Report of Progress - Geological Survey of Canada

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Geological Survey of Canada, 1872
Contents of each report may be found in "List of publications of the Geological survey of Canada. 1906."
 

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Page 277 - The attempts frequently made to enhance the value of the stock by declaring dividends, sometimes paid out of capital, but often by means of a process commonly known as " picking the eyes out of the mine...
Page 175 - ... conglomerate having a red slaty paste filled with large subangular fragments of a grey altered rock, like the lower slate of the Coldbrook group. It also contains fragments of reddish sandstone and a few pieces of impure slaty limestone. The conglomerate is overlaid by thick beds of purple clay slate, which by the accession of coarser materials becomes a slaty sandstone and grit filled with white particles. The highest member on the line of section is a slaty conglomerate holding fragments of...
Page 62 - Works the rocks of the more northerly anticlinal ridge present the following succession : — Hard greenish-grey petrosilicious rock, with very obscure stratification ; conglomerate with bright red slaty paste ; grey conglomerate ; coarse reddish grit and conglomerate, with purple sandstone : apparent thickness of the whole, 5,000 feet. From the Coldbrook valley, through which the above strata (which are chiefly of Nos. 3 and 4) pass northward to the valley of Hammond...
Page 342 - The timber consists mostly of spruce, balsam-fir, white ce.dar, tamarack, white birch and aspen. Some of the larger spruces and tamaracks measured between five and six feet in girth at five feet from the ground ; but the average diameter of the larger trees would be about eighteen inches. In the last twenty or thirty miles explored, the ground became swampy on going back to a short distance from the river on either side, the timber consisting of small spruces, cedars and tamaracks. The...
Page 278 - The disregard of the natural features of the ground, shown in locating the crushing and dressing machinery without reference to the easy delivery of the material from the mine and the fall required for the perfect treatment of the ores, and for getting rid of the tailings.
Page 135 - The actual thickness, however, may be much less than this, for while there are numerous faults and folds for which allowance is made in the above estimate, a repetition of similar sediments on either side of the trough of these rocks upon which the city of St. John stands, would appear to indicate that the entire series, with the undei lying Huronian strata, is here folded upon itself in a sharp synclinal, overturned to Overturn, the northwest. In this case, the aggregate thickness of the series,...
Page 291 - Bands of crystalline limestone are easily distinguished from bands of gneiss, but it is scarcely possible to know, from mere local inspection, whether any mass of limestone in one part is equivalent to a certain mass in another. They all resemble one another more or less lithologically, and although masses are met with, running for considerable distances rudely parallel to one another, it is not yet INVESTIGATIONS OF SIR W. LOGAN'.
Page 282 - ... manufacture." Concerning the use of formaldehyde. — " Inasmuch as milk, of all ordinary foods, is the most prone to deterioration and requires the most careful treatment, the temptation to use such an efficient preservative as formaldehyde is proportionately greater, especially during the summer months. " It seems not out of place to call attention to the fact that apart from the injurious effects of formaldehyde itself its use as a preservative would be especially inadvisable in milk or cream,...

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