Freedom, Civil and Religious: The American Conception of Liberty for Press, Pulpit, and Public, as Guaranteed in the Federal Constitution

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Review and Herald, 1920 - 128 Seiten
 

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Seite 67 - Who is the image of the invisible God, the first-born of every creature ; for by him were all things created, that are in heaven, and that are in earth, visible and invisible, whether they be thrones, or dominions, or principalities, or powers ; all things were created by him, and for him; and he is before all things, and by him all things consist...
Seite 60 - That religion, or the duty which we owe to our Creator, and the manner of discharging it, can be directed only by reason and conviction, not by force or violence, and therefore all men are equally entitled to the free exercise of religion, according to the dictates of conscience, and that it is the mutual duty of all to practice Christian forbearance, love, and charity towards each other.
Seite 44 - ... all attempts to influence it by temporal punishments, or burthens, or by civil incapacitations, tend only to beget habits of hypocrisy and meanness, and are a departure from the plan of the holy author of our religion...
Seite 23 - THAT NO MAN SHALL BE COMPELLED to frequent or support any religious worship, place or ministry whatsoever...
Seite 33 - That all men have a natural and indefeasible right to worship Almighty God according to the dictates of their own consciences...
Seite 28 - He's true to God who's true to man ; wherever wrong is done, To the humblest and the weakest, 'neath the all-beholding sun, That wrong is also done to us ; and they are slaves most base, Whose love of right is for themselves, and not for all their race.
Seite 6 - Our reliance is in the love of liberty which God has planted in us. Our defense is in the spirit which prizes liberty as the heritage of all men, in all lands everywhere.
Seite 23 - Assembly, that no man shall be compelled to frequent or support any religious worship, place or ministry whatsoever, nor shall be enforced, restrained, molested, or burthened in his body or goods, nor shall otherwise suffer on account of his religious opinions or belief; but that all men shall be free to profess, and by argument to maintain, their opinion in matters of religion, and that the same shall in no wise diminish, enlarge or affect their civil capacities.
Seite 10 - They are slaves who fear to speak For the fallen and the weak ; They are slaves who will not choose Hatred, scoffing, and abuse, Rather than in silence shrink From the truth they needs must think ; They are slaves who dare not be In the right with two or three.
Seite 64 - WHAT CONSTITUTES A STATE?" An Ode in Imitation of Alcaus WHAT constitutes a State,? Not high-raised battlement or labored mound, Thick wall or moated gate; Not cities proud with spires and turrets crowned; Not bays and...

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