Shakespeare's Tragedy of Macbeth: With Introduction, and Notes Explanatory and Critical. for Use in Schools and Classes

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Ginn, Heath & Company, 1883 - 203 Seiten
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Seite 81 - Mine eyes are made the fools o' the other senses, Or else worth all the rest : I see thee still ; And on thy blade, and dudgeon,* gouts of blood, Which was not so before. — There's no such thing ; It is the bloody business, which informs Thus to mine eyes.
Seite 75 - Was the hope drunk, Wherein you dress'd yourself ? hath it slept since, And wakes it now, to look so green and pale At what it did so freely ? From this time Such I account thy love. Art thou afeard To be the same in thine own act and valour As thou art in desire ? Wouldst thou have that Which thou esteem'st the ornament of life, And live a coward in thine own esteem, Letting " I dare not" wait upon " I would," Like the poor cat i
Seite 84 - Who was it that thus cried ? Why, worthy thane, You do unbend your noble strength, to think So brainsickly of things : — Go, get some water, And wash this filthy witness from your hand. — Why did you bring these daggers from -the place ? They must lie there : go carry them ; and smear The sleepy grooms with blood. Macb. . I'll go no more : I am afraid to think what I have done ; Look on't again, I dare not.
Seite 191 - Nature seems dead, and wicked dreams abuse The curtain'd sleep; witchcraft celebrates Pale Hecate's offerings, and wither'd murder, Alarum'd by his sentinel, the wolf, Whose howl's his watch, thus with his stealthy pace. With Tarquin's ravishing strides, towards his design Moves like a ghost. Thou sure and firm-set earth, Hear not my steps, which way they walk, for fear Thy very stones prate of my whereabout, And take the present horror from the time, Which now suits with it.
Seite 96 - Whatever withdraws us from the power of our senses ; whatever makes the past, the distant, or the future predominate over the present, advances us in the dignity of thinking beings. Far from me and from my friends be such frigid philosophy, as may conduct us indifferent and unmoved over any ground which has been dignified by wisdom, bravery, or virtue. That man is little to be envied, whose patriotism would not gain force upon the plain of Marathon, or whose piety would not grow warmer among the...
Seite 105 - Duncan is in his grave; After life's fitful fever he sleeps well; Treason has done his worst: nor steel, nor poison, Malice domestic, foreign levy, nothing Can touch him further.
Seite 146 - I shall do so ; But I must also feel it as a man : I cannot but remember such things were, That were most precious to me. Did heaven look on, And would not take their part ? Sinful Macduff, They were all struck for thee ! naught that I am, Not for their own demerits, but for mine, Fell slaughter on their souls : Heaven rest them now ! Mai.
Seite 76 - Like the poor cat i' the adage? MACB. Prithee, peace. I dare do all that may become a man; Who dares do more is none. LADY M. What beast was't, then, That made you break this enterprise to me? When you durst do it, then you were a man; And, to be more than what you were, you would Be so much more the man. Nor time nor place Did then adhere, and yet you would make both. They have made themselves, and that their fitness now Does unmake you. I have given suck, and know How tender...
Seite 130 - Tis two or three, my lord, that bring you word, Macduff is fled to England. Macb. Fled to England ? Len. Ay, my good lord. Macb. Time, thou anticipat'st my dread exploits : The flighty purpose never is o'ertook, Unless the deed go with it : from this moment, The very firstlings of my heart shall be The firstlings of my hand.
Seite 145 - Merciful heaven ! — What, man ! ne'er pull your hat upon your brows; Give sorrow words : the grief that does not speak Whispers the o'erfraught heart, and bids it break.

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