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chatimico's house; thence, up said river, for four miles; thence, one mile, west ; thence, southerly, to a point one mile west of the beginning; thence, east, to the beginning point. The United States promise to guaranty the peaceable possession of the said reservations, as defined, to the aforesaid chiefs and their descendants only, so long as they shall continue to occupy, improve, or cultivate, the same; but in the erent of the abandonment of all, or either of the reservations, by the chief or chiefs, to whom they have been allotted, the reservation, or reservations, so abandoned, shall revert to the United States, as included in the cession made in the first article of this treaty. It is further understood, that the names of the individuals remaining on the reservations aforesaid, shall be furnished, by the chiefs in whose favour the reservations have been made, to the Superintendent or agent of Indian Affairs, in the territory of Florida; and that no other individuals shall be received or permitted to remain within said reservations, without the previous consent of the Superintendant or Agent aforesaid; And, as the aforesaid Chiefs are authorized to select the individuals remaining with them, so they shall each be separately held responsible for the peaceable conduct of their towns, or the individuals residing on the reservations allotted them. It is further understood, between the parties, that this agreement is not intended to prohibit the voluntary removal, at any future period, of all or either of the aforesaid Chiefs and their connections, to the district of country south, allotted to the Florida Indians, by the second article of this Treaty, whenever either, or all may think proper to make such an election; the United States reserving the right of ordering, for any outrage or misconduct, the aforesaid Chiefs, or either of them, with their connections, within the district of country south, aforesaid. It is further stipulated, by the United States, that, of the six thousand dollars, appropriated for implements of husbandry, stock, &c. in the third article of this Treaty, eight hundred dollars shall be distributed, in the same manner, among the aforesaid chiefs and their towns; and it is understood, that, of the annual sum of five thousand dollars, to be distributed by the President of the l'nited States, they will receive their proportion. It is further stipulated, that, of the four thousand five hundred dollars, and two thousand dollars, provided for by the 5th article of this Treaty, for the payment for improvements and transportation, five hundred dollars shall be awarded to Neo Mathla, as a compensation for the improvements abandoned by him, as well as to meet the expenses he will unaroidably be exposed to, by his own removal, and that of his connections.

In testimony whereof, the Commissioners, William P. Duval, James

Gadsden, and Bernard Segui, and the undersigned Chiefs and
Warriors, have hereunto subscribed their names, and asfixed their
seals. Done at Camp, on Moultrie Creek, in the territory of Florida,
this eighteenth day of September, one thousand eight hundred and
twenty-three, and of the independence of the United States the
forty-eighth.

WM. P. DUVAL,
JAMES GADSDEN,
BERNARD SEGUI.

Nea Mathla,

Mulatto King,
John Blunt,

Emathlochee,
Tuski IIajo,

Econchatimico. Signed, sealed, and delivered, in presence of George Murray, Secretary to the Commission. Ja. W. Ripley. G. IIumphreys, Indian Agent. Stephen Richards, Interpreter.

The following statement shows the number of men retained by the Chiefs, who have reservations made them, at their respective villages :

Number of Men.
Blount,

43
Cochran,

45 Mulatto King,

30 Emathlochee,

28 Econchatimico,

38 Neo Mathla,

30

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Oct. 24, 1804. Between the United States of America and the Cherokee Indians.
Proclamation,
May 17, 1824.

DANIEL Suitu and Return J. Meigs, being commnissioned by Thomas Jefferson, President of the United States, with powers of acting in behalf of the said United States, in arranging certain matters with the Cherokee nation of Indians; and the underwritten principal Chiefs, representing the said nation, having met the said Commissioners in a conference at Tellico, and having taken into their consideration certain propositions made to them by the said Commissioners of the United States; the parties aforesaid, have unanimously agreed and stipulated,

as is definitely expressed in the following articles: Cession of ARTICLE. 1st. For the considerations hereinafter expressed, the Cheland by Chero- rokce nation relinquish and code to the United States, a tract of land kecs.

bounding, southerly, on the boundary line between the State of Georgia and the said Cherokee nation, beginning at a point on the said boundary line northeasterly of the most northeast plantation, in the settlement known by the name of Wafford's Settlement, and runing at right angles with the said boundary line four miles into the Cherokee land; thence at right angles southwesterly and parrellel to the first mentioned boundary line, so far as that a line, to be run at right angles southerly to the said first mentioned boundary line, shall include, in this cession,

all the plantations in Wafford's settlement, so called, as aforesaid. l'seful goods ARTICLE 2d. For, and in consideration of, the relinquishment and to amount of cession, as expressed in the first article, the United States, upon signing $5000 to be paid the present Treaty, shall cause to be delivered to the Cherokees, useful nuity.

goods, wares, and merchandise, to the amount of five thousand dollars, or that sum in inoney, at the option (timely signified) of the Cherokees, and shall, also, cause to be delivered, annually, to them, other useful goods to the amount of one thousand dollars, or money to that amount, at the option of the Cherokees, timely notice thercof being given, in addition to the annuity, heretofore stipulated, and to be delivered at the usual time of their receiving their annuity.

In witness of all and every thing, herein determined, between the

United States and the Cherokee Nation, the parties have hereunto set their hands and seals, in the Garrison of Tellico, on Cherokee ground, within the l'uited States, this twenty-fourth day of Octo

ber, in the year one thousand eight hundred and four, and in the
twenty-ninth year of the independence and sovereignty of the
United States.

DANIEL SMITH,
RETURN J. MEIGS.

Tolluntuskie,

Tagustiskee,
Broom,

Tulio,
John McLamore,

Sour Mush,
Quotequeskee,

Keatehee,
Path Killer,

James Vann.
Witnesses.—Rob. Purdy, Secretary. John McKee. Jno. Campbell, Cap. 2d U.
States' Regt. commanding. John Brahan, Lieut. 2d reg't Infantry. Thos. J. Van
Dyke, Surgeon's Mate. Wm. Charp. Hinchey Pettway. Wm. L. Lovely, Ass't.
Ag't. Ch. Hicks, Interpreter.

To the Indian names are subjoined a mark and seal.

TREATY WITII THE SOCK AND FOX INDIANS.

Aug. 4, 1824.

Proclamation, To perpetuate peace and friendship between the United States and Jan. 18, 1825. the Sock and Fox tribes or nations of Indians, and to remove all future cause of dissensions which may arise from undefined territorial boundaries, the President of the United States of America, by William Clark, Superintendent of Indian Affairs, and sole Commissioner specially appointed for that purpose, of the one part, and the undersigned Chiefs and Head Men of the Sock and Fox tribes or nations, fully deputised to act for and in behalf of their said nations, of the other part, have entered into the following articles and conditions, viz:

Article 1st. The Sock and Fox tribes or nations of Indians, by Agreements their deputations in council assembled, do hereby agree, in considera- entered into by tion of certain sums of money, &c. to be paid to the said Sock and said tribes. Fox tribes, by the Government of the United States, as hereinafter stipulated, to cede and for ever quit claim, and do, in behalf of their said tribes or nations, liereby cede, relinquish, and forever quit claim, unto the United States, all right, title, interest, and claim, to the lands which the said Sock and Fox tribes have, or claim, within the limits of the state of Missouri, which are situated, lying, and being, between the Mississippi and Missouri rivers, and a line running from the Missouri, at the entrance of Kansas river, north one hundred miles to the Northwest corner of the state of Missouri, and from thence east to the Mississippi. It being understood, that the small tract of land lying between the rivers Desmoin and the Mississippi, and the section of the above line between the Mississippi and the Desmoin, is intended for the use of the half-breeds belonging to the Sock and Fox nations; they holding it, however, by the same title, and in the same manner, that other Indian titles are held.

Article 2d. The Chiefs and Flead Men who sign this convention, Lands ceded, for themselves and in behalf of their tribes, do acknowledge the lands &c. east and south of the lines described in the first article, so far as the Indians claimed the same, to belong to the United States, and that none of their tribes shall be permitted to settle or hunt upon any part of it, after the first day of January, 1926, without special permission from the Superintendent of Indian Affairs.

U

Annuities, &c.

Ante, p. 84.

ARTICLE 3d. It is hereby stipulated and agreed, on the part of the United States, as a full consideration for the claims and lands ceded by the Sock and Fox tribes in the first article, there shall be paid to the Sock and Fox nations, within the present year, one thousand dollars in cash, or merchandize; and in addition to the annuities stipulated to be paid to the Sock and Fox tribes by a former treaty, the United States do agree to pay to the said Sock tribe, five hundred dollars, and to the Fox tribe five hundred dollars, annually, for the term of ten succeeding years; and, at the request of the Chiefs of the said Sock and Fox nations, the Commissioner agrees to pay to Morice Blondeau, a half Indian of the Fox tribe, the sum of five hundred dollars, it being a debt due by the said nation to the aforesaid Blondeau, for property taken from him during the late war.

ARTICLE 4th. The United States engage to provide and support a Blacksmith for the Sock and Fox nations, so long as the President of the United States may think proper, and to furnish the said nations with such farming utensils and cattle, and to employ such persons to aid them in their agriculture, as the President may deem expedient.

ARTICLE 5th. The annuities stipulated to be paid by the 3d article, are to be paid either in money, merchandize, provisions, or domestic animals, at the option of the aforesaid tribes, and when the said annuities or part thereof is paid in merchandize, it is to be delivered to them at the first cost of the goods at St. Louis, free from cost of transportation.

Assistance to be rendered them.

Payment of the annuities.

Treaty obliga Article 6th. This treaty shall take effect and be obligatory on the tory when rati contracting parties so soon as the same shall be ratified by the Presi.

dent of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate thereof.

In testimony whereof, the said William Clark, Commissioner as afore

said, and the Chiefs and Head Men of the Sock and Fox tribes of Indians as aforesaid, have hereunto set their hands, at Washington City, this fourth day of August in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty-four.

WM. CLARK.

Socks,

Foxes.
Pah-sha-pa-ha (Stabber)

Fai-mah (The Bear)
Kah-kee-kai-maik (All Fish)

Ka-pol-e-qua (White Nosed Fox)
Wah-kce-chai (Crouching Eagle) Peea-mash-ka (The Fox winding his
Kee-o-kuck (Watchful Fox)

horn)
Kah-kee-kai-maik (All Fish)

Kee-sheswa (The Sun)
Sah-col-o-quoit (Rising Cloud)

WITNESSES AT SIGNING.–Thomas L. McKenney. Law. Taliaferro, Indian Agent
at St. Peter's. G. W. Kennerly, Indian Agent. A. Baronet Vesques, Acting S. I.
A. and Int. Maurice Blondeau. J. T. Honore. Jno. W. Johnson. Meriwether
Lewis Clark. Noal Dashnay, Interpreter.

To the Indian names are subjoined a mark and soal.

ARTICLES OF A TREATY

Made and concluded at the City of Washington, on the fourth Aug. 4, 1824. day of August, one thousand cight hundred and trenty-four,

Proclamation, between William Clark, Superintendent of Indian Iffairs, Jan. 18, 1825. being specially authorized by the President of the United States thereto, and the undersigned Chiefs and Head men, of the loway Tribe or Nation, duly authorized and empowered by the said Nation.

Article 1st. The Ioway Tribe or Nation of Indians, by their depu- Lands ceded ties, Ma-hos-kah, (or White Cloud,) and Mah-ne-hah-nah, (or Great to the U.S. Walker,) in Council assembled, do hereby agree, in consideration of a certain sum of money, &c. to be paid to the said Ioway Tribe, by the government of the United States, as hereinafter stipulated, to cede and forever, quit claim, and do, in behalf of their said Tribe, hereby cede, relinquish, and forever quit claim, unto the United States, all right, title, interest, and claim, to the lands which the said Ioway Tribe have, or claim, within the State of Missouri, and situated between the Mississippi and Missourį rivers and a line running from the Missouri, at the mouth or entrance of Kanzas river, north one hundred miles, to the northwest corner of the limits of the state of Missouri, and, from thence, east to the Mississippi.

Article 21. It is hereby stipulated and agreed, on the part of the Payment for United States, as a full compensation for the claims and lands ceded by said cession. the Ioway Tribe in the preceding article, there shall be paid to the said loway tribe, within the present year, in cash or merchandise, the amount of five hundred dollars, and the United States do further agree to pay to the Ioway Tribe, five hundred dollars, annually, for the term of ten succeeding years.

Article 3d. The Chiefs and IIead Men who sign this Treaty, for Acknowledg. themselves, and in behalf of their Tribe, do acknowledge that the lands ment of Indians. east and south of the lines described in the first article, (which has been run and marked by Colonel Sullivan,) so far as the Indians claimed the same, to belong to the United States, and that none of their tribe shall be permitted to settle or hunt upon any part of it, after 1st day of January, one thousand eight hundred and twenty-six, without special permission from the Superintendent of Indian Affairs.

Article 4th. The undersigned Chiefs, for themselves, and all parts Protection of of the Ioway tribe, do acknowledge themselves and the said Ioway U.S. acknow

ledged. Tribe, to be under the protection of the United States of America, and of no other sovereign whatsoever; and they also stipulate, that the said Ioway tribe will not hold any treaty with any foreign powers, individual state, or with individuals of any state.

Article 15th. The United States engage to provide and support a Assistance to blacksmith for the Ioway Tribe, so long as the President of the United he rendered In

dians. States may think

proper, and to furnish the said Tribe with such farming utensils and cattle, and to employ such persons to aid them in their agriculture, as the President may deem expedient. ARTICLE 6th. The annuities stipulated to be paid by the second

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