The first (-third, fifth, sixth) reading book, by T. Crampton and T. Turner, Band 5

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Thomas Crampton
1858
 

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Seite 102 - I come from haunts of coot and hern, I make a sudden sally And sparkle out among the fern, To bicker down a valley. By thirty hills I hurry down, Or slip between the ridges, By twenty thorps, a little town, And half a hundred bridges.
Seite 189 - The smith, a mighty man is he, With large and sinewy hands, And the muscles of his brawny arms Are strong as iron bands.
Seite 102 - I chatter over stony ways, In little sharps and trebles, I bubble into eddying bays, I babble on the pebbles. With many a curve my banks I fret By many a field and fallow, And many a fairy foreland set With willow-weed and mallow. I chatter, chatter, as I flow To join the brimming river ; For men may come and men may go, But I go on forever.
Seite 41 - THE OLD FAMILIAR FACES. I HAVE had playmates, I have had companions, In my days of childhood, in my joyful school-days, All, all are gone, the old familiar faces. I have been laughing, I have been carousing, Drinking late, sitting late, with my bosom cronies, All, all are gone, the old familiar faces.
Seite 176 - THERE came to the beach a poor Exile of Erin, The dew on his thin robe was heavy and chill : For his country he sigh'd, when at twilight repairing To wander alone by the wind-beaten hill. But the day-star attracted his eye's sad devotion, For it rose o'er his own native isle of the ocean, Where once, in the fire of his youthful emotion, He sang the bold anthem of Erin go bragh. Sad is my fate...
Seite 29 - I COME, I come ! ye have called me long, I come o'er the mountains with light and song ! Ye may trace my step o'er the wakening earth, By the winds which tell of the violet's birth, By the primrose-stars in the shadowy grass, By the green leaves, opening as I pass.
Seite 41 - I loved a love once, fairest among women; Closed are her doors on me, I must not see her— All, all are gone, the old familiar faces. I have a friend, a kinder friend has no man : Like an ingrate, I left my friend abruptly; Left him to muse on the old familiar faces.
Seite 114 - Play on, play on ; I am with you there, In the midst of your merry ring ; I can feel the thrill of the daring jump, And the rush of the breathless swing. I hide with you in the fragrant hay, And I whoop the smothered call, And my feet slip up on the seedy floor, And I care not for the fall.
Seite 124 - THE MEN OF OLD. I KNOW not that the men of old Were better than men now, Of heart more kind, of hand more bold, Of more ingenuous brow : I heed not those who pine for force A ghost of Time to raise, As if they thus could check the course Of these appointed days.
Seite 220 - Lo, yonder doth Earl Douglas come, His men in armour bright ; Full twenty hundred Scottish spears All marching in our sight ; All men of pleasant Teviotdale, Fast by the river Tweed...

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