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CONTENTS :

Page

Register of the Weather for June 2. Remarks on the Earl of Selkirk's

1806,

402

Observations, &c,

ib.

High Water at Leith for Yuly, . ib. 3. Eight letters to the Earl of Sel

Description of the View,

403 kiré,

: ib.

Heroic death of Wm. Chalmers at the The Falls of the Clyde,

440

Battle off Trafalgar,

ib.

Memoirs of the Late Dr Chapman, . 404 New Works published in Edinburgh, 444

Query respecting the Phenomena of Scottish Literary Intelligence, ib,

Loch-Ness,

405. Literary Intelligence, English

Account of National Debt, &c. re-

Foreign,

445

deemed, .

ib.

Celestial Phenomena for July, . ib.

Ode for his Majesty's Birth-day, 447

Memoirs of the Progress of Manu.

London. A poem,

ib.

factures, Chemistry, Science, and

Verses on the Death of Edmund Glo.

the Fine Arts,

407

Geographical Queries circulated in

1682, by Sir Robert Sibbald,

The Trial of Henry. Lord Visco

View of the Situation, Trade, &c. of

'Dundee,

Melville, for High Crimes

1 410

Misdemeanours, before the

Journal of the Eruption of Mount

Vesuvius, by the Duke Della Torre, 413 Proceedings of Parliament,

of Peers in Westminster Hall,

4449

465

On the Contrariety between an Au.

House of Lords,

:ib.

thor's Life and Writings,

416

Some account of the late Dr Glover, 419

House of Commons,

ib.

Report of a Committee of the Hor.

ticultural Society of London, con-

MONTHLY REGISTER.

taining a View of Improvements Historical Affairs,

• 473

which may be made in gardening, 420 --- America,

Critical Observations on Home, a General Miranda's expedition to

Poem,

• 423 South America,

474

General result of Experiments made ---France,—Turkish Embassy,

476

on the Temperature of the Waters ---Louis Bonaparte King of Holland, . 477

of the Sea,

-Paris,

479

Manners of the Inhabitants of Indos-

-Treaty,

ib.

tan,

428

Scottish Chronicle,

Defence of the Edinburgh Debating -General Assembly,

ib.

Society,

.. 429 -Civil Appointments,

485

Character of the Heroes of the Iliad -Military Appointments,

ib.

and Odyssey, ..

431

Marriages,

Births,

ib.

SCOTTISH REVIEW.

Deaths,

Pamphlets on Highland Emigration, 433 Prices of Stocks,

I. Strictures and Remarks on the Prices of Grain per quarter Corn Ex-

Earl of Selkirk's Observations on change, London,

... ib.

the Present State of the Highlands Price of Grain at Haddington

of Scotland,

ib. Prices of Meal in Edinburgh Market, ib.

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State

ib.

State of the BAROMETER, in inches and deci.

mals, and of Farenheit's THERMOMETER, in the open air, taken in the morning before fun-rise, and at noon; and the quantity of rain-water fallen, in inches and decimals, from May 26. to June 25. 1806, in the vicinity of Edinburgh.

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29.8

8 52

10 11

W. 9 Th. 10 Fr. 11 Sa. 12 Su. 13 M. 14 Tu. 15

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mJune

10 39 11 39

1

0.051 Ditto

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58

64

1806. Barom. Thermom. Rain. Weather. May

M.

In. Pts. 26 29.9 46 61

Clear 27 29.85 46 64

Ditto 28 29.84 52 go

Ditto 29

53 57

0.1

Rain 30 29.75 53

68

Clear
29.75 46 65

Ditto
30.
51 72

Ditto
30,15 47 71

Ditto
3
29.89
50 70

Ditto
429.65
51 54 0.05

Rain
5 29.2 51

66 6

29.39 50 54. 0.02 Showers 7 29.5 50

0.01 Ditto
8
29.65 53

Clear
9 29.71 55 68

Ditto 10 29.83 59

0.01

Showers 11 29.98 53 63

0.01

Ditto 12 30. 51

бо

Clear 13 30.05 52

81

Ditto 14 30.11

71

Ditto
IST 30,15

72

Ditto 16 30.19 55

68

Ditto 17 30.2 45

Ditto
so
-78

Ditto
19
30.23 55

86

Ditto 2030.24

54
80

Ditto 21 30.1 55

60

Showers 20 30.09 51 63

Clear 23 30. 44

60

Ditto 24 29.81 45 54 0.01 Showers 05 29.75 44 54

Clear

O 10 041

12 I 44 W. 16 2 14 2 44

3 13 3 42 Fr. 18 4 g

5 2

5 28 5 53

6 18

7 8 7 33 8 23

9 14 9 40 Fr. 25.10 5 Sa. 26 10 56 11 22

6 43

Sa. 19 Su. 20 M. 21 T'u. 22 W. 23 Tha. 24

72

7 58

8.48

10 31

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Su. 27

II 47 0.13

M, 28

0 37

71

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18 30.2

Tu. 29 W. 30 Th.31

I 47 2 32

I 9

2 53 MOON'S PHASES.

FOR JULY 1806. Apparent time at Edinburgh.

D. 4. Last Qurtr. 9. f. 5. morn. New Moon,ts. II. 27. even. First Qurtr.22. 2. 28. morn. Full Moon, 30. 12. 47, momo.

M.

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47

THE frontispiece exhibits a view tie, which, at a short distance, falls

of the house of Monzic, in Perth into some very beautiful cascades. shire, recently built by General The woods in the neighbourhood are Campbell, whose ancestor, of the same remarkably fine, and contain some name, distinguished himself so ho- trees of extraordinary height. The nourably in the affair of Darien. whole country round abounds with Before the house runs the river Kel. fine scenery.

Heroic Death of WILLIAM CHALMERS at the Battle of TRAFALGAR. SIR,

T has often been your happy lot « till the firing ceased, then with a

to record the heroic deeds of the 6 feeble voice exclaimed, Could I but sons of the British navy. Such in- live to read the Gazette of this glostances can never be too multiplied. os rious day! and with the remains of Their contemplation delights, they « his breath gave three feeble cheers, animate our hopes in this arduous “ joined by another dying man, and conflict, and hold up glorious models " both immediately expired." of imitation to ages yet to come.

It Genuine constitutional courage is was but to-day that I heard of ano. a rare quality, the inborn attribute ther, and I hasten to communicate it. of freedom, and the companion of The hero was William Chalmers, true piety. It is easy to conceive Master of his Majesty's Ship the that the heat of passion, and the hur. Royal Sovereign, who fell in the ever ry of battle, 'may excite to the permemorable battle off Trafalgar. A formance of actions, which in eooler gentleman who had every opportunity moments could not be thought of of being familiar with the circumstan. without borror; and it is natural to ces, when writing to his friend in Lon- suppose, that when these causes have don, thus expresses himself: “How ceased to operate, and the body lan“heroically our poor friend Chalmers guishes under pain, and the conscious“ died ! His last words, and extraora: ness of inevitable death, that the “ dinary marks of real courage, sur. mental energies should decay as the

pass every thing I have yet heard. frame they inhabit approaches disos Part of his side was carried away solution. All this is consistent with « while steering the ship towards the received notions of animal life.

But “ closc of the action ; he just lived when protracted torture candot exe

tort

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tort a murmur ; when the positive the degree of Master of Arts.

The assurance of death is heard with a eminence with which he discharged smile, and when the last efforts of the duties of the humble office which expiring nature are expressive of joy, he now occupied, soon paved the way contentment and hope, we are lost in for his promction. In 1747, he obadmiration of such intellectual supe- tained the office of Assistant-teacher riority, which the sophistry of ma- to che Grammar school of Dalkeith, terialists will in vain attempt to ex

which had acquired great reputation, plain.

and then was taught by Mr John Mr Chalmers was a native of Shet- Love. Four years after, through land, and fell at the age of thirty-five. the recommendation of the late ProThirteen years of his short life were fessor George Stewart, he was apspent in the service of his country, in pointed Joint Master of the Gram. the respectable situation of master in mar school of Dumfries. His col. the British navy.

AMICUS. league was Mr Robert Trotter, who Edin. 16th June 1806.

being now old and infirm, left him most of the active duty. Here Dr

Chapman taught 20 years, and, unMemoirs of the late Dr. CHAPMAN.

der him, this seminary acquired a re

putation which is not surpassed by THIS eminent teacher, and respec- any other of the kind in this country.

table writer, was born at the Besides public scholars, he kept also farm of Little Blacktoun, in the parish 'boarders; but both these at last inof Alvah, in Banffshire, in August creased to such a degree, that he 1723. The farm belonged to his fa. found it necessary to make a choice ther, and had descended to him from between them. He preferred a board. his ancestors from time immemorial. ing house, which he established on Young George, their only son, re. the other side of the town ; but at ceived his education at the parish the desire of the Magistrates he some, school, then taught by Mr George times inspected the grammar school, Robertson, an excellent teacher, by which was now taught by Mr James whose instructions he profited so Wait, Dr Chapman however was so well, that being sent to the compe. highly satisfied with the merits of this tition for bursars in King's college, teacher, that he thought it unfair to Aberdeen, in October 1739, he gain discourage him by keeping a separate ed the second prize over a considera- boarding house, and generously withble number of candidates. By means drew from the competition. He then of the bursary which this afforded, he returned to the neighbourhood of was enabled to study the languages Banff, and took possession of the farm and philosophy for four successive which had been held by his father, winters. Here he met with the en- keeping at the same time a small acatire approbation of his instructors, demy. Some time after, however, he and formed, with Professor Rait in let the farm advantageously, and was particular, an intimacy which lasted invited by the Magistrates of Banff till his death. He then went into to superintend the grammar school the family of a Mr Stewart, by whose of that city. With their approbation recommendation, on the resignation he converted it into an academy, and of Mr Robertson, he was appointed appointed such as he knew to be skil. to his own parish school of Alvah. fül teachers. About the same time, Being allowed to employ a substitute the Magistrates of Banff having formin winter, he completed his education cd the benevolent design of establishar Aberdeen, and in April 1741 took ing an iostitution for the instruction

and

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