The London Quarterly Review, Band 42

Cover
William Lonsdale Watkinson, William Theophilus Davison
Tresidder, 1874
 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite 303 - Under such rubric I find written many things ; and among them the words which I purpose to copy into this little book ; if not all of them, at the least their substance. Nine times already since my birth had the heaven of light returned to the self-same point almost, as concerns...
Seite 244 - If we could view the universe as a candle not lit, then it is perhaps conceivable to regard it as having been always in existence ; but if we regard it rather as a candle that has been lit, we become absolutely certain that it cannot have been burning from eternity, and that a time will come when it will cease to burn.
Seite 475 - Or less happiness, it may be, would, upon the whole, be produced by such a method of conduct, than is by the present : Or, perhaps, divine goodness, with which, if I mistake not, we make very free in our speculations, may not be a bare single disposition to produce happiness ; but a disposition to make the good, the faithful, the honest man, happy.
Seite 303 - Her dress, on that day, was of a most noble colour, a subdued and goodly crimson, girdled and adorned in such sort as best suited with 31 her very tender age. At that moment, I say most truly that the spirit of life, which hath its dwelling in the secretest chamber of the heart, began to tremble so violently that the least pulses of my body shook therewith ; and in trembling it said these words...
Seite 200 - Though I bear record of myself, yet my record is true : for I know whence I came, and whither I go ; but ye cannot tell whence I come, and whither I go.
Seite 31 - Scotch fir (Pinus silvestris), often three feet in diameter, which must have grown on the margin of the peat-mosses, and have frequently fallen into them. This tree is not now, nor has ever been in historical times, a native of the Danish islands, and when introduced there has not thriven...
Seite 7 - It's no in books, it's no in lear, To make us truly blest : If happiness hae not her seat And centre in the breast, We may be wise, or rich, or great, But never can be blest : Nae treasures, nor pleasures, Could make us happy lang; The heart aye's the part aye, That makes us right or wrang.
Seite 492 - For the Lord your God is God of gods and Lord of lords, a great God, a mighty, and a terrible, which regardeth not persons, nor taketh reward : He doth execute the judgment of the fatherless and widow, and loveth the stranger, in giving him food and raiment. Love ye therefore the stranger : for ye were strangers in the land of Egypt.
Seite 32 - In the time of the Romans the Danish Isles were covered, as now, with magnificent beech forests. Nowhere in the world does this tree flourish more luxuriantly than in Denmark, and eighteen centuries seem to have done little. or nothing towards modifying the character of the forest vegetation. Yet in the antecedent bronze period there were no beech trees, or at most but a few stragglers, the country being then covered with oak.
Seite 202 - Lord, to whom shall we go but unto Thee? Thou hast the words of eternal life.

Bibliografische Informationen