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THE

LADIES' MUSEUM

FOR THE YEAR

MDCCCXX X.

VOL. I.

JANUARY TO JUNE.

London:

JAMES ROBINS AND CO. IVY LANE,

PATERNOSTER ROW.

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LADIES MUSEUM,

JANUARY, 1830.

MISS FANNY KEMBLE. This lady is too young, and has been too short a time before the public, to have furnished materials for a lengthened biography. From ber infancy she was destined for that profession of which her parents are distinguished ornaments; and her education was of course sedulously conducted with a view of forming an accomplished actress. Some minds rise, by natural vigour, above the impediinents which a want of early tuition throws in the way of candidates for fame; but in general it will be found that the history of the stage furnishes abundant proof of the advantages which'a finished education affords. Its importance is implied in the necessity which performers of great natural ability lie under of cultivating their intellect, if they wish to retain the impression which a happy genius may incidentally produce. John Kemble was a scholar, and his distinguished sister is one of the most accomplished ladies in England. To the care which has been bestowed ou Miss Kemble's tuition may be attributed some portion of that excellence, which has been so fully recognized by all who have bebeld her performance.

We have heard many anecdotes illustrative of Miss Kemble’s cleverness while at school, and we can have no hesitation in believing that she generally carried off those little stimulants to industry, in the shape of prizes, which able governesses find useful in exciting a laudable rivalry. At the different examinations, the tragic power which was to delight at a future day applauding houses, indicated itself in so remarkable a manner, that it excited tears of joy in the eyes of a fond mother. Her father's lessons were calculated to develop fully her natural capabilities, but though he felt that she could not fail to succeed on the stage, he wisely refrained from giving theatrical gossipers an opportunity of anticipating the decision of the public.

The time for making her debût was well chosen : she bore a "charmed name," and she appeared, as it were, an interesting advocate to plead the cause of a father undeservedly deprived of the fruits of a long and active professional life. The sympathy of the theatrical world had, too, been excited in favour of a popular

Jan. 1830.

B

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