Proceedings of the Geologists' Association, Band 4

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Geologists' Association, London, 1876
 

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Seite 506 - Bulletin of the United States Geological and Geographical Survey of the Territories.
Seite 103 - Pyramids, into Asia Minor, and across Persia, by Bagdad, to the mouths of the Indus. It occurs not only in Cutch, but in the mountain ranges which separate Scinde from Persia, and which form the passes leading to Caboul; and it has been followed still farther eastward into India, as far as Eastern Bengal and the frontiers of China.
Seite 104 - Globigerince of the chalk differed from those of the existing species. But if this be true, there is no escaping the conclusion that the chalk itself is the dried mud of an ancient deep sea. In working over the soundings collected by Captain Dayman, I was surprised to find that many of what I have called the
Seite 176 - Association, that the foundation of the whole of geological science — that is, the interpretation of the phenomena presented to us in the study of the earth's crust — must be based upon the study of the changes at present going on upon the surface of the earth, of course including the depths of the sea.
Seite 340 - On some of the causes which have helped to shape the land on the North Wales border.
Seite 246 - In his paper on the Loess and Quaternary beds of the North of France and South-east of England, Mr. Prestwich expressed an opinion that the break in the land between France and England was not the result of the last geological change, but that the channel existed at the period of the formation of the Low-level gravels of the Somme and Thames Valleys, and probably at that of the High-level gravels. During a recent visit to the Sangatte Raised Beach, the author recognized fragments of chert in the...
Seite 103 - ... ^~But the slice of chalk presents a totally different appearance when placed under the microscope. The general mass of it is made up of very minute granules ; but, imbedded in this matrix, are innumerable bodies, some smaller and some larger, but, on a rough average, not more than a hundredth of an inch in diameter, having a welldefined shape and structure. A cubic inch of some specimens of chalk may contain hundreds 'of thousands of these bodies, compacted together with incalculable millions...
Seite 29 - It is well worthy of remark, that the arguments from the occurrence of coal-plants and ammonites strengthen each other; the coal-plants rendering the question of light, and the ammonites that of heat, insuperable objections to the admission of any received geological hypothesis to account for the finding of such remains, in situ, in latitudes so high as those of Melville Island, Prince Patrick's Island, and Exmouth Island.
Seite 21 - It is a significant fact, first noticed by WALLACE that, whilst all islands having shallow channels, however broad, separating them from each other, and from not distant continents, give evidence of a former connection in Post-Tertiary times ; on the other hand, islands surrounded by deep water are marked by peculiar faunas. Thus Madagascar, though near the coast of Africa, is separated by a deep sea, and its fauna and flora are singularly distinct. The Galapagos islands have also a peculiar fauna,...
Seite 412 - ON THE GEOLOGY OF NEW ZEALAND WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE DRIFT OF THAT COUNTRY. By Dr. HECTOR, CMG, FRS, Director of the Geological Surrey of New Zealand.

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