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The Grave of Charles Lamb, . . 316

Prosaic Words, 319

Robert Story 322

The Loves of Old Ladies, ... 420

Medicine and Physiology, . . . 463

The Works of Winthrop Mackworth Praed, 600

Saying Disagreeable Things, . . 606

The Sources of French Literature, . 612

London Review.

The Lnggio,

Cannibalism,

Immigration in the West Indies, .
Railway Travelling.—Effect on Health,

Yachting

Coal Tar Colors,

Black Lead

High Balloon Ascent

Recognition of the South, . . .
Forgery of Bank of England Notes,

Mummies,

Diirklieim.—The Grape Cure,

Athenteum.
Letters of Mrs. Piozzi to Mr. Conway,

Once A Week.

Join Hands-*-Leave Nobodv out, . . 6

What I heard at the Coffee'-Party, . 15

Medusa and her Locks, ... 24

Good Words.

Mistress and Maid, 30, 78, 111, 154, 206, 293

364, 545, 579

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Mistress and Maid, 30, 78, 111, 154, 206, 293

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Salem Chapel,

What I Heard at the Coffee-Party, . 15

Water Babies, The, . . 390, 450, 495

TO THE READERS OF THE "LIVING AGE."

This number of The Living Age concludes the second year of its war trials and perils.
These have been severe, and have called for all possible economy; — but they have been
less than might have been anticipated.

The loss of all subscribers in the rebel States has been followed by a great scarcity of
stock for making paper, and this has obliged the newspaper press to increase its price.
The Living Age has suffered under the tyranny of King Cotton, as have all other
periodicals.

It is a strong proof of the steady attachment of the readers of The Living Age,—and
a proof for which we are very grateful,—that more than nine-tenths of our subscribers in
the loyal States have stood by us through this "year of famine."

We have not been without anxieties, so that every letter enclosing a remittance is
received as a special encouragement and personal favor.

May we venture so far as to ask every man who thinks well of the work (now approach-
ing its thousandth number, and concluding its seventy-fifth volume) to take so much per-
sonal trouble as to induce one or more of his neighbors to order it, and thus to "fill up
the old regiments."

Number 969, which is printed on the cover this week, is the number of years to which
Methuselah attained. We do not expect to live so long, — though we cannot but think
how valuable a series of the Antediluvian Age he might have published, at the rate of
four volumes to a year. If we can complete twenty-five more volumes of our Living Age,
so as to make up an invaluable set of one hundred volumes, we shall be abundantly satis-
fied, and shall feel that we have left to posterity, as Milton said, a work " which it will
not willingly" leave unread.

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