Poems

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C. C. Little & Company, 1839 - 214 Seiten
 

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Seite 29 - tis her privilege, Through all the years of this our life, to lead From joy to joy: for she can so inform The mind that is within us, so impress With quietness and beauty, and so feed With lofty thoughts, that neither evil tongues, Rash judgments, nor the sneers of selfish men, Nor greetings where no kindness is, nor all The dreary intercourse of daily life, Shall e'er prevail against us, or disturb Our cheerful faith, that all which we behold Is full of blessings.
Seite 29 - Nature never did betray The heart that loved her; 'tis her privilege, Through all the years of this our life, to lead From joy to joy: for she can so inform The mind that is within us, so impress With quietness and beauty, and so feed With lofty thoughts, that neither evil tongues, Rash judgments, nor the sneers of selfish men...
Seite 208 - If the system be wrong, as we have endeavored to show, if it be at variance with our duty both to God and to man, it must be abandoned. If it be asked when, I ask again, when shall a man begin to cease doing wrong? Is not the answer, immediately ? If a man is injuring us, do we ever doubt as to the time when he ought to cease? There is then no doubt in respect to the time when we ought to cease inflicting injury upon others.
Seite 207 - ... objects on whom passion may be satiated without resistance and without redress, it cultivates in the master, pride, anger, cruelty, selfishness and licentiousness. By accustoming the slave to subject his moral principles to the will of another, it tends to abolish in him all moral distinction ; and thus fosters in him lying, deceit, hypocrisy, dishonesty, and a willingness to yield himself up to minister to the appetites of his master.
Seite 108 - Ye that do gather round us in these hours When the impassioned world lies locked in sleep, And the day's whirl is over, tell us here, What are those rolling worlds ! Are there bright scenes, Such as we dream of here ? Are there fair realms, Robed in such hues as this ? Do wild hills there Heave their high tops to such a bright, blue heaven As this which spans our world ? Have they rocks there, Ragged and thunder-rent, through whose wild chasms Leap the white cataracts, and...
Seite 209 - The duty of slaves is also explicitly made known in the Bible. They are bound to obedience, fidelity, submission, and respect to their masters, not only to the good and kind, but also to the unkind and froward; not, however, on the ground of duty to man, but on the ground of duty to God.
Seite 109 - Spread such bright plains there to the admiring eye, Veined by glad brooks, that to the loose, white stones Tell their complaint all day ? waves, spreading sheets, That mirror the white clouds, and moon, and stars, Making a mimic heaven ? streams, mighty streams ! Waters, resistless floods ! that, rolling on, Gather like seas, and heave their waves about, Mocking the tempest ? Ocean ! those vast tides Tumbling about the globe with a wild roar From age to age...
Seite 107 - But in its motion like an angel sings, Still quiring to the young-eyed cherubim, Such harmony is in immortal souls ; But while this muddy vesture of decay Does grossly close us in we cannot hear it.
Seite 111 - ... sweet Death doth but make it sweeter ? Have ye dreamers, Young hearts ! proud souls ! that catch from every thing A greatness, and a grandeur of delight, That common souls feel not ? souls that do dwell Only in thoughts of beauty, linking forth, Into one mystic chain, the fadeless flowers And wreaths of immortality ? that dwell Only to think and feel, and be the slaves Of a sad nature ; and, when life is over, Only to take the charnel, with the hope A star may hang above them for the eye Of the...
Seite 110 - And, sublime, Within his grasp the whirlwinds, and his brows White with the storm of ages, and his breath Fettering the streams, and ribbing the old hills With ice, and sleet, and snow ; and, far along The sounding Ocean's side, his frosty chains Flinging, till the wild waves grow mute, or mutter Only in their dread caves — old Winter ! he — Have you him there ? And tell us, hath a GOD, Sentient and wise, placed there the abstruser realm Of thinking and of feeling ? Have ye minds, Grasping and...

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