Territorial Policy: Speech of Hon. James S. Green, of Missouri, in the Senate of the United States, January 10 and 11, 1860

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Printed at the Office of the Congressional Globe, 1860 - 24 Seiten
 

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Seite 8 - Resolved. That petitions for the abolition of slavery in the District of Columbia and the Territories of the United States...
Seite 5 - The powers over person and property of which we speak are not only not granted to Congress, but are in express terms denied, and they are forbidden to exercise them. And this prohibition is not confined to the States, but the words are general, and extend to the whole territory over which the Constitution gives it power to legislate, including those portions of it remaining under Territorial Government, as well as that covered by States.
Seite 8 - Congress ; and that every petition, memorial, resolution, proposition, or paper, touching or relating in any way, or to any extent whatever, to slavery, as aforesaid, or the abolition thereof, shall, on the presentation thereof, without any further action thereon, be laid upon the table, without being debated, printed, or referred.
Seite 15 - That the legislative power of the territory shall extend to all rightful subjects of legislation consistent with the constitution of the United States and the provisions of this act...
Seite 5 - It is a total absence of power everywhere within the dominion of the United States, and places the citizens of a Territory, so far as these rights are concerned, on the same footing with citizens of the States, and guards them as firmly and plainly against any inroads which the General Government might attempt under the plea of implied or incidental powers.
Seite 5 - The territory being a part of the United States, the government and the citizen both enter it under the authority of the Constitution, with their respective rights defined and marked out ; and the federal government can exercise no power over his person or property, beyond what that instrument confers, nor lawfully deny any right which it has reserved.
Seite 8 - Constitution; that all efforts of the Abolitionists or others, made to induce Congress to interfere with questions of slavery, or to take incipient steps in relation thereto, are calculated to lead to the most alarming and dangerous consequences...
Seite 8 - That we recognize the right of the people of all the Territories, including Kansas and Nebraska, acting through the legally and fairly expressed will of a majority of the actual residents, and whenever the number of their inhabitants justifies it, to form a Constitution with or without domestic slavery, and be admitted into the Union upon terms of perfect equality, with the other States.
Seite 23 - Mississippi territory, as may then be the representatives from the several counties within the limits of the territory to be established by this act; and the said members shall constitute the legislative council, and house of representatives for the aforesaid Alabama territory, whose powers, in...
Seite 4 - But, as we have before said, it was acquired by the General Government, as the representative and trustee of the people of. the United States, and it must therefore be held in that character for their common and equal benefit; for it was the people of the several States, acting through their agent and representative, the Federal Government, who in fact acquired the Territory in question, and the Government holds it for their common use until it shall be associated with the other States as a member...

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