History of Europe from the Fall of Napoleon in 1815 to the Accession of Louis Napoleon in 1852, Band 7

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Real explanation of his conduct
10
His views on the Currency
11
Explanation thus afforded of his political career
12
His character in private life
13
Formation of the new Ministry
14
Immense difficulties of the country in foreign affairs
15
Still darker prospect in internal affairs
16
Statistical details proving the distress
17
Immense difficulties in finance and from the inadequate national arma
18
19 Great distress in the manufacturing districts 23 20 Serious riots in England in autumn 1842
22
Their effects and results of the strike
23
Skilful use made of these circumstances
24
Opposite arguments adduced by the AntiCornLaw League and real causes of the distress
25
Short session of 1841
31
The Ministerial plan
38
The bill passes both Houses and various amendments are thrown out
42
Reception of the measure in the country
43
Financial difficulties of Sir R Peel ib 4348 Sir R Peels speech on introducing his financial measures 4448
44
VOL VII
49
5054 Argument against the incometax 5053
50
The bill passes and its reception by the country
54
Reflections on the Tariff and reasons for it
55
It might have been easily obviated by an extension of the Currency
56
The incometax was justifiable
57
But this made the tax on perishable incomes more unjust ib 60 Reasous of this injustice being committed
58
Peels heroic conduct on the Affghanistan disaster
59
Reflections on this Act
61
Lord Mahons Copyright Bill
62
The Temperance Movement in Ireland
63
Progress and decline of the movement
64
19
65
Monster meetings
68
Character of these meetings and language used at them 16
69
The Clontarf meeting is stopped and OConnell arrested
71
Trial and conviction of OConnell
72
Reversal of the sentence 74 Effects of this decision 75 His subsequent career and death
74
Fine harvest of 1842 and gradual improvement in the country in 1843
77
Parliamentary measures of 1843 Lord Ashleys Bills for Infant Labour
78
Sir James Grahams unsuccessful Factory and Education Bill
79
New Factory Bill and Lord Ashleys Tenhours amendment
80
110
81
Reflections on this subject
82
Rebecca riots
83
Increase of the riots
85
Differences with America
87
Question of the right of search
88
The question is settled by Lord Aberdeen
90
Its origin
91
Proceedings regarding the dispute
93
Terms of the treaty and its reception in Great Britain
94
Reflections on it
95
Its history
96
Conclusion of a treaty
97
Its terms
99
Reflections on these Treaties
100
Origin of the Otaheite dispute with France ib 98 Interference of the French missionaries
101
Spanish marriages
102
Reduction of the 34 per cents
103
Favourable financial statement of 1844
108
Reduction of Sugar Duties
109
Bank Charter Act
110
108111 Sir R Peels argument in support of his Bill 112113 Argument against the Bill 114 The Bill passes both Houses
114
Similar bills for Scotland and Ireland
115
Reflections on this debate
116
What was not foreseen
117
Visit of the King of the French to England
118
Visit of the Emperor Nicholas
119
Political objects of the visit
120
120
121
CHAPTER XLII
124
313
125
Public prosperity and the railway mania 2 The Railway Mania
126
Beneficial effect of the railway system on the working classes I Bill passes reducing railway deposits to a half 12 Its vast effect in stimulating these un...
147
Charge against Sir James Grabam of opening letters
160
First appearance of the potato rot
167
Failure of Lord John Russell to form a government and restoration of
175
Reception of the measure in the country
184
Result of the debate
192
24
197
126
198
25
200
The bill is thrown out by a majority of
207
Was a return to the Corn Laws after the famine was over practicable ?
213
27
217
The Duke of Wellingtons characteristic conduct 220
220
ENGLAND FROM THE INTRODUCTION OF FREE TRADE AND FALL OF SIR R PEEL IN JUNE 1846 TO THE SUPPRESSION OF THE CHAR...
225
Both the Whigs and the Tories were destroyed by their own leaders
226
Causes which led to these changes
227
Formation of the new Cabinet
228
58 Government plan for the sugarduties 229232
229
Argument of the Protectionists on the other side 233239
233
Sir R Peels singular conduct and passing of the bill
239
Result of this measure to the West Indies
240
Effect on the slave trade
242
Explanation of this given by foreign writers
243
Real explanation of it
244
Proof of the colonies having been disfranchised by the Reform Bill
245
Reflections on this subject
249
Difference in the composition of the British and foreign armies
250
Necessity of corporal punishment in the field
251
Lord Palmerstons Cabinet minute on the defences of the country
252
Wellingtons measure for enrolling the pensioners
255
Arms bill for Ireland
256
Sir R Peels measures for the relief of the Irish suffering and those of Lord J Russell
258
Commencement of the Irish famine
259
Deplorable and alarming state of the country
261
Government plans on the subject
262
Enormous extent of the distress
264
Woeful scenes in the country
265
Her Majestys speech on opening Parliament
266
Ministerial plan for the Irish relief
267
Description of the calamity by Lord Brougham
268
Ministerial plan for the relief of Ireland
269
Amended Poor and Temporary Relief Act 10 and 11 Victoria c 7
270
Immense relief afforded under this Act in Ireland
272
127
273
Great mortality of this period
274
Immense pecuniary efforts made in Great Britain
275
Vast extent of the emigration from Ireland
276
130
277
Still greater emigration to foreign parts in parts 47 Effects of this exodus on the Irish population 48 Which arose mainly from freetrade measures
280
132
281
Voluntary relief in Ireland and causes of its small amount
282
Reflections on the Irish famine
283
Lord George Bentincks project for Irish railways
286
Division on the subject and reflections on
294
Its details
300
Nothing followed on this debate
313
The bill passes both Houses
320
29
323
Public education
326
30
331
Increased monetary pressure in August
332
138
337
Meeting of Parliament and Queens Speech
339
Good effects of this success
366
Commencement of the Chartist insurrection
367
Preparations of the Chartists
368
Vigorous preparations in the Government
369
Defeat of the Chartists
372
Detection of the frauds in the Chartist petition
373
Immense sensation this produced on the Continent
374
Renewed agitation by the Chartists and its suppression and their trials
375
Preparations for a rebellion in Ireland
376
Total defeat of the rebellion
378
140
379
Immense effects of the monetary crisis of 1847
382
Lesson which it taught the British people
383
142143 144
384
146
386
147
388
Danger of gold passing merely through the richer States
390
149
391
150
392
152
394
The very opposite effects have followed ib 153 Way in which the monetary laws inflamed speculation
395
Ultimate effects of Free Trade irrespective of the Currency
396
Capital facilitates manufactures far more than agriculture
397
Everything that is plentiful becomes cheap
398
Greater mortality of cities than rural districts
399
Manner in which these circumstances arrest population
400
Effect of these laws combined
401
402
402
Free Trade was forced upon Sir R Peel 162 Effects of this system on national progress and independence
406
Protection must continue to be the policy of young and growing states
407
Which is the result on their part of necessity
408
The effects of Free Trade must be judged of before 1852
409
Necessity of maritime superiority to the present existence of Britain
411
FRANCE FROM THE TREATY OF FEBRUARY 13 1841 TO THE DEATH OF
413
Speech of M Thiers 702
418
Increasing discontent of the working classes
419
Corruption and influence became the great engine of Government
427
Different object on which the attention of Government was set
433
Reflections on this debate
439
Commencement of combination and riot in Paris
446
Untoward commencement of the Ministry of M Guizot
452
His fate as a Minister
499
Corruption of the Ministerial majority in the Chamber
506
WARS OF THE FRENCH IN ALGERIA FROM THE REVOLT UNDER ABDELKADER
511
Exports and imports
517
Canrobert
523
The Zouaves
529
Campaign of 1841
535
Commencement of difficulties with Marocco
541
Critical position of the French and their resolution to fight
547
Capitulation of AbdelKader and its violation by the French
553
444
556
Injurious influence of the Jews
576
Recapture of Cracow
583
Mode in which he effected his escape
590
Repeal of the Salic law and opening of the Spanish throne to queens
597
Intrigue for the simultaneous marriage of the Queen and Infanta which
603
Lord Palmerstons letter of 19th July to Sir H Bulwer
605
Its effects on the future of France and England
611
Cordiality of France and England before the affair of the Spanish marriages
617
Affairs at Madrid and alienation of the King and Queen
623
First acts of the Pope
629
Conduct of the French Government
635
Great reforms introduced into Piedmont
641
Publication of a constitution at Naples
647
Progress of democratic influences in
653
Proceedings of the great Council against the Sunderbund
658
Policy of France and Austria at this crisis ib 96 Preparations for civil war
659
Policy of Lord Palmerston to support the Radicals
660
Divergence of Lord Palmerstons policy on the question
662
Disastrous effect of this divergence
663
Lord Palmerston delays to join in the French and Austrian intervention
664
Easy success of the Radicals ib 104 The tardy mediation of the five powers is declined
668
Formation of a league against Great Britain
669
Weakness of Great Britain at sea and land at this period
670
Reflections on the extraordinary disproportion of the danger and means of resistance
671
The completeness of revolution in one country and its incompleteness in the other occasioned the difference
672
CHAPTER XLVII
673
23 Prince de Joinvilles letter to the Duke de Nemours 674675
674
Views of the King on the subject
676
Deficiency of the crops in 1845 and 1846
677
Failure of the potato crop in 1846 and monetary crisis
678
Financial state of 1847 and great loans contracted for by the Government
679
Enlarged issue of banknotes
680
General corruption in the Government departments
682
Events which brought it to light
683
Revelation of further scandal
684
Result of the trial and conviction of the accused
685
Murder of the Duchess of Praslin
686
Details of the catastrophe and its termination
687
Use made of these abuses by the Revolutionists
689
Cry for Parliamentary Reform
690
Discontent of the National Guard
692
Commencement of the banquet agitation
694
Durergier dHaurannes speech
695
de Lamartines speech at Maçon
696
Efforts of the Liberals to keep back the Socialists
697
de Lamartines ulterior views
698
Decline of the banquet agitation in the end of the year
699
Meeting of the Chambers and Kings Speech
700
2930 Speech of M de Tocqueville 703704
703
Speech of M de Lamartine
705
Duchâtels answer 706710
706
Discussion on the Address
711
Divisions on the Address ib 41 The Opposition resolve on a banquet
712
Great agitation in Paris on the announcement
714
Death of the Princess Adelaide i
715
Programme of the proposed procession
716
Difficulties on both sides regarding a procession 16
718
Articles in the National and Réforme on the subject
719
Strength of the Republicans at this period
720
Forces of the Government and its measures
721
Aspect of the people
722
Insidious policy of the National Guard
723
The National Guard in effect join the insurgents
724
Consternation in the Tuileries
726
Resignation of M Guizot 56 Announcement of this to the Chambers and its reception in Paris
728
Catastrophe in front of M Guizots house 58 Parade of the dead bodies through Paris
730
Thiers is sent for
731
Excessive agitation in Paris during the night
732
Marshal Bugeauds success
733
Thiers and Odillion Barrot succumb and withdraw the troops
734
Ruinous consequences of this concession
735
Abandonment of the Palais Royal
737
The King is forced to abdicate
738
Proceedings of the generals at this time and flight of the King
740
Heroic conduct of the Duchess of Orléans
742
Opinion in the Chamber of Deputies
743
Treachery of M de Lamartine
744
Entrance of the Duchess of Orléans into the Chambers ib 73 She is refused a hearing and obliged by the mob to retire
746
Nomination of the Provisional Government
747
Nomination of another Provisional Government and proclamation of a Republic
748
Lamartines portrait of the Revolutionists
749
Escape of the Duchess of Orléans and the Royal Family
750
Causes which brought about the Revolution
752

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Seite 336 - If this course should lead to any infringement of the existing law, Her Majesty's Government will be prepared to propose to Parliament on its meeting, a Bill of Indemnity.
Seite 187 - I did place myself at the head of this valiant armada; true it is that my sovereign embraced me; true it is that all the muftis in the empire offered up prayers for my success ; but I have an objection to war.
Seite 186 - ... when the existence of the Turkish empire was at stake, the late sultan, a man of great energy and fertile in resources, was determined to fit out an immense fleet to maintain his empire. Accordingly, a vast armament was collected.
Seite 211 - Protection, considering the maintenance of it to be essential to the welfare and interests of the country. I shall leave a name execrated by every monopolist, who, from less honourable motives, clamours for Protection because it conduces to his own individual benefit.
Seite 208 - Two hours after this intelligence was brought, we were ejected from power ; and by another coincidence as marvellous, on the day on which I had to announce in the House of Commons the dissolution of the Government, the news arrived that we had settled the Oregon question, and that our proposals had been accepted by the United States without the alteration of a word.
Seite 267 - Means have been taken to lessen the pressure of want in districts which are most remote from the ordinary sources of supply. Outrages have been repressed, as far as it was possible, by the military and police. It is satisfactory to me to observe, that in many of the most distressed districts the patience and resignation of the people have been most exemplary.
Seite 176 - I have had," her Majesty was made to say," great satisfaction in giving my assent to the measures which you have presented to me from time to time, calculated to extend commerce and to stimulate domestic skill and industry, by the repeal of prohibitive and the relaxation of protective duties. I recommend you to take into your early consideration whether the principle on which you have acted may not with advantage be yet more extensively applied.
Seite 266 - For, faithful in death, his mute favourite attended, The much-loved remains of her master defended, And chased the hill-fox and the raven away. How long didst thou think that his silence was slumber ? When the wind waved his...
Seite 91 - But with this single exception no nation has, in time of peace, any authority to detain the ships of another upon the high seas on any pretext whatever, beyond the limits of the territorial jurisdiction.

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