Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
EPUB

mense value is, that the rents have not Sir Archibald Primrose, Bart. of Duni. been raised these sixty years; the good pace. old Lady not wishing to raise theni, as her Aug: 5. At Helensburgh, the Rev. James brother had adopted that line of conduct; Steven, of Glasgow. and at this moment, if re-let, it is supposed 5. At Swansea, in Wales, suddenly, the the annual revenue would not be less than Earl of Llandaff. His Lordship was in so ocol. Few deaths have happened, that perfect health the evening before, out will be more generally felt and regretted walking, and enjoying the beauties of the than that of this excellent woman. In her, romantic scenery in the neighbourhood the poor have lost a benefactress, whose of Swansea. He had also bespoke a play boundless stores were ever open to their for the following evening. In the interim Telief. Though a retired, and in many he was found dead in his bed. respects singular character, few were more Sir John Chardin Musgrave, Bart. of generally respected; and constantly sur- Eden Hall. rounded by her friends, she passed her life 3. At Coniston, Miss Smith, daughter of in the exercise of those christian and social George Smith, Esq. of Coniston. virtues, which gave a lustre to riches, and 12. At Beckenham, Kent, deeply laadd dignity to hospitality.

mented, the Right Hon. Dowager Lady Aug. 1. Mr Robert Brown, schoolmaster Dacre, relict of Thomas Barrett Lord of Stevenston, Ayrshire, in the 85th year Dacre, of Belhouse, Essex, and sister to of his age, and 58th of his office as a pa- the late Earl Camden. rochial teacher. He was an honest man, 13. At Dundee, Miss E. C. Mylne, a kind neighbour, and a diligent teacher. daughter of the late Thomas Mylne of

2.At Edinburgh, Miss Hay, daughter of Mylnefield, Esq. the deceased George Hay, Esq. of Mount- 17. At Sanson House, Miss Jane Dunblairy.

das, youngest daughter of Lieut.-General 3. At Long Hermiston, Mr John Hill, Francis Dundas, farmer and an eminent horee dealer.

19. At Edinburgh, Alexander Wolfe Law, s. At the Hermitage, near Leith, Mrs infánt son of Mr James Law, surgeon. Fleming Primrose, daughter of the deceased

Bank

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

61 2

Price of Stocks.

Prices of Grain at Haddington. 3 per cent

1806. | Wheat. / Barley. | Oats. / Pease 1806. Stock. Omnium. Consols.

8. d.

s. d. Aug. I.

26 o 43.0

21 O Aug. 4.214

21 12 pr. 66 ;

8.
41 O

27 O 20 | 21 8.214 151101 164 2

15.
41 0

210 22 15.214 54 61 2

22. 42 o

21 O 22 22.2141 'fii

Prices of Oat, Pease, and Barley Meal, in Prices of Grain per quarter, Corn Exchange,

Edinburgh Market, per Peek.

Pease & Barley 1806. Oatmeal.

Meal. 1806. Wheat. Barley Oats. Pease.

Bolls. Price. Bolls. ( Price." d. d.

d. d. Aug. 4. 74 86 | 30 38 | 22 30 60 64 Aug. s. 376 18 171

13 IT II. 30 37 22 30 | 66 70

I 2. 220

62 13 II 18. 1.70 81 30 38 22 29 | 66 72 19. 370

18 172 87

13 25. 1 70 80 | 30 37 | 20 27 | 66 72 26. 240

48 13

London,

S.

[ocr errors]

s.

[ocr errors]

70 80

18 19

18 17

I 11

Errata.-P. 423. col. 2. lire 17. for for, read far, 426, c. 1. 1. 2. for are read is.

508, c. 2. l. 5o. for The read One. 509, C. 1. l. 44. for justly, read just. Ib. c. 2. 1. 15. for could, read would. Jb. c. 2. 1. 3c. for power, read poem. 510, c. 1. 1. s. insert a. Ib. c. 1. 1. 7. for but, read and. Ib. c. 2. 1. 27. insert at. P. 469, c. 1. 1. 36. for 510l. per annun, read 150l. per annum.

[ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors]

State of the BAROMETER, in inches and deci.

mats, and of Farenheit’s THERMOMETER, in the open air, taken in the morning before sun-rise, and at noon; and the quantity of rain-water fallen, in inches and decimals, from August 26. to Sept. 25. 1806, in the vicinity of Edinburgh.

9 14

Shower

47

High Water at LEITH. For OCTOBER 1806.

Morn. Eveo. Days. H. M H. M. W. 1 4 35 5 1 Th. 2 5 28 5 55 Fri 3 6 23 6 51 Sa. 4 7 20 7 49 Su. 5 8 18 8 46 M, 6

9 42 T'u. 7 10 10 10 37 W. 8 11 4 11 30 Th. 9 11 57 Fr. 10

0 23 0 49 Sa. 11

1 15 1 42 Su, 12 2 8 2 35 M. 13 3 2 3 29 Tu. 14 4 2 4 35 W. 15

4 57 5 20 Th. 16 5 47 6 14 Fr. 17 6 40 7 6 Sa. 18 7 30 7 55 Su, 19 8 18 8 42 M. 20 9 4 9 27 Tu. 21 9 48 10 10 W. 22 10 30 10 52 Th. 23 11 12 11 33 Fr. 24 11 54 Sa. 25 0 16 0 38 Sü, 26 1 0 1 23 M. 27 1 46 2 10 Tu, 28 2 35 3 2 W. 29 3 28 3 56 Th. 30 4 23 4 52 Fr. 31 5 20 5 49

51

Clear

1806. Barom. Thermom. Rain. Weather. August

M. N. In. Pts. 26 29. 51 67 0.25 Rain 27 29.1 53 62 0.01 28 29.23 53 61 0.01

Ditto 29 29.2 50 52 0.42 Rain 30 29.28 49 60

Clear 31 29.25 49 59 0.51 Rain 1 29.11

45
65 0.03

Shower 22 29. 25

64

0.02 Ditto 3 29.3

55 0.03 Ditto 4 29.41 48 59 0.15 Rain 5 | 29.5 47 65 6 29.65 54

64

Ditto hry 29.5 55

63

0.09 Rain
8 29.4

65
0.03

Shower 9 29.42 43 64 0.02 Ditto

29.45 48 66 0.03 Ditto

29.6 48 60 0.01 Ditto 12 30.09 48 60 0.08 Rain 13 30. 45 60

Cloudy 14 30.08 45 59

Ditto 15 30.07 -40 60

Clear 16 30. 46 61

Ditto 17 30.1 44 65

Ditto 18 | 29.95 55 60 0.02 Shower 19 | 30. 47 60

0.01 Ditto 20 29.9

64 0.02 Ditto 21 | 29.5 52 63

0.05 Rain 22 | 29.65 49

0.31 Ditto 23 29.9 43 62

Clear 24 30. 42 63

Ditto 25 30. 4:4 59 0.01 Shower

53

10 11

57

57

MOON'S PHASES.

For OCTOBER 1806. Apparent time at Edinburgh.

D.

H. M Last Qurtr. 5. 7. 45. morn. New Moon, 11, 11. 37. even. First Qurtr. 19. 10. 27. morn. Full Moon, 27. 11. 31. mern.

Quantity of Rain 2,11

October 11. Old Michaelmas.

23. Irish rebellion, 1641.
25. St Crispin.
25. King Geo. III. accession. (1760.)
26. King Geo. III. proclaimed.,

THE

[ocr errors]

THE

Scots Magazine,

AND

EDINBURGH LITERARY MISCELLANY,

For SEPTEMBER, 1806.

Description of the View.
T 'HIS is a very noble and extensive edifice was erected. This is the more

edifice. It is romantically situated probable, when it is considered, that on a peninsula, at the junction of the the present castle was built by one Teith and Ardoch, to the south-east of the Earls of Monteith, at a time of the town, commanding a full view when Monteith was a lordship of reof the Teith and bridge, and sur. gality : It is natural to presume, that rounded with groves and verdant the family would have called the edi. fields. Nature has pointed out this fice the Castle of Monteith, after the spot as a place of strengih, at least lordshipto which it belonged; but have well suited to the art of war in an- ing called it Doune, we may suppose cient times; and it is more than that this was the ancient name of the probable, that, at an early period, spot whereon the building was erecto this spot was occupied by some for-, ed It is the property of the Earı tification, long before the present of Moray.

[ocr errors]

Sketch of the Life and Character of Mr Fox.
AT

T six o'clock on Saturday after- instance, with that firm tranquillity of

noon, September 13. this great spirits which was characteristic of and illustrious Statesman yielded his his nature, and which he maintained last breath in the arms of his nephew, to the last. Lord Holland. His dissolution was Perhaps there never was a man so gradual, and accompanied by so with whose conduct and principles little struggle, as scarcely to permit the nation at large has been so unithe most anxious eye to ascertain the versally and so intimately acquainted instant. His friends bad at least the as the great man whose lamented sad and melancholy consolation of death we have now to record. The perceiving that he suffered no pain— superiority of his talents-their powerand they had been prepared for the ful and frequent adaptation to popu. event by the unerring symptoms of ex- lar purposes his representation of haustion that had increased for the the populous, and, in some measure, two days preceding. On Friday, at Metropolitan City of Westminster, noon, the physicans announced to where he necessarily lived and acted him the approaching close, and he re- in the bosom of his constituents-his ceived it, as he had done in the first easiness of access his pleasant social

а

spirit.. his friendly disposition and Treasury to be made out, in which conciliating manners. the candour I do not see your name. which appeared in all he said, and

(Signed), "NORTH."! the good nature which predominated Mr Fox now, entered the lists of in all he did, were qualities which Opposition, and throughout the rendered him, as it were, a personal whole of the American War proved acquaintance of the country; and of most powerful, antagonist to the all political men the best known to Ministers of that period. On the the people.

downfal of Lord North he, was ap, Mr Fox was the second son of pointed one of the Secretaries of Henry, the first Lord Holland, and (State, which situatia he resigned was born Jan. 13, 0. S. 1749. Eton on the death of the Marquis of was the place of his education, and Rockingam, when the Earl of Shelwhile he was there he gave a pro- burne, since created Marquis of Lansmise of those talents which has been down, was appointed to suceeed bin, since so amply fulfilled. From On the dissolution of that short-liv, thence he proceeded to Oxford, where ed Administration, he formed the he resigned his classic pursuits to Coalition with Lord North, and re. dramatic literature. It has been said, sumed his former,

office. He that during his residence at Oxford he brought in his India Bill, which, af, read every play in the English lan- ter having passed the House of Com. guage. He finished his education by mons, was unexpectedly thrown out the usual tour through Europe ; and by the House of Lords, and occa. on his return to England, was elected sioned the resignation of the Minise into Parliament for Midhurst, a con- try,

of which he formed a part. siderable time before he was of age ; Mr Fox accordingly resumed bis when he became the champion of powerful station on the Bench of Ministers, voted against the Middle Opposition, The Regency, the sex Election, and the first Speech trial of Mr Hastings, and above all, he made in Parliament was against the French Revolution, and its req Mr Wilkes.

lative effects to this country, gave He was appointed a Lord of the ample opportunity to display his ta. Admiralty, resigned in disgust, was lents and eloquence, both of which a second time appointed, and after. he continued to display against the wards removed to the Treasury Administrations-of- MrPitt, with Board, from whence he was dismiss- the intervention of the period when ed ; and all these political vicissitudes he thought proper to secede from befel him before he had completed his Parliamentary duty. The death his 25th year. It may also be add- of that Minister occasioned his secal ed, as an unexampled circumstance to power. in the career of politics, that, before Of his eloquence and debating he had attained the age of twenty powers, it is not easy to speak ia four years, he was the ablest sup. terms that can convey an adequate porter of the Minister throughout idea of them. His speeches may be a whole session : and, in the course considered as amongst the finest ex, of the succeeding year, one of his amples of argumentation, abounding inost powerful and dangerous oppo. in pointed observations and just con, nents.His sudden removal from the clusions, clothed in forcible expres. Treasury Board was announced to sion, and delivered with manly bold. him in the following laconic epistle :: The leading characteristic of

“ His Majesty has thought pro- his oratory was a ready, and, as it per to order a new Commission of vere, intuitive power of analysis,

ness.

« ZurückWeiter »