Economic Geology: With Special Reference to the United States

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Macmillan, 1910 - 589 Seiten

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Inhalt

General structure section of the Richmond basin in the vicinity of the James River
27
Section across Eastern Interior coal field
28
Shaft house and tipple bituminous coal mine Spring Valley III
30
Interior and Southwestern fields 30 Western Interior field
30
Index map of Colorado coal fields
34
Geologic sections northwestsoutheast in southeastern part of Anthracite Colo sheet
35
Map of Alaska showing distribution of coal and coalbearing rocks so far as known
36
Yearly production of anthracite and bituminous coal from 1856 to 1908 in short tons
38
Diagram showing how plants fill depressions from the sides and top to form a peat deposit
43
CHAPTER II
50
Section of anticlinal fold showing accumulation of gas oil and water
62
Showing positions and vertical sections of wells southeast of Humboldt Kas and differing thickness and number of sands in neighboring wells
63
68 Appalachian field 68 OhioIndiana field 71 Illinois field
68
Map showing lines of sections in Plate VII
69
Northsouth section showing structure of western field of
77
Map of Alaska showing areas in which oil or gas are known
81
Map showing relation of grahamite fissure to anticlinal fold
87
asphalt 88 Manjak 88 Vintaite or Gilsonite 88 Maltha
89
Chart of oil production
93
CHAPTER III
101
Photomicrograph of a section of granite
102
Map showing distribution of crystalline rocks mainly granites
109
Map showing inarble areas of eastern United States
113
Section in slate quarry with cleavage parallel to bedding
119
120 Production of building stones 120 References on building
120
CHAPTER IV
124

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Seite 531 - For each 0.02 per cent, or fraction thereof, in excess of 0.20 per cent phosphorus there shall be a deduction of 2 cents per unit of manganese per ton. Ores containing less than 40 per cent manganese or more than 12 per cent silica or 0.225 per cent phosphorus are subject to acceptance or refusal at the buyer's option. Settlements are based on analysis of sample dried at 212° F., the percentage of moisture in the sample as taken being deducted from the weight.
Seite 553 - ... subjected. This left them in the right physical condition to be readily jointed and fissured by the contraction of the diabase. After the deposition of the cobalt-nickel arsenides, which seem to be among the first minerals deposited, the veins appear to have been slightly disturbed, giving rise to cracks and openings in which the silver and later minerals were deposited. Veins which escaped this later, slight disturbance contain little or no silver.
Seite 18 - Dry storage has no advantage over storage in the open except with high sulphur coals, where the disintegrating effect of sulphur in the process of oxidation facilitates the escape of hydrocarbons or the oxidation of the same.
Seite 221 - This addition is not as an adulterant, as was the case a few years ago, for it is now appreciated that the addition of barytes makes a white pigment more permanent, less likely to be attacked by acids, and freer from discoloration than when white lead is used alone.
Seite 62 - It is, of course, necessary that the oil-bearing stratum shall be capped by a practically impervious one. If the rocks are dry, then the chief points of accumulation of the oil will be at or near the bottom of the syncline, or lowest portion of the porous bed. If the rocks are partially saturated with water, then the oil accumulates at the upper level of saturation.
Seite 37 - ... DISCOVERY. Though La Salle in his hypothecated descent from the headwaters of the Allegheny to the Falls of the Ohio in 1669-703 would have passed by the eastern Kentucky coal field, he left no record indicating that he found coal during these explorations. To Father Hennepin,4 a French Jesuit Missionary, who in 1679 recorded the site of a "cole mine...
Seite 294 - The pressure, although primarily due to variations In level In the different parts of the artesian system, may be transmitted in so many ways and is subject to so many modifying factors that the postulation of a specific cause is impracticable.
Seite 523 - Some of the Leadville ores are used in the manufacture of spiegeleisen. All the other localities produce these ores for fluxing only. Manganiferous zinc residuum is obtained from zinc volatilizing and oxidizing furnaces using New Jersey zinc ores. The residuum consists largely of iron and manganese oxide, the zinc having been removed by volatilizing and collected as zinc oxide.
Seite 143 - Portland cement is the product obtained by burning a finely ground artificial mixture consisting essentially of lime, silica, alumina, and some iron oxide, these substances being present in certain definite proportions. Portland cement was first made by Joseph Apsdin, of Leeds, England, who desired to make an artificial cement that would replace natural hydraulic cements. It received its name because it hardened under water to a mass resembling the Portland stone of England. The following combinations...

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