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The same SUBJECT As set ForTH IN THE ScKIPTUREs of THE OLD AND NEw

TESTAMENTs.

The imperfect character of the Revelations of which the Old Testament is the record,

35–38.-Its elevated utterances respecting the Divine character and perfections, 38–
44.—Those which ascribe to Him the imperfections of man, 44–45.-The imper-

The Account Of The CREATION AND FALL OF MAN, AS NARRATED IN THE

SECOND AND THIRD CHAPTERS OF GENESIS, IN ITS BEARING ON THE QUESTION

or HUMAN RESPONSIBILITY, AND THE VALIDITY OF THE VARIOUS THEORIES
WHICH HAVE BEEN ERECTED ON IT, EXAMINED AND CONSIDERED.

Reasons for considering this subject, 140. - The total absence of any reference to what
is designated “the doctrine of the fall” in the remaining books of the Old Testament,
and in the teaching of our Lord, 141–143.—Also in seventeen out of the twenty-three
books which compose the remaining writings of the New Testament, 143-144. -The
references to the third chapter of Genesis in St. Paul's four remaining epistles examined
and considered, 144-149.—The narrative in Genesis : its statements on the assump-
tion that it is intended to be a narrative of actual occurrences, 149–153.—The
inferences which, on this assumption, may be deduced from it, 153–157.-Its
silences, 157-159.—The reasons which have induced eminent theologians in all ages
of the Church to view the narrative as allegorical, 159–165. -General conclusions,
165–166.

The terminology of the New Testament not technical but popular, 185.—The Greek in

which it is written such as was in popular use in the different Christian communities,

to whom its writers assumed that it would be intelligible, 185–187.—The meaning of

its terminology not scientific or technical, but such as it bore in the Greek which was

habitually spoken by the members of the apostolic Churches, 187—189.— Impossible to

erect a scientific psychology of man on its use of the words πνευμα, ψυχή, σωμα

(spirit, soul, and body), 189–190.— Ilvēvua, spirit; the various meanings which it

bears in the New Testament examined, 190—194.-vuxn, soul; its various senses

examined and considered, 194–202.---Lama, body; its usage by the apostolic

writers, 202–204.---- Aiwv, age, or dispensation ; oi aiôres, the ages; oi aiwves TÔV

aiúvov, the ages of ages; and aibvios, age-long, denote periods not of unlimited

but of limited duration, 201—208. -Inaccurately rendered, world, world without end,

for ever, or, for ever and ever, 208–209.—~ The meanings which these words bear in

the New Testament considered and examined, 209–216. -Capable of denoting dura-

tion without limits when united with a negative particle, 216–217. -Their meaning

indefinite when used to express duration, 217–218. -Ζωή, life, and θάνατος, death

the usage of these terms by the apostolic writers, 218—224.-Theories erected on

the assumption of their being used not in their popular but in a technical sense un-

sound, 224-227.-The meaning which the remaining words used in the New Testa-

ment in connection with future retribution conveyed to the Greek-speaking Christians

in the apostolic Churches, 227–234.

THE SAME SUBJECT AS SET FORTH IN THE GOSPEL AND IN THE EPISTLES OF

Sr. John.
The use of technical terms peculiar to the writings of this Apostle, 272.—The ex-
pression, aiuvos soi, eternal or age-long life, used to denote a condition of man's
moral and spiritual being, not as a future but a present possession, 272-278.--A

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