Our Friend John Burroughs

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Houghton Mifflin, 1914 - 286 Seiten
 

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Seite 218 - The outward shows of sky and earth, Of hill and valley, he has viewed; And impulses of deeper birth Have come to him in solitude. In common things that round us lie Some random truths he can impart, — The harvest of a quiet eye That broods and sleeps on his own heart.
Seite 19 - Come near now, and kiss me, my son. And he came near, and kissed him: and he smelled the smell of his raiment, and blessed him, and said, See, the smell of my son is as the smell of a field which the LORD hath blessed...
Seite 70 - Family likeness has often a deep sadness in it Nature, that great tragic dramatist, knits us together by bone and muscle, and divides us by the subtler web of our brains; blends yearning and repulsion; and ties us by our heartstrings to the beings that jar us at every movement We hear a voice with the very cadence of our own uttering the thoughts we despise; we see eyes - ah!
Seite 182 - gainst time or fate. For, lo ! my own shall come to me. I stay my haste, I make delays, For what avails this eager pace? I stand amid the eternal ways, And what is mine shall know my face. Asleep, awake, by night or day, The friends I seek are seeking me ; No wind can drive my bark astray, Nor change the tide of destiny. What matter if I stand alone? I wait with joy the coming years; My heart shall reap where it has sown, And garner up its fruit of tears.
Seite 183 - My heart shall reap where it hath sown, And garner up its fruit of tears. The waters know their own, and draw The brook that springs in yonder heights ; So flows the good with equal law Unto the soul of pure delights.
Seite 186 - ... to be in direct and personal contact with the sources of your material life; to want no extras, no shields; to find the universal elements enough; to find the air and the water exhilarating; to be refreshed by a morning walk or an evening saunter; to...
Seite 270 - And yonder bluebird with the earth tinge on his breast and the sky tinge on his back,— did he come down out of heaven on that bright March morning when he told us so softly and plaintively that if we pleased, spring had come? Indeed, there is nothing in the return of the birds more curious and suggestive than in the first appearance, or rumors of the appearance, of this little bluecoat.
Seite 30 - But if you would know the delights of bee-hunting, and how many sweets such a trip yields beside honey, come with me some bright, warm, late September or early October day. It is the golden season of the year, and any errand or pursuit that takes us abroad upon the hills or by the painted woods and along the amber colored streams at such a time is enough.
Seite 21 - IT is, I find, in zoology as it is in botany: all nature is so full, that that district produces the greatest variety which is the most examined.
Seite 157 - The bird at first seems a mere wandering voice in the air: one hears its call or carol on some bright March morning, but is uncertain of its source or direction; it falls like a drop of rain when no cloud is visible; one looks and listens, but to no purpose.

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