Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
EPUB
[ocr errors][ocr errors]

Scott's enjoyment of Nature, . • • • •
His love of color. • • • • - - • •
The power of the masters shown by their self annihilation, .
Two orders of Poets, . • • • • • • •
Keats's description of a wave, . . . • • • •
Dante and Homer, . - • - •
“La Toilette de Constance,” by de la Vigne, • e •
Comparison between Pope and Wordsworth, • • •
The Jessy of Shenstone, . • • • • • •
The Juno and Diana of the Greek • • • e •
The Greeks' view of Nature, • • • • • •
Taste in Literature and Art, o • • • • •
Books recomnended, . • • • © • d o

[ocr errors]

Natural imagery of the Bible, . • • • • s

Prejudices against the love of Nature, . • - e *

Love of Nature associated with wilfulness and faithlessness, .

The Sermon on the Mount, . • • o • © •

Railroads and telegraphs, . • • • * • •

Utopianism, - •

The use of scientific pursuits, . • • * •

Falsehood, . - • - - e e e o •

No falsity harmless, . - • • e • • e

The want of Faith in Christendom, . © • • d

Romanist and Puritan, • • o • • • ©

Disdain of Beauty in Man, . • o • • • •

Utilitarians, e • • • e • • e e

The Spirit of Prophecy, e • e o o e •

The duty of Delight, . • • • • e • •

A Voice of Warning, . . . . . • •

Noble aims, • • e

Influence of the Fall of Man, • •

All have gifts, various in degree and kind, . • • e.

Gratitude for the deeds of the living, . • e • •

Intemperance, . • • • • • • e •

Tradesmen ought to be gentlemen, . • • • e

Why is one man richer than another?. e • - e. e

“Special Providences,” . • * • e •

383

386

387

388

390

392

396

396

397

398

399

400

40 l.

401

402

403

403

404

405

406

406

407

408

412.

[graphic]
[graphic]
[ocr errors][merged small]

A PREFACE need not, as a matter of course, be an apology. Yet, an apology would be offered for “Selections” from Ruskin's Works, were those valuable works accessible to readers in general. Being voluminous and expensive, they are beyond the means of many who could appreciate and highly enjoy them. Moreover, some of the topics discussed are merely local (English), and not specially interesting to the American public. A rich field, however, remains, from which these selections have been carefully culled, and methodically arranged to form a book complete in itself. For the choice and arrangement alone, is the Editor responsible; the Author speaks for himself.

[merged small][ocr errors]

y

M OTICE

OF

JOHN RUSKIN AND HIS WORKS.

ALTHOUGH novelty is generally a source of pleasure, yet what is new sometimes meets with opposition, merely because it is neV. About twenty years ago a book appeared in London, entitled, “Modern Painters: By a Graduate of Oxford;” the main object of which was, to vindicate the reputation of the land. scape-painter Turner, whose pictures had been ruthlessly assailed by the Reviewers. The author confesses that the book originated “in indignation at the shallow and false criticism of the periodicals of the day on the works of the great living artist.” And who was the presumptuous “Graduate,” who thus threw down the gauntlet, and defied the mighty host of Reviewers? A young man unknown to fame! A mere fledgeling from the University! Yet in his book there was a bold originality, an uncom. promising independence, quite startling to the lovers of the

[graphic]
« ZurückWeiter »