revere,
Nor heed the bold intrusion

Of passion insincere;
Tor hearts may seem expiring

With sighs of deep despair ;

For eyes may gaze admiring

And yet no love be there.
But when the mind resigning

Distinction's flatt’ring state,
Prefers, without repining,

Humility of fate;
When wealth's unbounded treasure

Creates no transient care;
When poverty is pleasure ;

Be certain love is there.

SON

land steep.

SONNET

LINES To Miss WHEN Summer lights her pure cerulean Dedicated to the Admirer sof T homson

who celebrated his birth-day at Ed. skies, And lulls the scented southland gales a

nan 1809. sleep, Flings from her flaring lap a thousand WHEN morning's eye salutes the day,

And orient beams through ether play, dyes, And hangs her wreaths on every wood- Diffusing light o'er Albion's isle

Where freedom and the muses smile

With thee, O fancy, let me roam, Lur'd by her smiles, the sailor hastes to

And strew some flowers on Shakespear's sweep

tomb His loaded galley o'er the ocean swell, Or through the Leasows let us stray, But storms arise - he tosses on the deep,

Where genuine taste points out the way, And sinks: unhonoured with a funeral Along the winding riv'let's sideknell.

Where Shenstone's shade still seems to So shone thy charms in summer beauty

glide, fair,

And musing stand by mossy cell, And wild my heart to love's sweet wil. Where fays and fairies used to dwell;

Or on the banks of Leven's shore derness, Then left me wandering a lone pilgrim The early fate of Bruce deplore, there,

And listen to the voice of Spring, Till wearied out with passion's wild ex

Where raptured Logan used to sing,

While through the woods of Lomond's vale cess,

The careless cuckoo chaunts her tale My spirit light on climes of holier mould, Where sighs are never heav'd, and love is To Tweed's pure stream now let us fly, ne'er controul'd.

And there behold, with gazing eye,

An altar raised by magic power, 7th Sept. 1809.

G.

Among the trees of Ednan's bowe

Where virtuous praise, and artless fame, LINES

Had deep engraven Thomson's name. Written on the banks of the Tay, during Hark!_'Tis the sound of heavenly notes, the stormy evening of January 3. 1809.

From airy harps, which wildly floats, WHAT ails thee my child-ah! why do And sweetest strains, to fancy dear,

Wich rapture charm the listning ear; So wildly roll with affright?

While dews descend on birchen bowers, What is it thus fills thy heart with drend Where Dryburgh rears her ancient towers,

At this gloomy hour of the night? And wafted by the fragrant gale, Oh! mother, come forth to the door of Your poet greets his native vale.

See gentle Thomson's shade appear,
our cot,
And see by the pale moon's gleam,

With every beauty of the year,
Yon labouring bark, on Tay's billowy O'er which his spirit seems to reign,

Attending graceful in his traio.
And list its sad inmate's scream.

His voice was music in the Spring,

And Summer taught his congue to sing, Well, well may ye shriek, ah! wretched. When pensive Autumn's swelling breeze, wretched crew,

Sigh'd murmuring thro' the waving trees, And mingle your cries with the blast; Congenial were the melting lays Hence no buoyant boat fill'd with hearts He warbled sweet in nature's praise. prompt to save,

When Winter's winds blew loud and chill, To snatch from the surge can haste. And clouds incircled Eildon's hill, Heard, heard ye that piercing cry of des. Then Thomson's strong descriptive powers

Pursued the storm through leafless bowers, 'Twas the knell of departing life.

When tempests howled along the plain, All, all are engulph'd! a luckless prey

And hoary grandeur closed the scene, To dire elemental strife.

He closed his song, he closed his days,

With pious thoughts, and nature's praise.Haste we to our cot--oh! mother mother In memory of a Bard so dear dear,

May Scotia, each revolving year, To our cabin of lowly form ;

Attempt, on Thompson's natal day, There humbly implore omniscient Heaven 'Some tributary verse to pay.

For the victims of the storm.
Cupar Fife.

W. M. W.
Hawthornbank, Aug.

V.

thine eyes

wave,

pair?

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