Journal of the Royal Agricultural Society of England, Band 53

Cover
Royal Agricultural Society of England, 1892
Vols. for 1933- include the societys Farmers' guide to agricultural research.
 

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Inhalt

The Worlds Production and Consumption of Food J P Sheldon
130
Quarterly Report of the Honorary Consulting Entomologist March
132
The Worlds Production and Consumption of Food
137
CattleWeighing Statistics By Albert Pell
144
Agriculture in South Australia By C G Roberts
156
The Cure of Sheep Scab With Two Illustrations
165
TrapPlants for Eelworms By W Fream LL D
173
The Late Sir James Caird By Ernest Clarke
179
The Weather of 1891
185
The Price of Grain in 1891
193
The Price of Grain in 1891
194
List of Council of Royal Agricultural Society of England i
204
List of Honorary Members of the Society
xi
Table showing number of Governors and Members in each year
xx
Proceedings of the Council March 2 1892
xxxviii
Proceedings of the Council February 3 1892 xxi
xlvii
List of Council Officers Governors and Honorary Members
lii
Technical Training of Stockmen By Alfred J Smith 372
lii
Vermin of the Farm With Fine Illustrations
205
The Evolution of Agricultural Implements II 238
238
Desirable Agricultural Experiments
258
Contagious Footrot in Sheep With Eight Illustrations
270
Contagious Footrot in Sheep With Eight Illustrations
276
Variations of the Fourcourse System 291
291
Balance Sheet for 1891 with Statements of Receiptsand
294
The Trials of Ploughs at Warwick 800
306
Wild Birds in Relation to Agriculture
325
Report of the Council to the Anniversary General Meeting of Governors
339
Quarterly Report of the Chemical Committee June 1892
347
Report of the Education Committee on the Uesults of the Senior
353
Report of Rotation of Districts Committee With a Map
363
its Sources and Uses By W Anderson D C L F R S
370
Technical Training of Stockmen By Alfred J Smith
372
Table showing Number of Governors and Members 18891892 xx
lviii
Prizes for Produce at Chester MeetiDg 1893
lxxiv
Proceedings at the General Meeting May 231892
lxxviii
New Modes of Disposing of Fruit and Vegetables Illustrated 689
lxxviii
Allotments and Small Holdings 439
439
Vermin of the Farm II With Three Illustrations
463
The Warwick Meeting 1892 With a Plan
479
APPENDIX
484
Miscellaneous Implements exhibited at Warwick
523
The Farm Prize Competition of 1892 With Three Plans
552
Quarterly Report of the Chemical Committee July 1892 685
585
New Modes of Disposing of Fruit and Vegetables IUus
589
CastorOil Seed in Cattle Foods
597
Recent Agricultural Inventions
625
Officials and Judges at the Warwick Meeting 1892
xcix
Proceedings of the Council April 6 1892 liii
clxii
Field Experiments on the Fixation of Free Nitrogen 051
651
Wild Birds in Relation to Agriculture 325
658
Report of the Council to the HalfYearly General Meeting of Governors
744
Quarterly Report of the Chemical Committee December 1892
752
Report on Experiments on Prevention and Cure of Potato Disease 701
761
The Woburn Experiments on Prevention and Cure of Potato
771
Annual Report for 1892 of the Consulting Chemist
784
Annual Report for 1892 of the Consulting Botanist
792
The Fermentations of Milk Illustrated By J M H Munro D Sc
796
The Growth of Veterinary Pathology
808
The Manufacture of Iron in its Relations with Agriculture
819
Recent Agricultural Publications Illustrated
826
The Microorganisms of the Soil
843
Dishorned Cattle By Albert Pell
851
Statistics affecting British Agricultural Interests 861
861
List of Council of Royal Agricultural Society of England i
cxciii
Wild Birds Useful and Injurious With Ten Illustrations C58

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Seite 464 - Labour not for the meat which perisheth, but for that meat which endureth unto everlasting life, which the Son of man shall give unto you: for him hath God the Father sealed.
Seite 588 - Botanically speaking, the cereal grains of which we have spoken, are true fruits, that is to say, are ripened ovaries, but for all practical purposes they may be regarded as seeds. The fruits, of which mention is now to be made, are those commonly spoken of in our markets, as fruits. First of all, attention must be called to the extraordinary changes in the commercial relations of fruits by two direct causes, (1) The canning industry, and (2) Swift transportation by steamers and railroads. The effects...
Seite 86 - French,) and therefore signifying the court of such petty chapmen as resort to fairs or markets. It is a court of record, incident to every fair and market : of which the steward of him who owns or has the toll of the market, is the judge ; and its jurisdiction r 33 ] extends to administer justice for all commercial injuries done in that very fair or market, and not in any preceding one.
Seite 87 - ... its jurisdiction extends to administer justice for all commercial injuries done in that very fair or market, and not in any preceding one. So that the injury must be done, complained of, heard, and determined, within the compass of one and the same day, unless the fair continues longer.
Seite 204 - Queen's Most Excellent Majesty MAY IT PLEASE YOUR MAJESTY...
Seite 583 - A species, like a carefully laden ship, represents a balancing of forces within and without. Disturbance may come through variation from within, as from a shifting of the cargo, or, in some cases from without. We may suppose both forces to be active in producing variation, a change in the internal condition rendering the plant more susceptible to any change in its surroundings. Under the influence of any marked disturbance, a state of unstable equilibrium may be brought about, at which times the...
Seite 85 - J will tempt me again to quote from this most valuable and unique record : — " And if any default shall be found in the bread of a baker of the City, the first time let him be drawn upon a hurdle from the Guildhall to his own house, through the great streets, where there may be most people assembled, and through the great streets that are most dirty, with the faulty loaf hanging from his neck.
Seite 581 - ... proposed for discussion at this time, namely, can the short list of useful plants be increased to advantage? If so, how? This is a practical question ; it is likewise a very old one. In one form or another, by one people or another, it has been asked from early times. In the dawn of civilization mankind inherited from savage ancestors certain plants, which had been found amenable to simple cultivation, and the products of these plants supplemented the spoils of the cha.se and of the sea. The...
Seite 588 - ... North Carolina that we have in the unutilized mushrooms an immense amount of available nutriment of a delicious quality. It is not improbable that other fungi than our common " edible mushroom " will by and by be subjected to careful selection. The principal beverage-plants, Tea, Coffee and Chocolate, are all attracting the assiduous attention of cultivators. The first of these plants is extending its range at a...
Seite 580 - ... realized rapidly that they become accomplished facts before we are aware. In asking what are the possibilities that other plants than those we now use may be utilized we enter upon a many-sided inquiry." * Speculation is rife as to the coming man. May we not ask what plants the coming man will use ? There is an enormous disproportion between the total number of species of plants known to botanical science and the number of those which are employed by man. The species of flowering plants already...

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