A Guide to Elementary Chemistry for Beginners

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Ivison, Blakeman,, 1886 - Chemistry - 292 pages
 

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Page 122 - Avogadro's law states that equal volumes of all gases at the same temperature and pressure contain the same number of molecules...
Page 118 - Al Sb A As Ba Be Bi B Br Cd Cs Ca C Ce Cl Cr Co Cu...
Page 118 - Re Rh Rb Ru Sm Sc Se Si Ag Na Sr S Ta Te Tb Tl Th Tm Sn Ti W U V Xe Yb Y Zn Zr...
Page 71 - Fig. 13, and after a minute I put the rod s into the open hole of the cork. I have now imprisoned a tubeful of air ; none can get out, and no more can get in. I left the hole in the cork open, because if it were not open the pressure of the cork would crowd the air below, and there would be too much in the tube; and then, too, handling the tube warmed it, and the volume of air changes with heat.
Page vi - ... guarantee happiness, neither can a superfluity of learning insure wisdom. When the body from overfeeding grows plethoric its vital energies subside and its life is endangered. The intellect may be mischievously crammed with science. How much we know is not the best question, but how we got what we know, and what we can do with it; and, above all, what it has made of us.
Page 64 - Return the dregs to the flask and macerate them with two hundred grammes of a mixture of alcohol and water made in the proportion . of one part of alcohol to three parts of water ; repeat the maceration 2 or 3 times successively, with fresh portions of the mixture, until the dregs are tasteless or nearly so. Mix the liquids thus obtained, and concentrate them by means of a water- bath (the...
Page 70 - There is a pinch-cock, p, by which its walls may be pinched so us to close it completely. F is a small glass funnel. The lower end of h I stretch over the tube in the cork c, and its upper end I fix over the stem of F, and then I place the funnel in the clamp of the support, as shown in Fig. 12, and remove the rod к.
Page 55 - Now, it has been already shown that water is composed of two volumes of hydrogen and one volume of oxygen ; and...
Page iv - I have therefore tried to make a judicious selection of the most fundamental facts and principles of chemistry, and to present these in such a way that the student must constantly use his senses to discover facts, his reason in drawing correct inferences from the data he collects, and good English in expressing accurately what he sees and thinks.
Page 131 - Salt is a compound formed by putting a metal in the place of the hydrogen of an add; that is, an acid differs from a salt simply in having a metal where the acid has hydrogen. Every acid has a salt corresponding to it. For example, as stated above, nitric acid consists of nitrogen and oxygen and hydrogen. Now if we put the metal potassium in the place of hydrogen...

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