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proposed by Sir Francis Burdett. For boriously to writing, for the purpose of the first eight days the latter candidate iusinuating pollution into the minds of was considerably a-head of Mr Sheri. unknown and unsuspecting readers. It dan. But an union having taken place seems to be his (Mr Moore's) aim, to between the Baronet and Mr S. by impose corruption upon his readers, by which it was agreed that the friends of concealing it under the mask of refineeach should vote for the other, Mr She- ment. It is doubly necessary to put ridan was at length successful, and at the the law in force against this delinquent, final close of the poll on the 15th day, since he has not only indicated a dispothe numbers stood as follow :-For Sir sition to do mischief, but seems unfor. Samuel Hood 5478, Mr Sheridan 4753, tunately to have found an opportunity." Mr Paul 4481. Whereupon the High The Reviewer concludes, “Such are the Bailiff declared the two former duly e. demerits of this work, that we wisb to lected. Mr Paul demanded a scrutiny, see it consigned to universal reproba. which the Bailiff refused, as the time tion.” fixed for niaking the return would not Mr Moore took offence at this cri. permit it. On this occasion, the speeches tique. He accordingly sought the aufrom the hustings abounded in violence, thor; and Mr Jeffrey, then in London, personality, and invective. The expence came forward boldly, and avowed himto some of the candidates amounts to self the writer of the article A chal. an enormous sum, to defray which, their lenge was the consequence; and the friends have opened subscriptions. parties agreed to meet at Chalk Farm,

The Duke of Queensberry has sent a a place not less famous for duels, than draft on his banker for a thousand Parnassus for poetry, when they were pounds to Mr Sheridan's Committee, apprehended. in aid of the-fund opened to defray the On Sunday, Oct. 12. a duel was expence of that gentleman's election. fought at Mount Edgecumbe by Mr

On Monday morning, Aug. 11. two Armstrong, midshipman of the Prince gentlemen met at Chalk Farm, near of Wales, and Mr Long, midshipman of London, with an intention to fight a the Resistance frigate, in which the lat. duel, when they were immediately seiz- ter was killed on the spot. His antagoed by three Bow-street officers, disarın. nist and the seconds left him immedi. ed, and carried before Justice Read, at ately after the fatal shot was fired, but the Police office, who admitted them to they have all been apprehended. bail to keep the peace, theniselves in On Thursday, Nov. 13. a duel was 4ool. each, and two sureties in 200l. fought near Limerick, between Captain each. The parties were Francis Jeffrey Beeves, of the 69th regiment, and Capt. Esq. Advocate, of Edinburgh, and Thos. B. of the 6th West India regiment.Moore, Esq. known by the appellation The former, at the first fire, received a of Anacreon Moore.-The cause of the mortal wound, and died on the Tuesday meeting is stated to be as follows:

following The Edinburgh Review, in its num. On Tuesday, Nov. 19. a duel took ber for July last, devoted its eighteenth place near Gosport, between Mess. Ott. article to a volume 4to. of Epistles, ley and Connell, first and second LieuOdes, and other Poems, published by tenants of his Majesty's ship Chichester, Thomas Moore, Esq. Among the nu. now repairing at said place; when the merous observations upon this new former was shot through the head at the work of the author, we find the follow. first fire, and expired on the spot. Mr ing:

Connell and the seconds have decam ped. “ There is nothing, it will be allow- On Tuesday night, the house of Col, ed, more indefensible, than a cold-blood. John Bannerman, in Gloucester place, ed attempt to corrupt the purity of an London, was broken open, and rehbed innocent heart; and we can scarcely of jewels and plate to the amount of be.conceive any being more truly despicás tween Two and Three Thousand Pounds, ble than he who, without the apology of The robbery being very mysterious, all unruly passion, or tumultuous desires, the servants were exammed by Justice sits down to ransack the impure place of Bond, when the circumstances against his memory for inflammatory images the under butler were so strong, that and expressions, and commits them la- he was detained in custody,

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Trial of the Hon. ROBERT JOHNSON, one common pain he had to disclose to their at

of the Judges of the Court of Common tention, a case of the most singular and hi.
Pleas in Ireland, for a Libel, before the deous description. He had to bring before
Court of King's" BENCH, and a Sperial them this day a Judge of the Empire, one
Jury, on Saturday, November 23. 1805. of his Majesty's Judges, charged with an

offence of the most mean species, that of MR Abbot opened the pleading, by stat- being the concealed and anonymous author

ing, that this was an indictinent against of a libel against the Government of his the Hon. Judge, charging, that he wickedly

country. He should have thought that a contriving to bring his Majesty's Govern- Judge of the Court of Common Pleas in ment in Ireland into contempt and disre- Ireland would have regarded his high rank pute, and to cause it to be believed by all

and station more; that he would have been the King's subjects, that Lord Hardwicke more sensible of, and more alive to, all the was an unfit person to govern that part of dignity of his exalted station, than meanly the United Kingdom- the Lord Chancellor

to dip his hands in the vile gall, of which Redesdale corrupt in his office-Mr Justice the libel he charged him with was so reOsborne ready to second every act of injus- markably characteristic. He then proceedtice on the part of the Irish Government- ed with much force and ability to enlarge and Mr Marsden, the Under Secretary of upon the extreme impropriety of a man in State, a person equally venal-did publish the situation of a Judge, reviling, by the in a certain publication, called “ Cobbett's foulest libel, that Government it was his Weekly Register,” a libel signed Juverna. duty and interest to have supported. He

It was ushered in by a quotation from paid the highest compliments to the characLaocoon's address to the Trojans, in the ter of Lord Hardwicke and the Lord ChanÆneid of Virgil, “ Equo ne credita teneri," cellor Redesdale, both of whom he describand by referring to the wooden horse intro- ed to be as superior to his eulogy as they duced by the Grecians into the city of were to the malice of the defendant. Of Troy; comparing that wooden machine

the publication itself, he thought it unnewith the head of Lord Hardwicke, which, cessary to argue on its libellous tendency; though apparently innoxious, contained se- it was so obvious, that he was persuaded cret mischief, and the means of destruction his Learned Friend, who had the defence of to the people. It then went on to revile the Learned Judge, would not attempt to his Lordship as a breeder of sheep in Cam. justify it. The only question then would bridgeshire; as well as the Lord Chancel- he, whether it had been published by the Yor, whom it styled a stout built Chancery defendant? This would be proved by the Pleader. It also accused his Lordship of evidence of the manuscript itself, which transferring the fees of the office of the had been given up by Mr Cobbett, upon Master of the Rolls to his own; it drew his conviction as the publisher.-The moan invidious comparison between the late nient the original writing was in the hands Lord Kenyon and Judge Osborne, to the of the officers of the Crown, they set about prejudice of the latter, whom it charged endeavouring to discover whose it was, with having first corrupted the heart of and it had been ascertained by the unithe late Mr Emmett, and lashed with a form and positive opinion of four gentlespeech to evidence the dying son of his men, that the style and character of it friend, who had made no defence. It also was that of the defendant. One of these accused Mr Marsden of participating in ail persons, Mr Waller, was the Solicitor to a the peculations of the Government of Ire- Board of Revenue in Ireland, at which the Jand.

defendant, Mr Johnson, had for many years The Atterney-General then addressed acted as an Assistant Barrister; in this cache Jury in a speech of great length. He pacity, he of course became intimately acset out with observing, that it was with un. quainted with his hand-writing, continually

being in the habit of seeing his written opi

nions, as well as his notes and letters, which, This highly interesting and important as a Member of the Irish Parliament, he case would have appeared sooner in our franked. The other witnesses, three in Miscellany, but was reserved until the Hon. number, were, from their official situations, Defendant should be brought up to receive equally able to speak with certainty to the the sentence of the Court, in consequence fact. If this was made out, the province of the verdict of Guilty being found against of the Jury would be at an end, as they him by the Jury. We have however late- would have no alternative but that of find. ly learnt, that all further proceedings against ing such a verdict as would transfer to the him have been quashed, and that he has Court the power of punishing the libel as been allowed to retire from office, with a it justly merited. pension of L.1300 a year.

Mr White, the Solicitor for the Treasury, Dec. 1806.

pros

produced the two letters given up by Mr high situation of public trust and confidence Cobbet. One was dated the 29th of Octo- he had held. Afiictive indeed would it be ber, and the other the 28th of November, to such a man, whose whole time and atten1803, and they were both signed Juverna. tion had been devoted to the support of

Mr Cobbett was then examined: he the Government and Constitution of the stated, that in 1803 he received a letter, country, and the laws, in the administration with the Irish post-mark on it, from Mr of which he had been so materially con. Budd, of Pall Mall, where at that time all cerned, to have it recorded of him that he communications for his Weekly Register had been guilty of so malevolent an act, as were addressed, enquiring whether it would that of sending into the world an anony: be agreeable to him to receive from Ire- mous libel, to destroy the fame of the imland some useful and true information re. mediate representative of the King, vilify specting public affairs there; and if so, he the first Law Officer of the country, reflect was desired in his next number to state upon the honour and character of a brother where such communications were to be ' Judge, and by the general scope and ten. sent, and Mr C. accordingly intimated that dency of the publication, to excite a spirit of they should be addressed to Mr Budd, No. discontent and disaffection to his Majesty's 100, Pall Mall. The letters, the subject Government, and the eminent persons enof the present indictment, soon arrived, and trusted by him with the higher functions of were accordingly published soon thereafter. the State. If the Crown had produced four The libel, signed Juverna, was one of witnesses, who, speaking only of their know. them. The manuscripts he preserved, but ledge of the defendant's hand-writing, five the envelopes in which they were sent, he or six years ago, conceived that the manubelieved, were destroyed, at least he had script was written by him, he should, in opnever been able to find them. He admitt. position to their testimony, produce more ted that he had never sent to the printer than an equal number of witnesses, who for them, and upon that omission a point had been the intimate friends of the defenwas saved to be hereafter determined. dant during the whole of his life up to the

Mr Richard Waller stated, that he had present moment, who were as well acquaintfrequent and repeated meetings with the ed with the character of his hand-writing defendant; he often received writings from as with his features. These persons would him, and had seen him write ; he knew his state that the libel, instead of being the hand-writing perfectly, at least as well as production of the defender's pen, had not that of any other man, and, to the best of the least resemblance to his manner of writhis belief, he swore to tbe two letters shown ting. him as the hand-writing of Mr Justice The first witness for the defendant was Johnson.

Sir Richard Deb, a medical gentleman, who Mr Charles Ormsby, who had known said he had been intimately acquainted with the defendant 20 years, stated, that he had him for upwards of thirty years

. He look. many opportunities of seeing the defendant's ed at the manuscripts of the libel in queswriting on franks, in opinions and amended tion, and declared they were totally unlike pleadings, when he was Counsel for the the hand-writing of the defendani-there Revenuc Board. He had seen the libels was not the least similitude. On the crosstwelve months ago, and believed they were examination of this witness, it appeared, the writing of the defendant.

that some experiments had been tried at Mr Joshua Nunn, Deputy to Lord Do his house for the purpose of shewing that noughmore, and one of the Secondaries in it was easy to imitate the defendant's handthe Remembrancer's office, in Ireland, who writing, and that in fact, there was a perhad known the defendant since 1792, son of the name of Carr, who had written poned that the letters were the hand-writ- the libel, but would not avow it, for fear of ing of Mr Justice Johnson.

A gentle his father being dismissed from a place he man, named Edwards, who knew Mr John- held under government. Four other wit. son's hand-writing, gave a similar testi- nesses deposed nearly in the same terms, mony.

positively denying the least resemblance beThe allusions of Cambridgeshire Earl and tween the libel and the defendant's ordinary Stout Chancery Pleader, contained in the writing. libel, were then proved by Mr Charles Lord Ellenborough went over the whole Crowe, as applicable to Earl Hardwicke, of the case, and recapitulated all the eviand Lord Redesdale.

dence. He remarked upon several inconMr Adam then commenced a most able graities in the evidence of the defendant's defence for the accused Judge, whom he witnesses, particularly the utter improbabidescribed as a gentleman, who had passed lity of the defendant's knowing the real a long life in the honourable exercise of author. The Jury, in five minutes, returnthose important duties demanded by the ed a verdict of Guilty.

SCOT

Scottish Chronicle.

IN

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PEERS PRESENT.

........48

......43

.....44 .......50 ......53

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Semple 22

Eirl of Moray,

Marchmont", ELECTION OF Peras.

Dysart,

Hopetoun,
N virtue of his Majesty's proclamation of

Dundonald, Visc. Falkland,
Kintore,

Stormont,
for Scotland came on a: Holyroodhouse on

Dunmore, I.ord Torphichen.--16 Thursday Dec. 4. Their Lordships were attended by John Pringle and James Wal- After going through the usual ceremoker, Esqrs. two of the Principal Clerks of nies, the Clerks declared the following Session, as Deputies of the Lord Clerk Re- Noble Lords to be duly elected :gister, 'by Drs Grieve and Somerville, two

William Earl of Errol........ ...44 of his Majesty's Chaplains, and by the

Thomas Earl of Elgin and Kincardinc... 46 other proper officers.

Alexander Earl of Leven and Melville 45
Thomas Earl of Selkirk

.46

William Earl of Northesk...
Duke of Buccleuch, Earl of Aboyne,

...53
Alexander Earl of Balcarras..
Argyle,

Breadalbane,
Earl of Errol,

Aberdeen,

George Earl of Aberdeen......

John Earl of Stair ...........
Caithness,

Stair,
Morton,

Glasgow,

George Earl of Glasgow.

James Lord Forbes...
Home,
Viscount Arbuthnot,

...54
William Lord Cathcart.....
Strathmore,
Lord Forbes,

..53 Kellie,

John Lord Elphinstone...
Cathcart,

,47
John Lord Somerville..
Haddington,
Sinclair,

.51 Galloway,

Robert Walter Lord Blantyre.....
Semple,

.45 Lauderdale,

Eric Lord Reay........
Elphinstone,

.42
Charles Lord Kinnaird.
Kinnoul,

Blantyre,
Elgin,
Napier,

UNSUCCESSFUL CANDIDATES.
Dalhousie,

Reay,

Earlof Strathmore 32 | Earl of Aboyne 38
Leven,
Elibank,

Kellie 35
Lord Saltoun

5
Selkirk,
Belhaven,

Haddington 34
Northesk,
Rollo,
Dalhousie 37

Napier 36
Balcarras,

Kinnaird. 36

Those marked thus $ are new, in room of

the Earls of Eglintoun, Cassillis, and BreadHis Royal Highness

albane, lately created British Peers; and Duke of Rothesay, Proxy.

the Earls of Strathmore, Kellie, Dalhousie,
(Pr.of Wales) to the Earl of Lauderdale, and Aboyne, and Lord Napier.
Duke of Lennox,

Elgin,
Gordon,

Aboyne,

This was one of the keenest contests Queensberry, Stair,

that ever took place on any similar occaEarl of Crawford,

Kellie, sion. All those having right voted, except Eglintoun, Duke of Argyle, the Duke of Hamilton, Marquis of Lothiani, Cassillis, Lord Elphinstone,

Earls of Buchan, Wemyss, and Findlater, Abercorn, Earl of Aberdeen, Lords Gray, Saltoun, Fairfax, and Ruthven, Portmore,

Stair,

some of whom are at present abroad. The Deloraine, Duke of Buccleuch, Marquis of Tweedale, Earl of Dumfries, Viscount Dunblane, Earl of Elgin,

and Lord Cranston, are minors. Lord Somerville, Lord Cathcart,

The election was not over till half past Colville, Earl of Breadalbane, five o'clock. The place in the gallery allotKirkcudbright Lauderdale.-14

ted for the admission of Peers' tickets was

filled early in the forenoon. A number of SIGNED LISTS.

Ladies of the first distinction were present, Duke of Athol, Earl of Hyadford,

and many could not obtain admission. OwMontrose,

Roseberry,

ing to the great attention paid by the offiRoxburgh',

Bute,

cial people present, every thing was con

ducted in a proper manner, * The title of Duke and Earl of Roxburgh, is claimed by Brig.-Gen. Walter Ker of Littledean. His vote was received,

* The title of Earl of Marchmont is but was protested against by some of the claimed by Lieut. Alexander Home, of the 'Peers, and also by another claimant. soyal navy, who also voted under process.

PROXIIS.

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Particular State of the Votes at the Election of Scots PEERS, December 4th 1806.

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P. Duke of Rothsay,,

Buccleuch,
P.

Lenox,
P.

Gordon,
P

Queensberry,

Argyle,
L.

Athole,
L.

Montrose,
L.

Roxburgh,
P. Earl of Crawford,

Errol,
Caithness,

Morton,
P.

Eglinton,
P.

Cassillis,
L.

Moray,
Home,

Strathmore,
P.

Abercorn,
Kelly,
Hadinton,
Galloway,
Lauderdale,
Kinnoul,
Elgin,
Dalhousie,

Leven,
L.

Dysart,

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