Contributions to Economic Geology, 1908: Mineral fuels, Part 2

Front Cover
U.S. Government Printing Office, 1910 - Coal - 559 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 318 - Springs, and it is utilized by the Denver and Rio Grande and the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe railroads.
Page 28 - Water apparently evaporated per pound of coal as fired pounds Water evaporated from and at 212F — Per pound of coal as fired pounds Per pound of dry coal do.
Page 88 - It presents perhaps the most rugged scenery on the Missouri River, the denudation and erosion having been much greater than at the Bad Lands of White River. But the most remarkable feature of this basin is the wonderful disturbance of the strata. So much are the beds disturbed and blended together by forces acting from beneath that it seems almost hopeless to obtain a section showing with perfect accuracy the order of superposition of the different strata.
Page 363 - Sandstone. Ft. in. Shale 1 Coal 2 6 Shale 3 Coal 1 2 Shale 2 5 Sandstone. Coal bed... . .. . 3 11 About 200 feet west of the Royal Gorge bed Mr. Bettis has sunk a prospect shaft 95 feet deep in which a bed of coal 3 feet thick is said to have been struck at a depth of 75 feet. This is presumably the Nonac bed. The method of working the two coal beds in the Royal Gorge mines is interesting, because the beds are separated by only 5 to 7 feet of rock of moderate strength, of which more than half is...
Page 219 - ... between the Black Buttes and the Black Rock coal groups, probably extending around the dome in a belt that is somewhat concentric with those of the other groups. The Black Rock coal group lies unconformably upon the Black Buttes and older coal groups and like them outcrops around the dome more or less concentrically with the others. In places this group conceals wholly or in part the underlying group. By far the most pronounced unconformity observed in the field occurs at its base. The Black...
Page 266 - ... sec. 7, T. 19 N., R. 104 W. The bed south of the fault has moved up 12 feet. Several smaller faults and many slickensides were observed in the mine, but these do not interfere with mining. Union Pacific Coal Company's mine No. 8. — Mine No. 8, which is connected with Nos. 7, 9, and 10, was opened in 1889 and is still in active operation. It is worked through a triple-compartment vertical shaft 180 feet deep. The coal is not screened or assorted. A single-track entry 14,000 feet long connects...
Page 218 - The three largest tributaries of Bitter Creek — Killpecker, Little Bitter, and Salt Wells creeks — have been shaped indirectly by the fold. On account of the difference in the hardness of the beds these valleys extend in the main along the strike of the beds and are approximately at right angles to Bitter Creek. In some places, as in the valleys of Salt Wells and Black Buttes creeks, the small streams cut across several of the ridges before joining the main stream, and one of the tributaries...
Page 140 - The water is deep and intensely alkaline, and there is neither inlet nor outlet as the little creek which is crossed before reaching the lake passes by the west end at a few hundred yards distance, and turns westward to the Piney Forks, emptying its stream below their...
Page 246 - Wyoming. BURNING OF OUTCROP. In the western coal fields many coal beds have been burned along their outcrop, and in a few places the burning is going on at the present time. The extent of the burning is in general inversely proportional to the value of the coal. In the Rock Springs field the amount of burning is relatively small in the Rock Springs and Almond coal groups and a little more prominent in each of the other coal groups, being most pronounced in the Black Rock. Considering the amount of...
Page 217 - The most prominent stream in this field is Bitter Creek, which controls the major part of the drainage of the dome. It flows across the central portion of the dome at nearly right angles to the major axis and has carved a broad valley along which the Union Pacific Railroad is constructed.

Bibliographic information