Closing the Books: Transitional Justice in Historical Perspective

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Cambridge University Press, 06.09.2004 - 298 Seiten
An analysis of transitional justice - retribution and reparation after a change of political regime - from Athens in the fifth century BC to the present. Part I, 'The Universe of Transitional Justice', describes more than thirty transitions, some of them in considerable detail, others more succinctly. Part II, 'The Analytics of Transitional Justice', proposes a framework for explaining the variations among the cases - why after some transitions wrongdoers from the previous regime are punished severely and in other cases mildly or not at all, and victims sometimes compensated generously and sometimes poorly or not at all. After surveying a broad range of justifications and excuses for wrongdoings and criteria for selecting and indemnifying victims, the 2004 book concludes with a discussion of three general explanatory factors: economic and political constraints, the retributive emotions, and the play of party politics.
 

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Inhalt

THE UNIVERSE OF TRANSITIONAL JUSTICE
1
Athens in 411 and 403 BC
3
The French Restorations in 1814 and 1815
24
The Larger Universe of Cases
47
ANALYTICS OF TRANSITIONAL jUSTICE
77
The Structure of Transitional Justice
79
Wrongdoers
136
Victims
166
Constraints
188
Emotions
216
Polities
245
References
273
Index
87
Urheberrecht

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Über den Autor (2004)

Professor Jon Elster is the Robert Merton Professor OF Social Science at Columbia University. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Paris in 1972. Before coming to Columbia University, he taught at Paris, Oslo and Chicago. His publications include Ulysses and the Sirens (1979), Sour Grapes (1983), Making Sense of Marx (1985), The Cement of Society (1989), Solomonic Judgements (1989), Nuts and Bolts for the Social Sciences (1989), Local Justice (1992) and Political Psychology (1993). His research interests include the theory of rational choice, the theory of distributive justice and the history of social thought (Marx and Tocqueville).

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