Cements, limes, and plasters: their materials, manufacture, and properties

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J. Wiley & Sons, 1905 - Cement - 712 pages
 

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Contents

Sizes capacity etc of Stedman disintegrators
36
G Temperatures in cementplaster manufacture
44
Sizes capacity etc of Broughton mixers
50
Analyses of rock gypsum used for plaster
53
Analyses of gypsite gypsum earth used for plaster
54
CHAPTER m
56
Analyses of plaster of Paris
57
Analyses of cementplasters
58
Fineness of plasters tested
59
Tensile strength of plasters
60
Effect of sand on compressive strength of plasters
63
Rate of set and hardening
64
Effect of retarders on strength of plasters
65
Effect of various retarders on rate of set of plasters
66
Effect of accelerators on rate of set of plasters
67
CHAPTER IV
68
Hardfinish plasters
76
Tensile strength of Keenes cement
78
Total imports and production of gypsum in U S 19001903
79
Gypsum production of the U S by uses 18901903
80
Gypsum production of the U S by States 19021903
82
Production by States 18901901
83
Imports of gypsum and plaster 19001903
84
Imports of gypsum and plaster by countries 19001903
87
Varieties of limestone
89
Geologic and geographic distribution of limestones
91
Analyses of various molluscan shells
95
Methods and costs of limeburning
98
Heat and fuel required in burning lime
99
Sizes capacity etc of Keystone lime kilns
106
Cost of lime manufacture during 1900 in ten States
111
Elements of cost of lime manufacture in percentages
112
Lime production of the U S by States 19021903
113
CHAPTER VIII
115
Analyses of highcalcium limes
116
Analyses of lean limes
118
Analyses of magnesian limes
119
Use of lime mortars
121
Tensile strength of magnesium and highcalcium limes
122
Tensile strength of lime mortars
123
Sizes capacity etc of Sturtevant crushers
125
Capacity power etc of Campbell limehydrater
126
Standaids for packing etc
128
Percentage composition of various lime silicates
133
General processes of limesand brick manufacture
134
Effect of fineness of sand on limesand brick
135
Comparative tests of magnesian and highcalcium lime bricks
136
Effect of percentage of lime on limesand brick
138
Effect of hardening methods on limesand brick
139
Comparison of limesand bricks and natural sandstone
142
Physical tests of limesand brick
143
143 55 Compressive strength of limesand brick
144
Summary of tests of limesand brick
145
Summary of tests of natural sandstones
146
MAGNESIA AND OXYCHLORIDE CEMENTS
148
Analyses of magnesite from Quebec Canada
152
Production of magnesite in U S 18911903
153
Analyses of calcined magnesite magnesia
155
Magnesian limestones as sources of magnesia
156
Analyses of highly magnesian limestones U S
157
Analyses of magnesia bricks
161
Expansion of magnesia bricks on heating
162
Compressive strength of Sorel stone
166
HYDRAULIC LIMES SELENITIC LIMES
168
Eminently hydraulic limes
174
Composition of ideal hydraulic limestone and hydraulic lime
175
Analyses of hydraulic limestones of Teil France
176
Analyses of beds in hydrauliclime quarries at Malain France
177
Analyses of hydraulic lime before slaking Teil France
179
Analyses of kiln products Teil France
182
Average strength of hydraulic limes
183
Compressive strength of hydrauliclime mortar
184
Grappier cements
185
Tensile strength of Lafarge grappier cement
186
Analyses of feebly hydraulic limestones
188
4 Tensile strength of feebly hydraulic limes
189
Tensile strength of selenitic limes
191
Compressive strength of selenitic limes
192
NATURAL CEMENTS
194
Cementation Index of natural cements
196
8S Analyses of naturalcement rock Utica 111
204
Fort Scott Kansas
205
CumberlandHancock Md
206
liosendale district X Y
208
Central X Y
209
AkronBuffalo X Y
210
Xorth Dakota
211
Lehigh district Pa
212
Milwaukee district Wis
213
European naturalcement rocks
214
England
217
References on naturalcement rock
221
Fuel consumption in American naturalcement plants
234
Grinding the clinker
236
Power required in grinding natural cement
246
Fineness required by various specifications
247
Packing weights
248
Estimate of cost of naturalcement manufacture
249
Daily cost report of naturalcement plant
250
09 Analvses of natural cements Ga
253
Ft Scott Kans
254
Potomac district Md
255
Ho Rosendalc district X Y
256
llf Central X Y
258
Xorth Dakota
259
ShepherdstnAntictam district W Va Md
260
natural Portland cements Belgium
261
Germany and Austria
262
Physical properties of natural cements
263
Effect of aeration on setting time of natural cement
264
tensile strength of natural cement
265
Compressive tests of natural cements
269
sand
273
strength of 4inch naturalcement cubes
275
Relation of tensile to compressive strength of naturalcement
276
Modulus of elasticity
277
Engineer Corps United States Army 1901
279
Fineness required by various specifications
282
Strength
283
Summary of naturalcement tests 18971900
284
CHAPTER XXIII
307
Analvses of hard limestones used in American cementplants
314
Chalk and other soft limestones
318
pure chalks
321
Cement rock of the Lehigh district
324
Hudson sliale and slate in Pa and X J
325
Trenton limestones
326
Kittatinny magnesian limestone
327
cementrock
329
Origin of marl deposits
330
Cement rock in other states
332
Analyses of cementrock materials from the Western U S
333
Geographic distribution of marl deposits
339
Fineness of crude marl
340
Analyses of marls used in American cementplants
342
List of references on marls
346
alkali waste ammonia process
349
ironfurnace slags
351
CHAPTER XXVII
353
normal clays used in American cementplants
355
limey 3 50
356
normal shales
357
limey
359
Examination of clay deposits
360
American roofing slates
364
Analyses of slate used for Portland cement Rockmart Ga
365
CHAPTER XXVIII
367
Detailed costs of steamshovel work
373
Mining
375
CHAPTER XXIX
382
Effect of alumina
388
Influence of intentionally added fluxes
390
Composition of actual mixes
394
Analysea of fuel ash
396
Change in composition during burning
397
CHAPTER XXX
398
Methods used with slag limestone mixtures
411
General crushing practice in cement plants
422
Fineness of raw mix at various plants
425
CHAPTER XXXV
429
Sizes power etc of Gates crushers
433
Millstones
437
Sizes power etc of Griffin mill
442
Ball grinders
447
Sizes weights etc of Gates ball mill
454
Impact pulverizers
465
Dome kilns with drying accessories
471
Reference list for fixed kilns
478
Feeding coal to the kiln
486
highalumina clays used for kiln brick
491
Actual fuel consumption and output
492
Actual output and fuel consumption at various plants 4 95
495
Heat used in evaporation of water
498
dissociation of carbonates per bbl cement
500
Theoretical heat requirements in B T U per bbl
501
Heat losses in practice
502
Sources of heat supply
503
Newberrys estimates on heat distribution in kilns
505
Summary of Richards tests of rotary kilns
507
Tests and estimates of heat distribution B T U per bbl
509
List of references on heat requirements etc
510
Analyses of kiln coals
513
Oil
522
natural gas Kansas
523
Clinker grinding
530
Effect of form of sulphate used
537
adding various percentages of calcined plasters
540
calcined sulphate on set of cement
541
calcium sulphate on strength of cement
543
544 203 treatment with anhydrous calcium sulphate
544
Analysis of gypsum used in cementplants
545
Effect of various salts on set of cement
546
Storage and packing
548
Capacity of Portlandcement barrels and weight of contents 552553
552
CHAPTER XXXVII
554
Labor costs in cementplant
558
and output in typical plants
559
Detailed estimates of costs of cement manufacture
560
Statistics of the American Portland cement industry
561
Total production of Portland cement in U S
562
Production of P C in the U S in 1901 1902 and 1903 by States
563
Portlandcement production of Lehigh district 18901903
564
Analyses of Portland cement 18491873
575
American Portland cement
577
CHAPTER XXXIX
583
Fineness of various American Portlands
585
Compressive strength of Portlandcement cubes
589
mortar and concrete cubes
590
Relation of tensile to compressive strength
591
Modulus of elasticity of Portland cement
592
Comparative tests of Portland cement and sandcement
594
Tensile and compressive strength of 591
596
sandcement mortars
597
Effect of heating on compressive strength
598
Standard methods of testing Am Soc C E
603
CHAPTER XL
614
IT S Reclamation Service 1904
620
American Society for Testing Materials 1904
629
Definition of puzzolanic materials
632
Analyses of pozzuolana from Italy f33
633
France
634
the Azores
635
trass and related materials from Germany
636
arCnes France
637
Average analyses of natural pozzuolanic materials
638
Artificial puzzolanic materials
639
Analyses of slags used for slagcement
643
Strength of granulated and ungranulated slag
648
Drying the slag
649
Working results of RugglesColes drier
651
Analyses of limes used in American slagcement plants
654
Regulation of set
658
Production of slag cement 604
664
Analyses of American slagcements
667
European
668
List of references on properties and testing of slag cements
671
Crushing strength of indurated slagbricks
683
Slag blocks
685
Analyses of slag used for slagblocks
689
Index to subjects
691

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