Annual Report for ... with Accompanying Papers, Band 13

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Published for the Iowa Geological Survey, 1903
 

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Seite 306 - ... ranging from a fraction of an inch to more than a foot in diameter, are now standing at every possible angle (Fig. 50). In some cases a certain amount of continuity may be traced from fragment to fragment of the same bed, the pieces showing very clearly that they are the constituent parts of a collapsed arch, but in general the displaced and FJo.
Seite 133 - It consists of a brick-red, granular powder with but little taste and smell. Examined under the microscope it is seen to be composed of small, roundish, translucent grains of a ruby red colour, much resembling (except in colour) the grains of lupuline. Upon showing some of the Wurrus to Mr. Alexander Gibson of Bombay, when he was in London, he immediately suggested that it was the red powder rubbed from the capsules of Rottlera ttnctoria...
Seite 17 - SIB: — I have the honor to present the following report of the work of this office during the year 1902. A complete and trustworthy set of sample drillings from the deep well at the Iowa Hospital for the Insane at Mt.
Seite 53 - Above this point the dip of these beds soon carries them below tho level of the stream. 2, The member of the Devonian series which follows the Productella beds in Howard county is the equivalent of the Acervularia davidsoni beds of Buchanan county. It is made up of a succession of coarse, dolomitic layers ranging from a few inches to more than a foot in thickness. A typical exposure of these layers shown in figure 12, occurred on the north side of the stream, immediately below the mill dam, at Vernon...
Seite 254 - He must be prepared to wade swamps, to ford streams waist deep, or, in times of freshets, to plunge in and breast the current. He must not shrink beneath a broiling sun, without even a bush to cast a faint shadow over an occasional resting-place. He must think himself fortunate if he can reach, at night, a few scattered oaks to plenish his fire, and boil his camp kettle ; and he may consider it a special instance of good luck, if, in return, he can catch a glimpse of a rock exposure once or twice...
Seite 391 - ... by natural strata of not less than one hundred feet in breadth, by which shafts or outlets distinct means of ingress and egress are always available to the persons employed in the mine ; but...
Seite 186 - The drift is of the typical lowan character. It is yellowish brown in color. The iron which it contains is not fully oxidized and the calcareous matter is not leached from the surface. It carries but few pebbles or small bowlders as compared with the Kansan and of these there is but a small percentage of the dark colored trap or greenstones.
Seite 408 - Two fairly distinct types may be recognized; the modified loess-Kansan of the upland and the alluvial of the bottom and "second bottom" lands. The first covers much the greater area, while the latter is the more tractable and may be the more productive. Near the divides the clay constituent may be so great in the loess-Kansan as to render it mucky and imperfectly drained. In such instances the land is cold when wet and tends to bake when it dries, qualities not favorable to the growth of cereals....
Seite 189 - ... materials transported from great distances which the ice left as it retreated. The lowan ice did not generally carry such a large amount of drift and debris as the Kansan, as is witnessed by the comparatively thin sheet of materials which is usually found covering the Kansan drift over the main lowan plain. However, it is probable that the small quantity of ice which melted over this lobe would be one good and sufficient reason for the unusually thin mantle of lowan materials that is found over...
Seite 82 - ... supposed that all three are just alike, just like fifty other such political divisions to be selected anywhere within our valley-prairies. But such is by no means the case. Greater contrasts are not to be found, within the limits of a region not mountainous, than are to be seen within the square before us. We have plains wide extended, so level that for the passing traveler no inequality can be perceived; towns may hail towns across the unbroken fields and houses dot the distant landscapes like...

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