The season-ticket [sketches, by T.C. Haliburton. Univ. magazine].

Cover
F. Warne, 1860 - 330 Seiten
 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Ausgewählte Seiten

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite 335 - Poland, and the little contiguous dynasties, duchies, and domains, have the mumps so severely, that ' the whole head is sick, and the whole heart is faint ; ' Russia has the cramp by lineage ; Turkey has the numb palsy ; Africa, from the curse of God, has lost the use of her limbs ; China is ruined by the queen's evil...
Seite 18 - I plead guilty, and throw myself on the mercy of the Court.
Seite 192 - In Works of Labour or of Skill I would be busy too: For Satan finds some Mischief still For idle Hands to do.
Seite 272 - The noise subsided, and he was asked if he had anything to say why sentence of death should not be passed upon him.
Seite 338 - A city had been laid out upon a magnificent scale, being nearly four miles in length and three in breadth ; the streets at right angles with each other, eight rods or one hundred and thirty-two feet wide, with sidewalks of twenty feet ; the blocks forty rods square, divided into eight lots, each of which contains an acre and a-quarter of ground.
Seite 336 - asylum for the oppressed,' has boosted, and is boosting up into the council chamber of the government, a clique of political gamblers, to play for the old clothes and old shoes of a sick world, and ' no pledge, no promise, to any particular portion of the people...
Seite 335 - Why, Sir, the condition of the whole earth is lamentable. Texas dreads the teeth and toenails of Mexico. Oregon has the rheumatism, brought on by a horrid exposure to the heat and cold of British and American trappers ; Canada has caught a bad cold from extreme fatigue in the patriot war ; South America has the headache, caused by bumps against the beams of Catholicity and Spanish sovereignty ; Spain has the gripes from age NAUVOO.
Seite 81 - I'll tell you what I did. When I was standin' on my head on the top of that are pole, I jist raised myself up a little with my arms, opened my jaws, put my teeth to it, and pulled it right up out of the ground, and then jumped down, with one end of it in my mouth.
Seite 37 - De buckwheat-cake was in her mouth, De tear was in her eye; Says I, I'm coming from de South, Susanna, don't you cry.

Bibliografische Informationen