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Made after the similitude of God.—JAMES iï. 9.

Thou madest him to have dominion over the works of thy hands; thou hast put all things under his feet.

Ps. viii. 6.

Thou hast made him a little lower than the angels, and hast crowned him with glory and honour.

Ps. viii. 5.

son ! ing, how

What a piece of work is man! How noble in rea

How infinite in faculties ! In form, and mov

express and admirable! In action, how like an angel! In apprehension, how like a god! The beauty of the world !--the paragon of animals.

HAMLET. Act II. Scene 2.

LXX.

THE MARRIAGE TIE A SACRED ONE

What therefore God hath joined together, let not man put asunder.—Matt. xix. 6.

God forbid that I should wish them sever'd,
Whom God hath joined together.

KING HENRY VI. (3d part). Act iv. Scene 1.

1 1 Cor, vii. 10, 11.

God, the best maker of all marriages,
Combine your

hearts in one.
KING HENRY V. Act. v. Scene 2.

LXXI.

MEN'S CURSES RECOIL ON THEIR OWN

HEADS.

As he loved cursing, so let it come unto him.

Ps. cix. 17.

Dread curses-like the sun 'gainst glass,
Or like an overcharged gun-recoil.

KING HENRY VI. (2d part). Act III. Scene 2.

Take heed, lest by your heat you burn yourselves.

KING HENRY VI. (2d part). Act v. Scene 1.

LXXII.

MERCY AN ATTRIBUTE OF GOD.

He delighteth in mercy. –Micah vii. 18.

The Lord is merciful and gracious, slow to anger, and plenteous in mercy.—Ps. ciii. 8.

1 Is. liv. 7, 8.

To the Lord our God belong mercies and forgiveness, though we have rebelled against him.

Dan. ix. 9.

2

The Lord is longsuffering and of great mercy.

NUMB. xiv. 18.

But mercy is above this scepter'd sway,
It is enthroned in the hearts of kings:
It is an attribute to God himself.

MERCHANT OF VENICE.

Act iv. Scene 1.

Wilt thou draw near the nature of the gods ?
Draw near them then in being merciful.

TITUS ANDRONICUS. Act 1. Scene 2.

LXXIII.

THE BENEFICIAL EFFECTS OF MIRTH.

A merry heart doeth good like a medicine : but a broken spirit drieth the bones.—PROV. xvii. 22.

He that is of a merry heart hath a continual feast. A merry heart maketh a cheerful countenance: but by sorrow of the heart the spirit is broken.

PROV. XV. 15.

1 Neh. ix. 16, 17; Ps. cxxx. 4, 7. ? Exod. xxxiv. 6, 7; Ps. cxlv. 8; John iv. 2.

PROV. xv. 13.

Give not over thy mind to heaviness, and afflict not thyself in thine own counsel, The gladness of the heart is the life of a man; and the joyfulness of a man prolongeth his days.-Ecclus. xxx. 21, 22.

A light heart lives long.
Love's LABOUR's Lost.

Act v. Scene 2.

Care's an enemy to life.

TWELFTH NIGHT. Act 1. Scene 3.

A merry heart goes all the day,
Your sad tires in a mile.

WINTER'S TALE. Act iv. Scene 2.

Sweet recreation barr'd what doth ensue,
But moody and dull Melancholy,
(Kinsman to grim and comfortless Despair),
And, at her heels, a huge infectious troop
Of pale distemperatures, and foes to life.

COMEDY OF ERRORS. Act v. Scene 1.

Why should a man, whose blood is warm within, Sit like his grandsire cut in alabaster?

1 Prov. xii. 25; Ecclus. xxx. 23, 24.

Sleep, when he wakes ? and creep into the jaundice
By being peevish ? *

MERCHANT OF VENICE. Act 1. Scene 1.

LXXIV.

MODERATION RECOMMENDED.

Hast thou found honey? eat so much as is sufficient for thee, lest thou be filled therewith, and vomit it.

PROV. xxv, 16.

Let your moderation be known to all men.

PHIL. iv. 5.

Take heed to yourselves, lest at any time your hearts be overcharged with surfeiting. 2-LUKE xxi. 34.

A surfeit of the sweetest things
The deepest loathing to the stomach brings.
MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM.

Act II. Scene 3.

* In wooing sorrow let's be brief, Since, wedding it, there is such length of grief.

KING RICHARD II. Act v. Scene 1.

Gnarling sorrow hath less power to bite
The man that mocks at it, and sets it light.

KING RICHARD II. Act 1. Scene 3.
11 Tim. iv. 4.

1 Cor. ix. 25.

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