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Seite 35 - God that gave it, and my body to the earth from whence it was taken, to be buried in a decent and Christian burial at the discretion of my Executors...
Seite 144 - The muffled drum's sad roll has beat The soldier's last tattoo; No more on life's parade shall meet That brave and fallen few. On fame's eternal camping ground Their silent tents are spread, And glory guards, with solemn round, The bivouac of the dead.
Seite 83 - After traveling for several days in this desperate condition, with lacerated feet, and utter prostration of mind and body, they began to disagree among themselves about the route to be pursued, and eventually separated into two distinct parties. Five of these unhappy men steered a westward course, and after a succession of sufferings and privations, which almost surpassed belief, they reached the settlements of the Creek Indians, near the Arkansas River, where they were treated with great kindness...
Seite 83 - ... for the start; and, mounting their horses, kept jogging on in the same direction. The first act of hostility perpetrated by the Indians proved fatal to one of the American traders named Pratt, who was shot dead while attempting to secure two mules which had become separated from the rest Upon this, the companions of the slain man immediately dismounted and commenced a fire upon the Indians, which was warmly returned, whereby another man of the name of Mitchell was killed. By this time the traders...
Seite 82 - ... with the adjacent plains and appear entirely of a similar formation, indicate that the intermediate earth has been washed away or removed by some other process of nature — all seeming to give plausibility to our theory. It was somewhere in this vicinity that a small party of Americans experienced a terrible calamity in the winter of...
Seite 140 - ... private individuals. Indeed it would be monstrous if, after a possession such as has been proved in this case, for a period of nearly a century and a half, open, notorious, and within sight of the temple of justice, the successive claimants, save one, being men of full age, and the courts open to them all the time (except for seven years of war and revolution), the title to lands were to be litigated successfully upon a claim which has been suspended for five generations. Few titles in this country...
Seite 83 - Often did they look back in the direction where from three to five hundred savages were supposed to watch their movements, but, much to their astonishment, no one appeared to be in pursuit. The Indians believing, no doubt, that the property of the traders would come into their hands, and having no amateur predilection for taking...
Seite 83 - Indians had complete command of all the water within reach. Starvation was not so much to be dreaded ; because, in case of necessity, they could live on the flesh of their slain animals, some of which lay stretched close around them. After being pent up for thirtysix hours in this horrible hole, during which time they had seldom ventured to raise their heads above the surface without being shot at, they resolved to make a bold sortie in the night, as any death was preferable to the fate which awaited...
Seite 83 - ... with great kindness and hospitality. The other five wandered about in the greatest state of distress and bewilderment, and only two finally succeeded in getting out of the mazes of the wilderness. Among those who were abandoned to their fate, and left to perish thus miserably, was a Mr. Schenck, the same individual who had been shot in the thigh; a gentleman of talent and excellent family connections, who was a brother, as I am informed, of the Hon. Mr. Schenck, at present a member of Congress...
Seite 139 - I feel bound to say, that a plainer case has never been presented to me as a judge. Were it not for the uncommon magnitude of the claim, the apparent sincerity and zeal of the counsel who supported it, and the fact, (of which I have been oftentimes admonished, by personal applications on their behalf,) that the descendants of Anneke Jans, at this day, are hundreds, if not thousands, in number ; I should not have deemed it necessary to deliver a written judgment on deciding the cause.

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