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ALBEMARLE STREET.

Dec. 1868.

HANDY EDITIONS.

Books that you may carry to the fire, and hold readily in your hand, are the most useful after all. A man will often look at them, and be tempted to go on, when he would have been frightened at books of a larger size and of a more erudite appearance.”—DR. Jouxsox.

O LLISTORICA

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BENEDICITE; or, Song of the Three Children : JESSE'S GLEANINGS IN NATURAL HIS

being Illustrations of the Power, Beneficence, and Design in the TORY. Woodcuts. Fcap. 8vo. 68. Works of Creation. By DR. CHAPLIN CHILD. Post svo. 68.

LIVINGSTONE'S (DR.) POPULAR ACBYRON'S (LORD POETICAL WORKS.

COUNT OF HI MISSIONARY TRAVELS IN SOUTH Plates. 10 vcls. Fcap. 8vo. 308.

AFRICA. Woodcuts. Post 8vo. 68. CHOICE TRAVELS. A Series of Illustrated LESLIE'S HANDBOOK FOR YOUNG Volumes. Post 8vo. 78. 6d. each.

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| MAHON'S (LORD) HISTORY of ENGLAND, II. DUFFERIN'S (LORD) HIGH LATITUDES. III. HEAD'S BUEBLES FROM THE BRUNNEN.

from the Peace of Utrecht to the Peace of Versailles, 11293

7 vols. Pust 8vo. 53. each. IV. LAYARD'S NIVEVEN AND ITS REMAINS. V. LAYARD'S NINEVEH AND BABYLON.

MAHON'S (LORD) LIFE OF CONDÉ THE VI. PARKYN'S TIIREE YEARS IN ABYSSINIA.

GREAT. Post svo. 38. 6d. COLERIDGE'S TABLE-TALK. Portrait.

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with the Author's latest Corrections and Additions. Complete in CRABBE'S LIFE AND POETICAL WORKS. 15 vols. Post 8vo. 6s. each. Containing Plates. 8 vols. Fcap. 8vo. 248.

I. HISTORY OF THE JEWS. 3 vols.

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NETHERLANDS, from the Death of William the Silent to the FRERE'S (MISS) HINDOO FAIRY LE

Twelve Years' Truce, 1609. 4 vols. Crown 8vo. 6s. each. GENDS, collected from Oral Tradition. With an Introduction and Notes by SIR BARTLE FRERE. Coloured Illustrations and

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V. TIIOMAS TELFORD. III. LITERARY HISTORY OF EUROPE. A vols. HANDBOOK OF FAMILIAR QUOTATIONS | SOUTIIEY'S BOOK OF THE CHURCH.

Post 8vo. 78.6c?. chiefly from English Authors. Fcap. 8vo. 58. HIEBER'S (BISHOP) POETICAL WORKS. STANHOPE'S (EARL) LIFE OF WILLIAM Portrait. Fcap. 8vo. 68.

PITT. Portraits. 4 vols. Post 8vo. 248. JAMESON'S (MRS.) MEMOIRS OF THE WILKINSON'S (SIR J. G.) PRIVATE LIFE. EARLY ITALIAN PAINTERS,CIMABte to BASSAKO. With

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TIANS, Woodcuts. 2 vols. Post svo. 128.

JOIIN MURRAY, Albemarle Street.

LONDON, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 26, 1868. page and its reverse, which is blank. It is sup

posed to be written by Christmas himself, and CONTENTS.-N° 52.

after referring to the former celebration of the NOTES: - Christmas Tracts, 597 – Old Christmas Carol, feast, and the pitiful quandary he has been in

&c., 599 — Bridget Cromwelí, 600 – Poem by Leigh Hunt, | any time these twelve years, he proceeds:601 - Temple of Jupiter Feretrius at San Leo, 16.- Ben Jonson's Plays, 16.- New Edition of Archbishop Leigh “I was in good hope that so long a misery would ton's Works, 604 — London in 1605 – Epigrams - Strange have made them glad to bid a merry Christmas welcome. Names- The Brothers Percy - A New Cheer - Funeral But, welcome or not. welcome, I am come; and at my Custom, 604.

coming a little before day) I heard the cock crow merQUERIES: – Admire: "to Wonder at ” – Plurality of

rily, which I took for a good omen, or preface of a most Altars -- Apple-drains: Wasps -- Carlisle - Cromwell and Milton - Copyright before Printing : Chaucer aud Adam

free and jovial accommodation, which rejoyced me much, Scrivener - Differencing Coat Armour - Eglantine - J. for I was as hungry as a hawk and as cold as a snowFesdon - Halantow: Rumbelow - Helstone: Harpstone ball: the sable curtains of the night being drawn, I gazed - A Tragedy of Lemierre, not Tremierre - Parisian Tones to and fro to make choice of the best houses, and house- Poem - Quotations wanted -- Martin Luther's Wed

keepers, to take up my quarters amongst them. But ding-ring Pope's “Eastern Priests" - Serjeants -"Talleyrand Perigord,” 605.

alas! the comfort that I found was colder than the

weather ; indeed, I saw many stately buildings, but very QUERIES WITH ANSWERS: -“Unfortunate Miss Bailey" -Green Joseph - List of Graduates -- The Ballot - Foxe's

little smoak from the chimnies, for most of the owners " Book of Martyrs" - Sir Peter Warren - Domesday did carry their kitchins in boxes, and the best and dearest Survey - Proper Colour for Liveries, 608.

part of their roast meat in pipes.” REPLIES:- “Ossa in ferre licebit," 610 - Parish Registers,

Old Christmas then gives an account of his 611 - The Term “Galilee," 612 -- Shakesperian Pronun. ciation-Vulcan Dancy-History of Cutlery-Confederate visiting a “ fair house in London, that had bin an Flag - Skelp - Caroline Matilda, Queen of Denmark

alderman's, but was then possest with a grave Hymn: “ Praise the Lord" - The Younger Pliny's Epistle to Trajan-Threshold - Capture of Judæa, &c.--"Legends fox-fur'd Mammonist," who receives him with of Devon" - Modern Latinity -" Original and Miscella

scant courtesy, and in fact turns him out of the neous Essays,” by a Virginian --" Crom a Boo" - Dr. John Donne – Unpublished Poem of Burns - Newt

house, after admitting that he, together with Sir The Syracusan Bride Gallic Nomenclature of the pre Achitophel Pinchgut and M. Miser, had got on sent Day -- Egyptian Papyri: Moses - St. Stephen

in the world by being Timists. He then proceeds Slyces - Fettle, &c., 612. Notes on Books, &c.

to say, that his best welcome with some kinde of country farmers was in Devonshire, although

both armies had been with them; the Cavaliers Notes.

having taken their horses, and the other party CHRISTMAS TRACTS.

made bold with their oxen. Well, he appears to

have found good entertainment with them; as he Amongst a few old tracts relating to Christ

would still do there and further west, and he mas in my possession, some of which I believe are |

ń rare, the following three may perhaps be worth

finishes thus (which has been quoted elsewhere, notice in “N. & Q." I may observe that in

but shows some of the country customs of the another, called Festorum Metropolis, the Metro

time):politan Feast, or the Birth-Day of Our Saviour "After Dinner we arose from the boord, and sate by the Jesus Christ, is contained the carol of Prudentius,

| fire, where the Barth was imbrodered all over with

roasted Apples, piping hot, expecting a bole of Ale for a said to be the earliest carol.

cooler, which immediately was transformed into warm The first of the three tracts above referred to

Lamb-wool. * After which we discoursed merrily, withis —

out either profaneness or obscenity; some went to cards,

others sung carols and pleasant sons (suitable to the “The Vindication of CHRISTMAS ; or, His Twelve Yeares Observations upon the great and lamentable

times), then the poor labouring Hinds, and Maid-serTragedy between the King and Parliament; acted by

| vants, with the plow-bors, went nimbly to dancing; the General Plunder, and Major-General Tar; With his Ex

| poor toyling wretches being glad of my company, be

cause they had little or no sport at all till I came amongst hortation to the People; a Description of that oppressing

them; and therefore they skipped and leaped for joy, Ringworm called Excize ; and the manner how our high and mighty Christmas-Ale, that formerly would knock | singing a Carol to the Tune ol, heydown Hercules, and trip up the heels of a Giant, strook “Let's dance and sing, and make good chear, into a deep Consumption with a blow from Westminster.

For Christmas comes but once a-year;

Draw llogsheads dry, let Flagons fiy, Then follows on the same page a rude wood

For now the Bells shall ring; cut, with three figures; one apparently a Cavalier Whilst we endeavour to make good with a label issuing from his mouth, saying

The Title 'gainst a King. " Keep out, you come not here"; the next is Old! “ Thus at active Games, and Gambols of Hotcockles, Father Christmas himself, saying "0, Sir, I shooing the wild Mare, and the like harmless sports, some bring good cheere"; the next a countryman, part of the tedious night was spent, and early in the saying " Old Christmas welcome; do not fear." | morning I took my leave of them, promising they should Below this woodcut comes, “Imprinted at London

* Mr. Editor, did you ever drink genuine Lamb'sfor G. Horton, 1653.” The tract itself comprises wool ? if not, I will not say, as Punch did to those about only eight pages quarto, including the above title- to marry, "Don't,"-but I will say, “ Do."

have my presence again the next 25 of December, 1653 ; | be a juryman. He was also a mumper and in the interim, I left this Christian Exhortation, to all | kennel-raker. The list is then completed with people in general:“Love one another, as my Master lov'd you, relieve

John Free-body and Robin Goodfellow. the oppressed, call home Éxiles, help the Fatherless. The jury being sworn, and old Christmas being cherish the Widow, and restore to every man his due. charged with enticing, on the 25th of December “ Vale, for Twelve Moneths.”

| last, and several days following, divers of his The next tract does not require much notice : Majesty's peaceable subjects to idleness, drunkenircluding the title-page and the blank reverse, it ness, gluttony, gaming, cursing, swearing, rioting, contains sixteen pages quarto. The following is and all manner of debauchery, to the great corthe title-page :

ruption of their manners, the consumption of their “ The Exaltation of Christmas Pye, As it was De

fortunes, and the utter ruin of their constitutions, liver'd in a Preachment in Lime-Street, on these Words,

the witnesses are called against the prisoner, and And they did eat their PLUMB Pyes and rejoiced exceed

first, Sauney Scarecrow, who declares him to be ingly. By P. B., Doctor of Divinity and Midwifry. “a mickle spandthrift, and ane that consumes London : Printed for J. Roberts, in the Oxford-Arms mare in ane day than aw the mairkats in ScoatPassage in Warwick-Lane. 1728.”

land can furnish in a week, and had drawn the It is written in the form of a sermon, the text witness into immoralities, having first made him at the head of it being—“Brewerton, chap. xix. as drunk as a bagpiper." Then come-Francis ver. 31: 'And they did eat their Plumb Pyes, Frugal, who calls him an extravagant old fellow; and rejoiced exceedingly.'”

Susanna Quiet, a great lover of silence, who deThere is not much wit or humour in the work, nounces him as a common disturber; Mary Pruand several passages are gross and obscene.

dence, who complains of the rude conduct to The last tract of the three comprises 31 pages herself and her three daughters, Patience, Tem-8vo, including the title-page and blank reverse. / perance, and Modesty (whose virtues she dilates The title-page is :

on) by the prisoner and three of his companions, “ The Tryal of Old Father Christmas, For Encouraging Gamester, Guzzle, and Brazen. Next comes his MAJESTY's Subjects in Idleness, Gluttony, Drunken: | David ap Jones, who proceeds to state that his ness, Gaming, Swearing, Rioting, and all Manner of name is Taffy ap Chones, ap Chenkin, ap Morgan, Extravagance and Debauchery. At the Assizes held in

ap Rice, ap Griffith, ap Lloyd, ap Williams, ap the City of PROFUSION, Before The Lord Chief Justice • CHURCHMAN, Mr. Justice FEAST, Mr. Justice GAMBOL,

- , when he is stopped by the Court. He then and several other his Majesty's Justices of Over and Ter gives an account of an assault made by the priminer and Gaol Delivery. By Josiasi King. Londox. soner and others on himself and three MontPrinted and sold by T. Boreman near Child's Coffee- | gomery-shire gentlemen when they were at dinner House, in St. Paul's Church-yard, and Suld likewise at on " a tish of ret herrinks, a tish of leek porrich, his Shop at the Cock on Ludgate Hill. MDccxxxv.”

and a tish of roasted cheece." Caleb Carefull Father Christmas is placed at the bar, and complains of the prisoner as the greatest epicure pleads “Not Guilty,” when the following jury- | living. He has known him to eat 1000 hams, men are called: Lawrence Idle, Barnaby Toss- 1200 dozen of fowls, 1500 chines, 2000 turkeys, pot, Peter Starve-mouse. He is challenged by 2500 sirloins of beef, 3000 gallons of plum porChristmas as a man of no soul, and a friend of no ridge, 17,000 minced pies, with bread in proporcreature living, and endeavouring to ruin not only | tion, with strong beer, Geneva, brandy, punch, the company of cooks, but even the very mouse

and wine, beyond all proportion; and all this in trap makers, so that not even a cat would live one day. Roger Workall, Marmaduke Meanwell, with him. Then Patrick Pinch, Jeffery Grudge, Captain Twang, Crispin a Cobler, Captain Dray, and Henry Hoard, who are all challenged, as Mr. Blindzeal, Captain Capons-face, and Mrs. Allbeing related to Peter Starve-mouse :

tongue, all speak against the prisoner's character “ And if they make a Feast, they club their three in different ways. The prisoner then in his deFarthings a-piece for a Joint of Carion at Rag-fair, or a fence says, that he is above 1700 years old, and stale Bullock's Liver, stuff?d with Garlick and Chews of dever was questioned at sizes or sessions before; * Tobacco, and larded with an Ounce of rusty Bacon."

and proceeds at some length to speak his own The Clerk of the Court then calls Henry merits, and comment on some of the evidence. Plump, Martin Merryman, John Jolly, Timothy He calls as his witnesses Simon Servant, Peter Tunbelly, Solomon Save-all — who is challenged | Poor, and Nicholas Neighbourhood, and afteras being one who never eats a full meal but “when wards Sir Peaceful Plenty, Sir Charles Cheerup, sprats are Two-pence a Peck, and then he boils 'em and Doctor Holiday, a divine; all of whom, as for the sake of the Broth.” Next are called Wil- | may be guessed from their names, testify highly liam Holiday, Jonathan Open-house, Gregory in his favour. Two more witnesses are then Chine, Toby Turkey, and Simon Scrape, who is called against him - Sir Musty Make-bate, and challenged as not having been made free of the Squire Flant, of Mock-beggars' Hall, of whom City of Profusion, and therefore had no right to the former says that the prisoner is a counterfeit,

for pretending the 25th of December to be his day, when it should be about the latter end of September, or beginning of October. The jury, without retiring, find the prisoner Not guilty, which verdict is welcomed " with the loud shouts and applauses of the joyful crowd.” The judge then gives his sentence and directions to Father Christmas, to temper his hospitality with prudence, avoiding gluttony and excess. The tract ends with these two lines:** And Christmas straight was courted far and near, To each good house to taste their plenteous chear.”

WM. SANDYS.

OLD CHRISTMAS CAROL SUNG BY THE

CHILDREN AT BECKINGTON, SOMERSET.

The enclosed curious carol has been recently brought under my notice, and seems to be quite in season for the readers of “N. & Q." The friend who gave it me heard it sung in the streets the year before last. The only one like it that has appeared in “ N. & Q.” is in 1st S. iv. 325. The numerals, however, in that are differently appropriated, and some of them are, with our present light, perfectly unintelligible-e.g.:

“ Nine is nine so bright to shine ..

Eight is the gable angels ...
Six is the six bold traiters ..
Five is the flamboys under the bough.. .

Three of them is thrivers.” The only special difficulty in the carol before us is the reference to “our Lady's hen.” Can this have any connection with the proverb “ As nice as a nun's hen” ? and if any, what? J. PAYNE.

Kildare Gardens.
“Sing! sing! what shall us sing ?

Sing all over one.
One! what is one ?
One they do call * the righteous man,
Save poor souls to rest, Amen.
" Sing! sing! what shall us sing?
Sing all over two.
Two! what is two ? Two is the Jewry.
One is God ?
We

the righteous man.
they do call the righteou
Save poor souls to rest, Amen.
“ Sing! sing! what shall ns sing?

Sing all over three.
Three! what is three ?
Three is the Trinity.

Chorus.-Two is the Jewry.

One they do call, &c.
“Sing! sing! what shall us sing?

Sing all over four.
Four! what is four ?
Four is the open door.

Chorus.- Three is the Trinity, &c.

“ Sing! sing! what shall us sing ?
Sing all over five.
Five! what is five ?
Five is the man alive.

Chorus.-Four is the open door, &c. “ Sing! sing ! what shall us sing ?

Sing all over six.
Six ! what is six ?
Six is the crucifix.

Chorus.- Five is the man alive, &c. “Sing! sing! what shall us sing?

Sing all over seven.
Seven! what is seven ?
Seven is the bread of leaven.'*

Chorus.-Six is the crucifix, &c. “Sing! sing! what shall us sing ?

Sing all over eight.
Eight! what is eight ?
Eight is the crooked straight.

Chorus.—Seven is the bread, &c. “Sing! sing! what shall us sing ?

Sing all over nine,
Nine! what is nine ?
Nine is the water wine.'

Chorus.-Eight is, &c.
“Sing! sing! what shall us sing?
Sing all over ten.
Ten! what is ten ?
Ten is. Our Lady's hen.'

Chorus.-Nine is, &c. “Sing! sing! what shall us sing?

Sing all over eleven.
Eleven! what is eleven ?
Eleven is the gate of heaven.

Chorus.-Ten is, &c. “ Sing! sing! what shall us sing ?

Sing all over twelve.
Twelve! what is twelve ?
Twelve is the ring of bells.'

Chorus.--Eleven is the gate of heaven.

Ten is Our Lady's hen,
Nine is the water wine,
Eight is the crooked straight,
Seven is the bread of leaven,
Six is the crucifix,
Five is the man alive,
Four is the open door,
Three is the Trinity,
Two is the Jewry,
One they do call
The Righteous Man.
Save poor souls
To rest, Amen."

“ ONE IS ONE AND ALL ALONE” (4th S. ü. 324.)—I remember as a boy hearing the following:—“One is one," &c., sung as « What shall we sing O? We will sing the ones O ? One is one,” &c. Then “What shall we sing O? We will sing the twos 0." Two, &c. “What shall we sing O? We will sing the threes 0,” and so on to twelve-always repeating the numbers all back to one. The end was —

“ What shall we sing 0 ?
We will sing the twelves 0.

* Query, heaven?

. Var. (1) One is God, the righteous Man.

(2) One is a godly righteous man.

Twelve twelve apostles,

on the fact that the family of Fleetwood was conEleven arch-angels,

nected for a considerable period with that parish. Ten ten commandments,

That a Bridget Fleetwood was there buried at
Vine bright shiners (?)
Eight gabriel angels.

that date there can be no doubt; but it is equally Seven were the stars of heaven.

certain that she was not the Protector's daughter Six broad waters.

and wife of the Parliamentary general. Noble Five tumblers on a board,

and all other writers on the subject appear to And four gospel writers.

have accepted that entry in the register as conThree three divers (?) Two two lily white boys,

clusive, without troubling themselves with further And they were clothed in green 0.

investigations. One is one and all alone,

The first discovery that led me to doubt the And ever more shall be so."

correctness of the tradition was a marriage alleIt was sung in a monotone. It was the repeti- gation in the Faculty Office, dated August 24th, tion that, as a child, pleased me-like the “Ilouse 1669, in substance as follows:that Jack built.”

II. H.

“ Thomas Bendish of Gray's Inn, gentleman, aged

about twenty-four, was to marry Bridget Ireton, spinster, OLD LATIN RELIGIOUS Song (4th S. ii. 557.)

aged about nineteen, whose parents were dead, and she

living with and at the disposal of her father-in-law, The following similar hymu is said in Hebrew by

Charles Fleetwood, Esq., of Stoke Newington, whose conthe Rabbinical Jews on the first two nights of sent was alleged. They were to marry at Stoke NewPassover Hagadah (Echod me yode'ah), generally ington, Islington, or St. Leonard's, Shoreditch.” & who knows? x I know ; x is, &c. :

There was still a doubt whether the word “ r= 1 is our God in heaven and earth.

“ parents” in the allegation might not have been 2 are the tables of the covenant (Decalogue).

a clerical error, but this doubt was subsequently 3 are the patriarchs (Abraham, Isaac, Jacob). 4 are the matriarchs (Sarab, Rebekah, Rachel, and

removed by discovering in the Bishop of LonLeah).

don’s registry another allegation to the following 5 are the books of the Pentateuch,

efect:6 are the sections of the Mishnah.

" Richard Lloyd of St. James's, Duke's Place, London, 7 are the days of the week.

widower, aged about thirty, was to marry Jane Ireton of 8 are the days before circumcision.

Newington, Middlesex, spinster, aged about twenty, whose 9 are the months of pregnancy.

parents were dead, with the consent of her father-in-law, 10 are the commandments.

Charles Fleetwood, Esq. They were to marry at Cheshunt, 11 are the stars (Joseph's dream).

Herts, St. James's, Duke's Place, or Newington aforesaid." 12 are the tribes (of Israel).

13 are the attributes of God (Exod. xxxiv. 6, 7).” The date of this latter allegation was January This hymn is followed by an Aramean one of | 22, 1667-8, and it was impossible longer to doubt the purchase of a kid-eaten by the cat, who was

t he use in the face of these two independent records in bitten by the dog, &c., in the style of “ The IIouse

different offices and at different periods, that that Jack built.” The said hymn was supposed

Bridget Cromwell was dead more than thirteen to be an allegory on Joseph's and Israel's tribula- |

years before the date given as that of her burial tion in Egypt, and their subsequent redemption ;

at Stoke Newington. borrowed from a German prototype (Delitzsch,

On referring to Robinson's History of Stoke Judisch Poesie, sect.17, published in the seventeenth Newington (edit. 1842, p. 77, note i.), I found the century). A Mr. Green of Kensington has alle- | following quoted from Strype's edition of Stou gorised the “ IIouse that Jack built ” as the con

Survey, as the inscription on a monument in Bunflict between the Anglican Church and the Papacy.

hill Fields:- . S. M. Dracu. “Charles Fleetwood, Esq., and Dame Mary Hartopp his

wife. He departed October 4, 1692, aged 74: she De[The subject of these communications is closely con

cember 17, 1681." nected. They all obviously refer to some legend or story common, we believe, to the folk lore of every country, Robinson very decisively adds :which circumstance points to some common origin. Is

“ This was the Lord General, but must be a mistake in it the Rabbinical hymn ?-ED, “ V. & Q."]

styling Dame Mary Ilartopp his wife ; she may very pro.

bably have been his son-in-law's mother." BRIDGET CROMWELL.

But it was not a mistake, for I subsequently The tradition that Bridget Ireton-Fleetwood,

found, also at the Faculty Office, another allegs

tion to this effect :_ née Cromwell, eldest daughter of the Protector Oliver, was buried at Stoke Newington, must be

“ Charles Fleetwood, Esq. of Feltwell, in the co. of Norabandoned. It was based on an entry in the

folk, widower, aged about fifty, was to marry Dame Mary

Hartopp of Newington, Middlesex, widow, aged about parish register, which states that Bridget Fleet

geurleet- / forty. They were to marry at St. Ann, Blackfriars : St. wood was buried on the 5th of Sept. 1681, and Mary Colechurch, London, or Newington aforesaid."

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