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of game.

two days' fast, these wolves are as men leap into the hut. Little Moon greedy as Maquas; they would eat could not speak, but she could see. up everything, and let a Milicetejek They were her enemies the Mohawks, starve !' And he took his bow and and one was the crafty Saccapee ! flint-headed arrows, and tramped He knew her at once, she was certain away again among the hills in search of it, by the gleam of triumph in

his eyes; but she was saved ! A day passed—another; still he The men spoke to the sufferers : returned not. The weather was neither could answer. They dreu stormy and intensely cold.

The back the covering from the face of winter-camp was buried in snow. Sau-pa-lose ;-she was dead! The A week elapsed — no Ma-dux-kees ! next day they scooped a grave from They were starving—the two women. the floor of the camp with their They said one to the other, ' Surely knives and hands, and buried the he has frozen to death. He threw poor squaw. off his skin-coat on the trail of the By great care in administering deer, and night overtook him and thick broth made of wolf's flesh and the storm, and he perished. This thickened with ground maize — the was a frequent calamity, and sug survivor recovered slowly ; yet not gested itself at once in explanation as slowly as she seemed, for she conof the hunter's absence.

cealed her strength, being resolved It was the tenth night since they at the first opportunity, to take to had tasted food, for their mocassins flight, as she preferred to die upon were unworthy the name ; even they the snow rather than be the trader's were demolished now.

slave; and she could see that he was “ Hist!' said Little Moon, raising harbouring an evil design against her, her head with difficulty from the though he held his tongue before the blankets on which she lay, and lis others. tening intently. There is a sound One day the trader and an Indian of voices, mother-somebody comes.' went out to hunt, leaving the third

Wolves,' replied Sau-pa-lose, in in the lodge; after a little the first a husky whisper; I hear them returned and took the place of the tramping on the snow.'

Mohawk, who joined his companion. She was right, for in another in Now,'hissed the villain in his nasal stant a chorus of yells burst forth patris, and glaring upon his victim, in the woods around the cabin, and *the dodging minsk is caught like a the snow-crust on its roof creaked mouse in a trap. What has she to with the tread of wild animals. say that Saccapee give her not up to

Little Moon gave a shriek. A be tortured at the stake? Her life dozen gaping monsters were peering is forfeited by the Maqua law, for down at her from the opening in the there was blood upon the trail of the top, ready to leap within. With a prisoner when she escaped, and the despairing etfort she threw some fir mane of the slaughtered warrior has boughs from her couch on the not yet been appeased. Saccapee smouldering fire. They crackled need only say one little word, and it and ignited in a strong blaze. The is done. What has she got to say ? wolves rushed back from the chim * She is a woman, a miserable ney, and stood in a circle gazing at woman,' murmured Little Moon the cloud of lurid smoke that ascended faintly ; she cannot find strength to from the cavern. The feeble girl talk. A brave man would not cast kept up the fire as long as the fuel such hard words at a starved woman. lasted, but by daylight it was ex The Awanooch has no heart.' hausted. The savage pack outside be * Peste !' returned the trader imgan to howl again, and sniff at the edge patiently; “how long is this going of the hole. Little Moon prayed. to last ? Saccapee has no heart for a Ha! what was that? A shot

lazy squaw.

If she does not get another -- three-rang in the keen well soon, he will find a medicine to air. The wolves fled in a body. make her, that is all.' No, not all, for a drop of warm And uttering this threat, which he blood fell between the split cedar of accompanied with a look significant the roof on the girl's hand. The and savage, the white man seized his light is suddenly obscured, and three gun and left the camp.

Little Moon sprang from her couch, night before the hole in the tree. and peered out after the trader with Towards morning it appeared to a flash of anger in her eyes, and doze, and Little Moon once thought when his retreating figure was hidden it was fast asleep; but no sooner had among the trees, she smiled strangely, she made up her mind to profit by it took down her snow-shoes from the and escape, than the shaggy creature peg where they hung, drew a pair of reared itself upon its hind-legs again mocassins belonging to the Mohawks and opened an eye, and Little Moon over her socks, tied some provision slunk back in despair. in a blanket, and then, with a last At length, after daybreak the bear look at the place where her mother shook itself, and began to look about lay, she sped away like a hunted and pace to and fro on the river, fawn over the crusted snow.

when, all at once, a shot was fired She went on until the close of from the adjoining thicket, and the day, looking behind often to see if animal rolled over and remained she were pursued; for there was a still. What was the girl's alarm ringing in her ears, like the yells of then, when out of the woods, not Mohawks or wolves, which kept her fifty yards from her retreat, she in continual terror. At length, beheld Saccapee running, with his breathless, light-headed, and ready gun in his hand, towards the bear! to faint with weakness, the girl crept, But the scene that followed quickly instinctively, within the hollow of a engrossed her thoughts, for the tree that was lying in the snow by animal was only stunned, and ere the river side, and slept soundly for the trader reached the place where some hours, for the weather was it lay, with a sharp cry it sprang mild.

upon its feet and flew at him. She was awakened by a noise. The Frenchman clubbed his gun Gracious powers ! what new danger and strove to disable his adversary; beset her? From the entrance of but the latter, with the science and the hollow two fiery eyes were agility of a pugilist, beat off the glaring, and there came a growl. blows, right and left, with its paws, She could even feel the breath of the and drove him back. Now Saccapee creature, whatever it was, hot

upon was on snow-shoes, and in his retreat her cheek; she shrunk back to the a tuft of grass on the river's bank further end of the cavity with a cry. tripped him up, and before he could The intruder also drew back, but recover his balance the bear closed much faster, for he shot from the upon him, and clasped its arms mouth of the tree like a cannon-ball. around its enemy in a deadly hug. Little Moon's teeth chattered. There, They rolled over, they twisted drawn up in the moonlight four round, they threw up the snow,paces oif, with glistening jaws, was a they were sometimes half hidden beħuge bear! It had been on a short neath it, the man and beast. Now excursion to stretch its legs after its the trader was uppermost in the long sleep, and in the interim, with fierce struggle, and now the bear. out knowing it, she had taken pos At last the grip of the latter relaxed, session of its den.

it fell over on its back, stabbed dead The perplexity seemed mutual. by the knife of Saccapee. Little Bruin sat upon the snow, shivering Moon thought her persecutor was in the night air, and afraid to ad also dead, for he remained, likewise, vance or to turn his back for a motionless, on the snow. But only moment on the mysterious guest; in a swoon, however; for after a while Little Moon, though she often time he revived, got up, staggering laughed afterwards at the droll re like a drunken man, and returned collection, felt little inclination then, the way he came, catching at the and would have been glad enough to twigs and trees as he went, and barely slip away and give up her berth to able to keep himself from falling. the beast. Yet, as she believed she Now was Little Moon rejoiced. ran the risk of being torn to pieces The incident had saved her, for she in the act, she deemed it better to was sure that Saccapee was following remain where she was.

on her tracks when he encountered The bear never budged an inch the bear, and this alone had prefrom the place, and kept watch all vented her from being retaken.

Uttering a brief prayer of grati- brave, fastidious, and simple-minded. tude to Kesoulk (the Great Spirit), He was one of those natural gentleshe crept from the tree, twisted her men who scorn to do a mean action, feet in her snow-shoe straps, and and are courteous and honourable skimmed as lightly as an ortolan by instinct; therefore was he well down the frozen river; while as she worthy of his charge. went she thought with pity of the The snow had long disappeared. poor bear, for it had not harmed her, The azure sky was visible only and, indirectly, she was the cause of throug a tracery of leaves. The its fate.

moss was speckled once more with Towards noon the rays of the sun, delicate flowers and the balls of the which were now obtaining power, scarlet pigeon - berry; the whipsoftened the surface of the snow and poor-will proclaimed the close of day. made the travelling very fatiguing, Then Little Moon and her friend sat but as the day advanced it crisped together in the shade, and their faces again, and enabled the fugitive to were sad. proceed with greater ease ; but her * Will my sister tell A-moos-took feet were dreadfully, sore, and her what she means ?' asked the Indian, limbs moved mechanically. She be in a soft, melancholy voice. His gan to droop, the suffering girl ; she heart is troubled at her words.' Ionged for some sheltered place, if it • She will,' was the reply: 'The were only to crawl into and die. time has arrived in which Little She was worn out and shivering with Moon must speak to her friend. cold.

• It is like an old legend told by Hark! Was not that a snapping an ancient to the children what the of branches in the woods ? Yes, for good Ma-dux-kees has often told me. the sounds increase; something comes He was on the path from the Wacrashing towards her. What can it loostook* to the sunrise, he said, mean?

when he found a little child asleep Whew! With a tremendous leap among the fern. Now it was a Palea cariboo, the swiftest animal of the face child alone in the depths of the forest, broke from the copse-wood woods, where none of that people close by, and flew along the plain of had ever been, and he was perplexed. the river like the wind, bound after It is the papoose of the Penobscot bound, while fast on its hoof-prints girl, who was coaxed away by the came an Indian, with head uncovered beautiful spirit of the Yeddon; it is and breast bared, in the ardour of so bright and fair.' This he said to the chase. It was A-moos-took (the himself, but straightway the child Clear Day).

Little Moon recog: awoke and cried, speaking in a strange nized him, uttered a cry, and fell tongue: it was terribly afraid of senseless at his feet. He thought Ma-dux-kees. But at last he quieted no more of the cariboo.

it with food, and took it with him, When recollection returned the and brought it to poor Sau-pa-lose, girl found herself lying, wrapped in and she was glad. skins, before a warm fire in the camp . Look you, my friend, it was a of the Clear Day, whither he had little girl, and it throve well. Now carried her more than a mile in his they loved it very much, and as they arms.

could not find out an owner for it • Rest in peace, my sister,' said he, they kept it for their own, and called as he knelt at her side, with a wooden it · Little Moon,' because it was a bowl of warm venison-soup in his soft gladness to their hearts. This hands; here is food if she would is what they said.' eat. Little Moon has nothing to • Then my sister is not the daughtrouble her here; A-moos-took is ter of the forest-people ?' said the Inher friend.'

dian, with a look of deep anxiety The maiden was sure of that, and which he strove not to conceal ; the she smiled gently at her deliverer, blood that runs in her veins is the took the proffered nourishment, and blood of the Pale-faces-is it so ?' slept.

• The Master of Life only can tell He was a noble fellow, that Indian, for a certainty,' she replied. 'Little

* The Upper St. John.

Moon has many broken memories of The happiness of the young couple things that were, but they are tan was not interrupted by the designs gled threads — she cannot unravel of the perfidious Saccapee, for he them. When she hears the Anglash never recovered fully from the hug eon (Englishman) speak she under of the wounded bear, and they were stands what the words mean, yet told subsequently that he was hung where she learnt them she knows no at Quebec for the murder of a bromore than you, my friend. But the ther-trader, whom he had waylaid, sounds cause many faces that are not shot, and robbed of his stock of red to appear in the air before her. peltries. It is very strange. She knows them, Three summers after their union every one !

And the voice of her A-moos-took and his wife chanced mother goes quivering to her heart, to pass through the country by the but it is not the voice of Sau-pa head waters of the Miramichi, when, lose. It calls her by a different some miles from the grave of Sauname. Little Moon is like one who pa-lose, they picked up a seal-skin has gone astray : she has often wept capot, which Little Moon, after a over her broken memories.'

close inspection, affirmed to be the The Indian mused. “Why has same her Milicete father had worn the daughter of the stranger told when he set out upon that hunting this to A-moos-took, the Micmac?' he excursion from which he never redemanded, in a low, mournful tone. turned. A little farther on, also, 'Is she too proud to sit by his side ?" they came to his blanket, rolled up

No, no, my brother-friend,' re and fastened still at the ends with plied the maiden, with earnestness, the bass-wood tump line. Continuing turning her blue eyes full upon the on they searched narrowly as they face of her companion, and giving went, and their sad forebodings soon him her hand; : Little Moon is a proved true; for in a lonely place, child of the red people in her heart. by the edge of a little stream, they She has lived with them and she found a skeleton, bleached and bent will die with them, for they are in a sitting posture on a dead tree. good. She spoke freely, that she The snow-shoes were still upon the might have no hidden things at this feet and a bow in the hand. time, so that A-moos-took should A-moos-took examined the former, know to whom he had given his and on the cross piece of each were love, that is all.'

rudely engraved a beaver and a star. The Indian's face brightened like These are the marks of Ma-duxthe forest leaves when the sun kees,' said Little Moon; and she emerges from the mists of Acadia. turned her face away and wept. He leaned towards the gentle found It was as they supposed. The ling of the Milicete; he kissed her poor hunter had thrown off his outer hand. It was the mute expression clothes during the heat of the chase, of his tenderness, the seal of his and being benighted on the trail of plighted faith,-mute, but eloquent a moose had frozen to death before to her. How long they remained he could recover them. in that blissful reverie they could • He looks like an ancient warnot afterwards tell, nor does it mat rior,' said A-moos-took, in a low and ter. The hunter wooed and won solemn voice ; •they sit sleeping like his beautiful bride in the greenwood him, with their shoes on their feet shade, and — we repeat it — he was and their bows in their hands. Maworthy of her.

dux-kees was a Milicete of the old In another moon they were united kind, and kept to his father's ways. by the marriage ritual of the French He is in the hunting-grounds of the Church, in accordance with the mode just.' then prevalent among the tribes of Little Moon was now doubly orAcadia, who had been converted to phaned, her Indian parents being Christianity by the Jesuit fathers both dead. Yet she did not repine. long before the arrival of the Eng Another guardian had been given lish, and wore its symbol in the form unto her, and him she followed along of a silver crucifix, which may still the path of life cheerfully, and with be seen on many an Indian breast in a confiding trust that failed not to that northern land.

its close.

THE POST OFFICE.

READER, if you be not entirely lar to it. The huge piles of letters, I used up,' and can still relish a and the huger mountains of newsminor excitement, take stroll papers, lie in heaps — the newlythrough the General Post-office some swallowed food. To separate their Saturday evening just as the clock different atoms, arrange and ciris, upon the stroke of six.

culate them, requires a multiplicity The scene is much more exciting of organs, and a variety of agents, than half the émeutes which have almost as numerous as those engaged lately taken place on the Continent; in the animal stomach—no one inconsiderably cheaper, and much terfering with the others, no one but is more safe. Stand aside amid the absolutely necessary to the well-being treble bank of spectators on the of the whole. right-hand, and watch the general So perfect is the drill, so clearly attack upon the letter-takers. А defined the duty of each member of stream of four or five hundred the army of seven or eight bundred people, who run as Doyle's pencil in men the stranger looks down upon Punch only can make them run, from one of the galleries, that he dash desperately towards the open can only compare its noiseless and windows of the receivers. Against unerring movements to the action of this torrent a couple of hundred who some chemical agency. have posted, dodge and finally dis Towards the vast table upon which appear. Wave after wave of people the correspondence of two millions of advances and retreats, gorging with people for two days is heaped and billets the capacious swallow of the tossed, a certain number performing post. Meanwhile a still more active the functions of the animal chyle and vigorous attack is going on proceed to arrange, eliminate, and in the direction where newspapers prepare it for future and more ela. are received. A sashless window borate operations; certain others frame, with tremendous gape, is as take away these eliminated atoms, saulted with showers of papers, such as the letters for the district dewhich fly faster than the driven livery, and, by means of a subterra

Now and then large sacks nean railway, transport them to their full, direct from the different news proper office on the opposite side of venders and publishing offices, are the building; others again, like busy bundled in and bolted whole. As ants, carry the letters for the general the moments pass the flight of papers delivery to the tables of the sorters, grows thicker, those who cannot when in a moment the important struggle to the fore' whiz their operation of classing into roads and missiles of intelligence over the heads towns, sets all hands to work as of the others, now and then sweep busily, as silently, and as purposefully ing hats with the force of round as the restless things we peep at shot. Letters struggle with more through the hive-glass, building up desperate energy, which is increased their winter sweets. to frantic desperation as the clock In an hour the process is comslowly strikes, one -- two-three plete ; and the thoughts of lawyers, four-five--sir ; when, with a nigh lovers, merchants, baukers, swinmiss of guillotining a score of hands, dlers, masters and servants, the with one loud snap all the windows private wishes of the whole town, lie simultaneously descend. The post side by side, enjoying inviolable like a huge monster has received its secrecy; and bagged, stringed, and full supply for the night, and gorged, sealed, are ready, after their brief begins, imperceptibly to the spec meeting, for their final dispersion tators, in quiet to digest.

over the length and breadth of the If we enter behind the scenes and land. traverse what might be considered All the broad features of this wellthe vast stomach of the office, we contrived organization, its economy shall perceive an organization almost and power, the spectator sees before as perfect as that which exists in the him; but much as he is struck animal economy, and not very dissimi- thereby, it is only when he begins to

snow.

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