The Custer Reader

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Paul Andrew Hutton
U of Nebraska Press, Aug 1, 1993 - History - 585 pages
America's most famously unfortunate soldier has been the subject of scores of books, but The Custer Reader is unique as a substantial source of classic writings about and by him. Here is George Armstrong Custer as seen by himself, his contemporaries, and leading scholars. Those steeped in Custeriana will discover new insights in these pieces, some published for the first time, some difficult of access, assembled for easy reference. Those led by Custer's legend to make a fuller acquaintance will find here a reliable and complete introduction to his controversial personality and career and their transmogrification into myth. Combining first-person narratives, scholarly articles, photographic essays--as well as original selections by Robert M. Utley, Brian Dippie, Gregory J. W. Urwin, and Eric von Schmidt--The Custer Reader contains four sections, each introduced by Paul Andrew Hutton. Jay Monaghan, Brian Dippie, Charles King, and Chief Joseph White Bull are among those who illuminate Custer's Civil War years; his role in the Indian wars, particularly the Battle of the Little Big Horn; and the evolution of the Custer myth.
 

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The Custer reader

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With literally hundreds of titles about "America's most famously unfortunate soldier,'' Hutton (history, Univ. of New Mexico) manages to find and fill a niche in the Custer literature. The author of ... Read full review

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A great anthology of seminal works, including eyewitness accounts of both cavalrymen and Indians, focusing on all the key Custer elements: West Point and the Civil War years, his time in the West and life's end at the Little Bighorn, his relationship with Libbie, and subsequent "posthumous immortality." Scholarly discussion of everything from battlefield terrain and strategies to Anheuser Busch's renowned "Custer's Last Fight" barroom print and the films "They Died With Their Boots On" and "Little Big Man," all reinforcing elements in the time-honored tradition of Custer as metaphor.
Wish I read this years ago. When combined with one of the better Custer biographies such as those of Robert Utley, Jeffry Wert or even Evan S. Connell's "Son of the Morning Star" one has everything needed to begin immersion in Custeriana. With that intent, "The Custer Reader" is an important work to own.
 

Contents

MAPS
10
From West Point to the Battlefield
33
Custers Last StandTrevilian Station 1864
53
The Battle of Waynesboro
69
Photographic Essay
83
The Northern Plains 187090
96
The Indian Fighter
103
The West Breaks in General Custer
116
The Cavalry Campaign Outfit at the Little Big Horn
319
The Battle of the Little Bighorn
336
Custers Last Battle
345
She Watched Custers Last Battle
363
Photographic Essay
379
THE CUSTER MYTH
385
Custers Last Stand
424
Sunday at the Little Big Horn with George
463

Some Reminiscences Including the Washita Battle
159
Battling with the Sioux on the Yellowstone
201
Photographic Essay
221
Introduction
229
The Great Sioux War
232
The Little Big Horn
239
Custers Last Battle
257
General Custer in Hollywood
488
Jack Crabb and the Sole Survivors of Custers Last Stand 473
520
The Legend of the Martyred Hero in America
525
Photographic Essay
549
Sources
575
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About the author (1993)

Paul Andrew Hutton, the editor, is an associate professor of history at the University of New Mexico. His books include the prize-winning Phil Sheridan and His Army (Nebraska, 1985).

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