Glances at the Forests of Northern Europe: By the Rev. J.C. Brown, LL.D.

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J. and W. Rider, 1879 - 62 Seiten
 

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Seite 20 - The Lord possessed me in the beginning of his way, before his works of old. I was set up from everlasting, from the beginning, or ever the earth was. When there were no depths, I was brought forth ; when there were no fountains abounding with water. Before the mountains were settled, before the hills was I brought forth : while as yet he had not made the earth, nor the fields, nor the highest part of the dust of the world.
Seite 20 - When he prepared the heavens, I was there : when He set a compass upon the face of the depth : when He established the clouds above: when He strengthened the fountains of the deep : when He gave to the sea His decree, that the waters should not pass His commandment; when He appointed the foundations of the earth : then I was by Him as one brought up with Him; and I was daily His delight, rejoicing always before him: rejoicing in the habitable part of His earth; and my delights were with the sons...
Seite 14 - Denmark, and eighteen centuries seem to have done little or nothing towards modifying the character of the forest vegetation. Yet in the antecedent bronze period there were no beech trees, or at most but a few stragglers, the country being then covered with oak. In the age of stone again, the Scotch fir prevailed, and already there were human inhabitants in those old pine forests. How many generations of each species of tree flourished in succession before the pine was supplanted by the oak, and...
Seite 19 - And God said, Let the earth bring forth grass, the herb yielding seed, and the fruit tree yielding fruit after his kind, whose seed is in itself, upon the earth : and it was so.
Seite 14 - Scattered all through them are flint knives, hatchets, and other instruments of stone, horn, wood, and bone, with fragments of coarse pottery, mixed with charcoal and cinders, but never any implements of bronze, still less of iron.
Seite 13 - Denmark coincided with the period of the first vegetation, or that of the Scotch fir, and in part at least with the second vegetation, or that of the oak. But a considerable portion of the oak epoch coincided with the age of bronze...
Seite 15 - Scotch fir (Pinus silvestris), often three feet in diameter, which must have grown on the margin of the peat-mosses, and have frequently fallen into them. This tree is not now, nor has ever been in historical times, a native of the Danish islands, and when introduced there has not thriven...
Seite 15 - Scotch fir was afterwards supplanted by the sessile variety of the common oak, of which many prostrate trunks occur in the peat at higher levels than the pines. And still higher, the pedunculated variety of the same oak (Quercus Robur L.), occurs with the alder, birch (Betula verrucas* Ehrh.), and hazel.
Seite 13 - Worsaae, and others, have succeeded in establishing a chronological succession of periods, which they have called the ages of stone, of bronze, and of iron, named from the materials which have each in their turn served for the fabrication of implements.
Seite 14 - In the time of the Romans the Danish Isles were covered, as now, with magnificent beech forests. Nowhere in the world does this tree flourish more luxuriantly than in Denmark, and eighteen centuries seem to have done little or nothing towards modifying the character of the forest vegetation. Yet in the antecedent bronze period there were no beech trees, or at most but a few stragglers, the country being then covered with oak. In the age of stone again, the Scotch fir prevailed (see p.

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