The History of the Rise, Progress, and Accomplishment of the Abolition of the African Slave-trade by the British Parliament, Band 2

Cover
Longman, Hurst, Rees, and Orme, 1808
 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

LibraryThing Review

Nutzerbericht  - Shuffy2 - LibraryThing

Thomas Clarkson, an ardent advocate of British Abolition details the road to the Act of the Abolition of the Slave Trade that was passed in 1807. The book orginally published in 1808, highlights his ... Vollständige Rezension lesen

Ausgewählte Seiten

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite 515 - Both thy bondmen, and thy bondmaids, which thou shalt have, shall be of the heathen that are round about you ; of them shall ye buy bondmen and bondmaids. Moreover of the children of the strangers that do sojourn among you, of them shall ye buy, and of their families that are with you, which they begat in your land : and they shall be your possession.
Seite 190 - Deem our nation brutes no longer, Till some reason ye shall find Worthier of regard and stronger Than the colour of our kind. Slaves of gold, whose sordid dealings Tarnish all your boasted powers, Prove that you have human feelings, Ere you proudly question ours ! PITY FOR POOR AFRICANS.
Seite 529 - A dungeon horrible on all sides round As one great furnace flamed; yet from those flames No light; but rather darkness visible Served only to discover sights of woe, Regions of sorrow, doleful shades, where peace And rest can never dwell, hope never comes That comes to all; but torture without end Still urges, and a fiery deluge, fed With ever-burning sulphur unconsumed.
Seite 188 - O'er the raging billows borne. Men from England bought and sold me, Paid my price in paltry gold ; But, though slave they have enroll'd me, Minds are never to be sold. Still in thought as free as ever...
Seite 372 - To them his heart, his love, his griefs, were given, But all his serious thoughts had rest in heaven. As some tall cliff that lifts its awful form, Swells from the vale, and midway leaves the storm, Though round its breast the rolling clouds are spread, Eternal sunshine settles on its head.
Seite 189 - Is there, as ye sometimes tell us, Is there One who reigns on high? Has he bid you buy and sell us, Speaking from his throne, the sky ? Ask him, if your knotted scourges^ Matches, blood-extorting screws, Are the means...
Seite 189 - Sighs must fan it, tears must water, Sweat of ours must dress the soil. Think, ye masters iron-hearted. Lolling at your jovial boards; Think how many backs have smarted For the sweets, your cane affords.
Seite 445 - We were once as obscure among the nations of the earth, as savage in our manners, as debased in our morals, as degraded in our understandings, as these unhappy Africans are at present. But in the lapse of a long series of years, by a progression slow, and for a time almost imperceptible, we have become rich in a variety of acquirements...
Seite 448 - ... expected in the state of her inhabitants, is, of all the various and important benefits of the abolition, in my estimation, incomparably the most extensive and important. I shall vote, sir, against the adjournment ; and I shall also oppose to the utmost every proposition which in any way may tend either to prevent, or even to postpone for an hour, the total abolition of the slave trade : a measure which, on all the various grounds which I have stated, we are bound, by the most pressing and indispensable...

Bibliografische Informationen