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This you

in a blue rosette, and every attention will be immediately paid you.

GENERAL DIRECTIONS. Good breakfasts will be provided at Boulogne, at various hotels, at 2 francs each person. will pay for yourself.

Immediately upon entering the stations, take your seats and do not leave them, as the getting in and out must create confusion. Then upon being seated, prepare your tickets for inspection.

The most comfortable, as well as expeditious way of travelling, is always to shew an accommodating disposition, and a desire to oblige; and although you do not approve of all the customs you find, to comply with them. Many travellers make themselves and others uncomfortable, and retard their own progress by their stubbornness in not willingly complying with the customs and usages with which they are not familiar. From our neighbours whom we are now visiting it may safely be said, that we are sure to experience a large share of courtesy and an evident desire to oblige upon all occasions.

ARRIVAL IN PARIS.
Immediately you arrive, you go into a large room

where all the luggage is taken. Here the commissionaires of the hotels where you put up, will be in waiting as well as the gentlemen of the Paris Committee, who will do their utmost for your comfort in conducting you to the hotel. The fare by Cab will be two francs from the station to any of the hotels, for two, three or four persons.

PASS CARDS. Through the kind liberality of the French Govern. ment this will be a perfect protection to you while in Paris and also admit you to various sights and exhibitions, which under ordinary circumstances are only open on certain days. For the honour of your country, and the preservation of your own respectability it is ardently desired that in no one instance will this confidence and generosity in British subjects be abused.

The rendez-vous or office for the Party will be the Hôtel des Princes, Rue Richelieu, where I shall be in constant attendance to give any and every information in my power, and, as far as I am able, to consult the wishes of my passengers, and have guides ready for parties who may require them, &c. You can also have your letters directed here, and make appointments to meet friends. Also plans for the day will be concocted and explained. I would advise you to call in each morning after breakfast.

FAC-SIMILE OF PASS CARD.

No. 122.

PASS CARD

CRISP's
LONDON TO

PARIS
XCURS.

FOR THE

PARIS EXCURSION PARTY
ON THURSDAY, THE 5TH APRIL, 1849.

COMMITTEE OF SURVEILLANCE.

FRANCIS LLOYD, ESQ.,

J. H. BROWN, ESQ., Beaufort Lodge, Chelsea. Markham Square, Chelsea PHILIP NIND, ESQ.,

CHARLES HIBBLE, ESQ ,
Subloniere Hotel,

2, North Terrace,
Leicester Square.

Mount Gardens,

Westminster Road. B. H. BULLOCK, ESQ.,

For the Committee.
Chester Street,

Belgrave Square. Panlip NIND, Hon: Sec:

JOSEPH CRISP, Contractor.

Indorsed. Name, address and description.

I believe I have now given all the directions neces. sary for the journey, and for further information would refer you to “the Guide Book.” JOSEPH CRISP, Contractor.

457, Strand, London,

AND

Hôtel des Princes, Rue Richelieu, Paris.”

It was expected by some people that the company would have assembled by thousands, but that very circumstance, indicating a crowd, and another conjecture equally prevalent, amongst others, that the whole thing was a hoax, operated injuriously no doubt, and in diminution of the numbers that assembled this morning, who amounted only to 250.

At a quarter to 6, after waiting a few minutes in an apartment appointed for the examination of the tickets, we took our departure by the towns of Reigate and Tonbridge, and through the celebrated, highly cultivated, and well-wooded Weald of Kent. Its general aspect is that of a garden, from the richness of its surface and soil, and the variety of its scenery, especially about Tonbridge Town, where it is truly beautiful. The Weald extends from Romney Marsh to Surrey, being bounded on the north by the Rag-stone

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