Abbildungen der Seite
PDF

OF THE

AMERICAN ORIENTAL SOCIETY.

SEVENTH VOLUME.

NEW HAVEN:
FOR THE AMERICAN ORIENTAL SOCIETY,
PRINTED BY E, HAYES, PRINTER TO YALE COLLEGE.

MDCOCLXII.

SOLD BY THE SOCIETY'S AGENTS :
NEW YORK: B. WESTERMANN & CO., 440 BROADWAY;
LONDON: TRÜBNER & CO.; PARIS: BENJ. DUPRAT;

LEIPZIG: F. A. BROCKHAUS.

[blocks in formation]

i

APPENDIX.

AMERICAN ORIENTAL SOCIETY :

Proceedings at New Haven, Oct. 17th and 18th, 1860. · ·
Proceedings at Boston and Cambridge, May 22nd, 1861. .
Additions to the Library and Cabinet, May 1860—May 1861.
Proceedings at New York, Oct. 16th and 17th, 1861. . .
Proceedings at Boston and Cambridge, May 21st, 1862. .
Proceedings at Princeton, Oct. 15th and 10th, 1862. . .
Additions to the Library and Cabinet, May 1861–Oct. 1862.
List of Members, Oct. 1862. . . . . . . .

[merged small][merged small][ocr errors]

ARTICLE 1.

ON THE KINGS OF MANDALA, AS COMMEMORATED IN A SANSKRIT INSCRIPTION

NOW FIRST PRINTED IN THE ORIGINAL TONGUE.

BY FITZ-EDWARD HALL, D.C.L.

Presented to the Society October 17, 1860.

In the fifteenth volume of the Asiatic Researches, pp. 437– 443, an English rendering will be found, executed by Captain Fell, and published posthumously, of the record here presented in its own terms and translated anew. But Captain Fell, it should appear, bad not seen the first, thirty-ninth, and forty-fourth stanzas, and that which follows the forty-eighth, agreeably to the numbering of the inscriptionist. As for the rest, his labors in connection with the monument under notice were manifestly cut short by his death. This inference is, indeed, fully authorized by the fact that his version of the original was left unaccompanied by any commentation; whereas a land-grant, forming part of the same paper with that version, is annotated in copious detail. Except for the circumstance of his untimely decease, many of the laxities with which his interpretation of the ensuing text is justly chargeable, as it stands, would also, perhaps, have undergone redress.

Sir Henry Sleeman, in the August number of the Journal of the Asiatic Society of Bengal for 1837, has discoursed at length on the historical, or postmythical, princes of Mandala, on the basis of native documents. These documents, as might be antici. pated, exhibit a liberal element of the incredible. They consist of two manuscript works in the Hindi language, of anonymous authorship. Copies of both are in my possession. One of them is considerably more specific than the other; and they are not seldom irreconcilable. As, however, we have to do so largely, in these accounts, with palpable fables, it matters little that they contradict each other. Solely with a view to bring forward a specimen of the manner in which the Hindus associate fact and

VOL. VII.

« ZurückWeiter »