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goodness, which universal Nature, in all its parts, exhibits before us ! The affiduous culture of such exalted faculties, and worthy dispositions as these, is the most delightful exercise ; an employment of them, which Nature generously dictates, which the heart suggests, as the incumbent duty of dependent beings, and which all our powers approve as the fole worthy return of beneficiaries for benefactions so immense.

• The Being, who implanted in the human heart this illustrious train of intelle&tual abilities, perceptions, and dispofitions, gave, at the same time, a tendency to these affections.—But to what do these moral endowments and difpofitions naturally tend ?- They naturally tend to God. They all ultimately concenter in him, from whom they were derived. They acknowledge their parent, in all their generous efforts they indicate, they fix the contemplating mind upon him, aspire after him, acquiesce in him, as the sole object that can, from the infinite plenitude of his benignity, fatisfy their enlarged and boundless desires. The heart and all its powers approve his service, as perfect liberty, and perfect happiness, feel a kindred, a congenial satisfaction in the delightful exercise of devout and grateful affections towards him, feel a sacred and holy transport in the religious and virtuous coltivation of such principles and dispositions as are pleasing to him, and taste the most exquifite pleasure, that can be tafted in this world, in maintaining a commupion and intercourse with the great Father of their immortal spirits. What is Religion, but an aslimilation to the blessed God, in his purity, holiness, rectitude, and moral perfection. A ftudy, a virtuous ambition, to be as like the God we ferve as posible in the temper and disposition of our minds, constitutes the very essence of religion. And what a pleasing and delectable exercise is this ! To be employed in the imitation of God, exercising, like him, the dispositions and affections he ba'h given us in the diffusion of happiness, and making those principles, which are the foundation of his immutable and consummate happiness, the basis on which we are determined to erect all our happiness! How naturally does the human heart prompt such truths and practical principles as these! And what exalted felicity results from carrying these into execution! They really reward themselves in their performance. By our cherishing such dispositions the intention of nature, and of the Author of nature, is answered, and the applause of our faithful consciences tells us it is answered. -Our unterstanding gives its fuffrage to Religion, as the great law of our Creator, and the supreme happiness of our natures. It represents such a service as infinitely natural and infinitely reasonable, as the joft di&tate of dependence, the equitable tribute of gratitude, and an indispensable obligation upon frail and indigent creatures for the various bleflings of their all-fufficient benefactor. Our will, judgment, moral lajte, and discernment, unite in giving their fanction to religion, as what solely constitutes the moral union and harmony of all the mental powers; they recommend it, choose it, and conjoin in approving it, as the source of the most substantial and permanent happi. neis, and as perfective of the true dignity and glory of our rational and immortal natures. Our confrience feals and tamps with its solemn sanction the intrinsic worth and native excellence of religion, itrongly, painfully remonstrating against every wilful violation of its laws, and applauding every virtuous compliance with its great injunctions. So that

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fense of pleasure, the constant exercise of forrow, felf-denial, and the whole monkish train of auftere virtues.

Mr. Harwood represents religion in her native form and comeliness, as the most amiable of all objects, as the offspring of Truth and Love, and the parent of BENEVOLENCE, Hope, and Joy. We shall give our Readers a specimen of his style and manner.

• Intending, says he, to represent Religion as most lovely and ami. able in its nature, as introducing us into a path the most pleasant and delectable into which our feet can be directed, and as productive of peace, tranquillity, joy, and the noblest mental satisfaction, suffer me to observe, Thai Religion is congenial to the human mind, and to all our intellectual and moral powers.

The least reflection will convince us, that we did not form ourselves, any more than a magnificent palace was formed by chance, any more than the sun, moon, and stars were fixed in their respective orbits by fate, or the regular and beatiful system of the world combined by the fortuitous jumble of atoms. We cannot think of our formation, the amazing structure of our bodies, and the more amazing fabric of our minds, without the idea of the supreme Firft Cause and Universal Parent necesiarily obiruding iiself upon our reflections. Whenever we seriously contemplate our frame, we naturally look to God, from u hom our existence, and all the happiness of our existence is originally and ultimately derived. Abba, Father! is the natural dictate of ihe human heart-is the natural invocation and address, which an intelligent creature prefers to its wise and good Creator. Our dependence is lug. gelled by every thing in us and around us. It is the constant unremitting energy of the Deiry, that maintains our animal powers in their regular functions, and our intellectual faculties in their continual operations. In the Deity we live, move, and enjoy natural and moral existence. His influence conserves those powers in their uniform exercise which he originally imparted ; his benevolent agency perpetuates to us the fruition of our undertanding, reason, and affections ; and there is no enjoyment, natural or moral, with which we are blessed, of which he is not the primary and most merciful Donor. All the streams of all our felicity How from him as their original fountain. All our personal, domeftic, and social happiness, all our improvements in knowledge and in holiness, are jufily and thankfully to be ascribed to him, who furnished us with perceptions for tating the one, and with powers for attaining the orber. - In this view how reasonable a service doth Religion appear! How na. tural an expresion is it of our gratitude for such immense obligations be. stowed! How effential, how ingenuous a return is it to the greatest and best of Beings, who endowed us with such capacities, enabled us to relish such exal ed enjoyır.ents, adorned our natures with such an apparatus of elegant sensibilities, inspired us with such dignity and elevation of mind, and most munificently poured around us such a liberal profution and noft inimenfe variety of happiness ! How infinitely are we indebted to our most merciful Creator for furnithing us with such perceptions, for lavishing upon us fuch a multiplicity of intellectual blelings, and making us capable of enjoving fuch Tublime, refined, and exalted pleasures, fuit from the conte in plation of himself, from the exercise of our best affections, from a devout conscious fenie of our dependence on so good Being, and from a susvey of that allonishing wildom, contrivance, and

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goodness, which universal Nature, in all its parts, exhibits before us! The affiduous culture of such exalted faculties, and worthy dispositions as these, is the mot delightful exercise ; an employment of them, which Nature generously dictates, which the heart suggests, as the incumbent duty of dependent beings, and which all our powers approve as the sole . worthy return of beneficiaries for benefactions so immense.

The Being, who implanted in the human heart this illustrious train of intelle&tual abilities, perceptions, and difpofitions, gave, at the same time, a tendency to these affections.-But to what do these moral endowments and dispositions naturally tend ?- They naturally tend to God. They all ultimately concenter in him, from whom they were derived. They acknowledge their parent, in all their generous efforts they indicate, they fix the contemplating mind upon him, aspire after him, acquiesce in him, as the sole object that can, from the infinite plenitude of his benignity, fatisfy their enlarged and boundless desires. The heart and all its powers approve his service, as perfect liberty, and perfect happiness, feel a kindred, a congenial satisfaction in the delightful exercise of devout and grateful affections towards him, feel a sacred and holy transport in the religious and virtuous cultivation of such principles and dispositions as are pleasing to him, and taste the most exquisię pleasure, that can be talted in this world, in maintaining a communion and intercourse with the great Father of their immortal spirits. What is Religion, but an assimilation to the blessed God, in his purity, holiness, rectitude, and moral perfection. A ftudy, a virtuous ambition, to be as like the God we serve as poshble in the temper and disposition of our minds, constitutes the very essence of religion. And what a pleasing and delectable exercise is this ! To be employed in the imitation of God, exercising, like him, the dispositions and affections he ha h given us in the diffusion of happiness, and making those principles, which are the foundation of his immutable and consummate happiness, the basis on which we are determined to erect all our happiness ! How naturally does the human heart prompt such truths and practical principles as these! And what exalted felicity results from carrying these into execution! They really reward themselves in their performance. By our cherishing such dispositions the intention of nature, and of the Author of nature, is answered, and the applause of our faithful confciences tells us it is answered.--Our untersianding gives its suffrage to Religion, as the great law of our Creator, and the supreme happiness of our natures. It represents such a service as infinitely natural and infinitely reasonable, as the juft dictate of dependence, the equitable tribute of gratitude, and an indispensable obligation upon frail and indigent 'creatures for the various blessings of their all-fufficient benefactor. Our will, judgment, moral tafti, and discernment, unite in giving their fanction to religion, as what folely constitutes the moral union and harmony of all the mental powers; they recommend it, choose it, and conjoin in approving it, as the source of the most fubitantial and permanent happi. neis, and as perfective of the true dignity and glory of our rational and immortal natures. Our confiience feals and tamps with its solemn sanction the intrinsic worth and native excellence of religion, Itrongly, painfully remonstrating against every wilful violation of its laws, and plauding every virtuous compliance with its great injuncions. S

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you see all our intellectual and moral powers harmoniously concur in give ing their atteitation to the unrivalled amiableness and importance of religion, in reprefenting it as the noblest attainment, the most natural, and consequently the best exercise of our rational faculties, as the primary cardinal law imprelied upon us in our formation, as the first and ultimate design of our Creator, as the confummate felicity of our natures, as the beit moral copy of the great divine Original, as the fairelt imitation of the Deity, the great first Standard and fupreme Exemplar of all moral beauty and perfection.'.

As this useful performance is designed for young perfons, the Author bras, through the whole of it, inade use of a florid, diffufive, and decla. marry kyle, as being, in general, most agreeable to their talte.' Art. 42. The Hypothefis of a Triune Substence in the Deity, as

maintained by the Author of A Seasonable Rebuke to an Ignorant Reviler ; examined by a By-fiander. 8vo. 6d. Wilkie.

Having never to the best of our recollection) fecn the Seafonable Run buki, nor heard of it before, we have nothing farther to say, with regard to this examination of it, than that it is written in opposition to the Athanasian herely; and that this controversy appears to have been occasioned by a notable tract pretended to have been wrote by a blask. Smiib: probably the same mentioned in our 211 Vol. p. 57. Art. 43. An Attempt to restore the supreme IV or hip of God the Father

Almighty. To which is now added, a Dialogue between an Athanafian and a Unitarian. Written for the Use of

poor

Chrile tians, by George Williams, a Livery-servant. Second Edi, rion, with Additions, and a Preface, by T. A. O.T.C.O. A. D. 810. IS. Becket and De Hondt.

From the publication of this edition of Williams's Arompt, it appears that the little anonymous tract, entitled, A Dial gue between an Unitarian Chriftian and an Atkarafın, mentioned in our Review for September, page 237, and here re printed, is also the work of this honest and pious DOMESTIC The preface to this joint edition of the two pamphlets, appears to be written by a reverend gentleman of Brillol; who has taken this occafion of giving the following account of the Author: which may ferve as a supplement to the particulars inserted in our Review of the dis

• Great numbers, it seems, have thought that the nome prefixed to this pamphlet is a fictitious one, and that no such perfon as George Wila liams, the real author of this Attempt, can be produced. I have, there. fore, wrote this, principally to atteit the identity of his person. This honest worthy man lives at Tewkesbury in Giocestershire. He is a very ferious, fedate, intelligent person, who has ever maintained a character onexceptionable. I take him to be about 50. He is a livery-fervant, but has enjoyed many opportunities for the improvement of his mind. In his vacan: hours be hath carefully read some of the best books in our tanu

paffion for truth is boundless. In a letter now before de lad ruller proriete rrutb in the world than eri &

Churches

tempi, viz.

churches or bwill hospitals. He hath no despicable appi atus of mathematical instruments ; and possesses a considerable fund of philosophical koowledge, which he hath acquired solely by the dint of application, and the habit of patient thinking. I find he hath always been diftin guished for the probity, integrity, and goodness of his heart. This is a poffeffion worth all the science and erudition in the world. Our Lord faid, Tbe poor bave the gospel preached unto them, consequently the poor are as capable of understanding its fundamental truths as the profoundelt scholar that ever lived. There is not one revelation for the poor, another for the rich ; one system of truths for the learned, another for the unJearned. The gospel indiscriminately opens its divine treafures to alt. The peafare is as much concerned in its great doctrines and discoveries as the philofopher. This worthy conscientious Chriftian hach gone through evil report and good report ; through honour and diffonour. Some fay of him as they did of our divine Malter, that he is a good man: others say nay, but he deceiveth the people. I find he hath been greatly carelled by numbers both of the clergy and laity since the publication of this little tract ; while others have loaded him with odious names; have tried to incense the rabble against him, threatened bin with a prosecution, and endeavoured to confutė him by the invincible arguments of the secular arm. I only wish I had interest enough in the world to promote a sub(cription to this worthy honest creature, to enable him to buy a few more good books, and a few more useful philosophical instruments.'

The main intention of this preface, is to second and enforce what Mr. Williams has offered in support of the Unitarian doctrine ; by fome general observations on the absurdity of what is here styled “the Athanasian impiety of ebree Gods.'

Art. 44. Ante-nuptial Fornication considered. In a Letter to a

young Gentleman. - Small 8vo. IS. Becket. One would not have imagined that any thing could ever have been feriously offered in defence of any species of fornication; and confequently, we might naturally conclude, that a course of learned arguments against a criininal indulgence in ante-nuptial intimacies, would be totally unnecessary :- altho' diffuafoes, on religious and prudential motives, may have become but too requisite, from the indiscretion or frailty of many individuals. A case, however, is here ftated, wherein a young gentleman, foberly inclined, and in view of a happy matrimonial connexion, was engaged in a debate on the subject of antenu prial fornication; wherein he found himself unable to maintain the virtuous cause of chastity, against the specious reasonings of a fet of able disputants, who undertook to palliate and even vindicate a practice, into which tho ju venile cafuilt was by no means inclined to fall. Our Author, therefore, sends him this long and elaborate epistle, to enable him the better to fand his ground, against his fubtle and even learned opponents. To this purpolé, be enters on a critical enquiry into the nature of matrimory; and quotes a variety of passages from the Old and New Tettamenis, both preceptive and historical, relacing to this subjest. And having considered how far the idea of the marriage sivenant is conform able to the dictates both of reafga and scripture; he next thews in what

manner

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