A Treatise on Self Knowledge: Showing the Nature and Benefit of that Important Science, and the Way to Attain It: Intermixed with Various Reflections and Observations on Human Nature

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E.P. Walton, 1819 - 178 Seiten
 

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Seite 100 - And why beholdest thou the mote that is in thy brother's eye, but considerest not the beam that is in thine own eye? Or how wilt thou say to thy brother, "Let me pull out the mote out of thine eye," and behold, a beam is in thine own eye? Thou hypocrite, first cast out the beam out of thine own eye; and then shalt thou see clearly to cast out the mote out of thy brother's eye.
Seite 27 - But now, O Lord, thou art our father ; We are the clay, and thou our potter; And we all are the work of thy hand.
Seite 63 - But the Lord said unto Samuel, Look not on his countenance, or on the height of his stature ; because I have refused him : for the LORD seeth not as man seeth ; for man looketh on the outward appearance, but the Lord looketh on the heart.
Seite 2 - District Clerk's Office. BE IT REMEMBERED, That on the seventh day of May, AD 1828, in the fifty-second year of the Independence of the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, SG Goodrich, of the said District, has deposited in this office the...
Seite 31 - As it is written, there is none righteous, no not one: There is none that understandeth, there is none that seeketh after God. They are all gone out of the way, they are together become unprofitable: there is none that doeth good, no, not one.
Seite 134 - ... diminution of the other. Plutarch has written an essay on the benefits which a man may receive from his enemies ; and, among the good fruits of enmity, mentions this in particular, that by the reproaches which it casts upon us we see the worst side of ourselves, and open our eyes to several blemishes and defects in our lives and conversations which we should not have observed without the help of such ill-natured monitors.
Seite 66 - Woe to him that coveteth an evil covetousness to his house, that he may set his nest on high, that he may be delivered from the power of evil!
Seite 116 - DISTRUST, and darkness of a future state, Make poor mankind so fearful of their fate. Death, in itself, is nothing ; but we fear, To be we know not what, we know not where.
Seite 122 - That before we betake ourselves to rest, we renew and examine all the passages of the day, that we may have the comfort of what we have done aright, and may redress what we find to have been amiss, and make the shipwrecks of one day be as marks to direct our course in another.
Seite 41 - A wise man hath his foibles, as well as a fool. But the difference between them is, that the foibles of the one are known to himself, and concealed from the world ; the foibles of the other are known to the world, and concealed from himself.

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