500 Years of New Words

Cover
Dundurn, 2004 - 312 Seiten

500 Years of New Words takes you on an exciting journey through the English language from the days before Shakespeare to the first decade of the 21st century. All the main entries are arranged not alphabetically by in chronological order based on the earliest known year that each word was printed or written down.

Beginning with "America" in 1507 and spanning the centuries to "Marsiphobiphiliac" in 2004 (a person who would love to go to Mars but is afraid of being marooned there), this book can be opened at any page and the reader will discover a dazzling array of linguistic delights. In other words, this book is unputdownable (the main entry for 1947). If Shakespeare were alive today, he would buy this book.

 

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Inhalt

Foreword
9
The 1600s
73
The 1700s
135
The 1800s
199
The 1900s and Beyond
255
Urheberrecht

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Beliebte Passagen

Seite 14 - Strange, that the New World should have no better luck, — that broad America must wear the name of a thief. Amerigo Vespucci, the pickle-dealer at Seville, who went out, in 1499, a subaltern with Hojeda, and whose highest naval rank was boatswain's mate in an expedition that never sailed, managed in this lying world to supplant Columbus, and baptize half the earth with his own dishonest name.
Seite 14 - World should have no better luck, — that broad America must wear the name of a thief. Amerigo Vespucci, the pickle-dealer at Seville, who * William Spence. went out, in 1499, a subaltern with Hojeda, and whose highest naval rank was boatswain's mate in an expedition that never sailed, managed in this lying world to supplant Columbus, and baptize half the earth with his own dishonest name.

Über den Autor (2004)

Bill Sherk has enjoyed a life-long fascination with words. While teaching history to high school students in Toronto, he read Webster's Dictionary from cover to cover, a feat that took three years, three months, and sixteen days. He then wrote two dictionaries of his own: Brave New Words (1979) and More Brave New Words (1981). His latest book, 500 Years of New Words is an update of his earlier book (1983) which now brings the English language into the 21st century.

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