The History of the United States of America, Band 4

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Inhalt

Renewed Debate in the House British commercial Policy
82
The Molasses Duty the Fisheries New England
89
Limitation of the Duties to seven Years
96
Executive Departments 102
104
Amendments of the Constitution
120
Supplies
126
APPOINTMENTS TO OFFICE FOREIGN AND INDIAN RELA
130
Relations with Great Britain
136
Negotiation with the Creeks
146
Hamiltons Report on the public Debt
152
Value of the Certificates Speculations therein
158
Madisons PropositionDebate upon it
164
Proposed Assumption of the State Debts
171
Antislavery Petitions
177
Report as agreed to and entered on the Journal
203
Renewed Debate on the Funding System
206
Selection of a permanent Seat of Government
212
Revision of the Tariff
218
Army Tonnage Duty Postotlice Appropriations
224
New Constitution of Pennsylvania
233
Political Insignificance of Pennsylvania
240
Relations with the Western Indians
247
Harmers Expeditions against them
248
Debate on the Excise Bill its Provisions
254
Expediency of a National Bank
262
Vermont admitted into the Union
268
Results accomplished by it
274
Arrival of a British Minister
279
St Clairs Defeat
285
Modification of PartiesDivision in the Cabinet
291
Jefferson as a Member of the Cabinet
297
Increase of the Army
304
Militia
310
French Politics Letter from Louis XVI
318
Election of President and VicePresident regulated
324
Presidential Vacancy how filled
325
CHAPTER V
331
Comments on Jeffersons Letter 336
341
Hamiltons View of the State of Affairs
353
Washingtons Attempts at a Reconciliation
359
Relations of Jefferson and Hamilton toward the Press
368
Affairs of New YorkJay and Clinton
376
Second Session of the Second CongressPresidents Speech
382
Reaction in favor of the Government
435
Persistance of Genet
439
Conduct of the Colonial Prize Courts
441
Yellow Fever at Philadelphia
447
Jeffersons Diplomatic Correspondence
453
Madisons ResolutionsDebate thereon
461
Economical and Political Character of the Resolutions
476
British Order in Council of Nov 6th 1793
481
Jayhis Nomination as Extraordinary Envoy
488
Abolition Convention Restraints on the Slave Trade
494
Meeting at Mingo Creek
500
First Convention at Parkinsons Ferry
506
Prompt Response to the Presidents Requisition
510
The Government strengthened by it 516
516
Second Session of the Third Congress Private Claims
523
Dissatisfaction of Jefferson at the Tameness of the Opposition
529
Provision for the Redemption of the Public Debt
536
Special Session of the Senatenew Members
544
Publication of the Treaty
546
At Wilmington and elsewhere
552
Continued public Excitement
561
Attempt to convert the Foreign into Domestic Debt
568
State Action on the British Treaty
574
Land Speculationalleged Attempt at Bribery
580
Cabinet Consultation Presidents Refusal
587
Movements out of Doors
597
Speech of Gallatin
604
The Treaty sustained
615
Contrariety of their Opinions
621
Impressment Poor Debtors
627
Progress and Prosperity of New England
634
Delaware New Jersey Maryland Southern States
640
Morrishis Recall
646
Disapproval by the American Government
653
Acts and Promises of the French Government Jays Treaty
659
Monroes Apology and Vindication
662
Embarrassment of Monroehis Reasons for not resigning
668
Course pursued by Monroe
675
New Complaints by Adet
681
Presidential Candidates
687
Answer of the House
695
Result of the Presidential Election
701

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Seite 368 - I never did by myself, or any other, or indirectly, say a syllable, nor attempt any kind of influence. I can further protest, in the same awful presence, that I never did, by myself, or any other, directly or indirectly, write, dictate or procure any one sentence or sentiment to be inserted in his, or any other gazette, to which my name was not affixed or that of my office.
Seite 363 - The first and only instance of variance from the former part of my resolution, I was duped into by the Secretary of the Treasury, and made a tool for forwarding his schemes, not then sufficiently understood by me ; and, of all the errors of my political life, this has occasioned me the deepest regret.
Seite 610 - No, sir: it will not be peace, but a sword: it will be no better than a lure to draw victims within the reach of the tomahawk. On this theme, my emotions are unutterable. If I could find words for them — if my powers bore any proportion to my zeal — I would swell my voice to such a note of remonstrance it should reach every log-house beyond the mountains.
Seite 203 - That Congress have no authority to interfere in the emancipation of slaves, or in the treatment of them in any of the States; it remaining with the several States alone to provide rules and regulations therein, which humanity and true policy may require.
Seite 200 - ... all men are created equal; and are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights; and that among these are, life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness...
Seite 364 - I acknowledge and avow; and this was not merely a speculative difference. His system flowed from principles adverse to liberty, and was calculated to undermine and demolish the republic, by creating an influence of his department over members of the legislature.
Seite 588 - As therefore it is perfectly clear to my understanding, that the assent of the House of Representatives is not necessary to the validity of a treaty...
Seite 695 - For our country's sake, and for the sake of republican liberty, it is our earnest wish that your example may be the guide of your successors ; and thus, after being the ornament and safeguard of the present age, become the patrimony of our descendants.
Seite 114 - ... 7th. That no commercial treaty shall be ratified without the concurrence of two-thirds of the whole number of the members of the senate; and no treaty, ceding, contracting, restraining, or suspending the territorial rights or claims of the United States...
Seite 360 - ... than has yet fallen to the lot of fallibility, I believe it will be difficult, if not impracticable, to manage the reins of government, or to keep the parts of it together; for if, instead of laying our shoulders to the machine after measures are decided on, one pulls this way and another that, before the utility of the thing is fairly tried, it must inevitably be torn asunder; and in my opinion the fairest prospect of happiness and prosperity, that ever was presented to man, will be lost perhaps...

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