The New Art of Memory: Founded Upon the Principles Taught by M. Gregor Von Feinaigle: and Applied to Chronology, History, Geography, Languages, Systematic Tables, Poetry, Prose, and Arithmetic. To which is Added, Some Account of the Principal Systems of Artificial Memory, from the Earliest Period to the Present Time; with Instances of the Extraordinary Powers of Natural Memory ...

Cover
R. Edwards, 1813 - 467 Seiten
 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite 169 - TURN, gentle Hermit of the dale, And guide my lonely way To where yon taper cheers the vale With hospitable ray. " For here forlorn and lost I tread, With fainting steps and slow; Where wilds, immeasurably spread, Seem lengthening as I go." " Forbear, my son," the Hermit cries, " To tempt the dangerous gloom ; For yonder faithless phantom flies To lure thee to thy doom.
Seite 1 - ... this difference, that in some it retains the characters drawn on it like marble, in others like free-stone, and in others little better than sand, I shall not here inquire: though it may seem probable that the constitution of the body does sometimes influence the memory; since we oftentimes find a disease quite strip the mind of all its ideas, and the flames of a fever in a few days calcine all those images to dust and confusion, which seemed to be as lasting as if graved in marble.
Seite 446 - ... much attracted the attention, and excited the astonishment, of every person who has witnessed his extraordinary abilities. The discovery was made by accident. His father, who had not given him any other instruction than such as was to be obtained at a small school established in that unfrequented and remote part of the country (and which did not include either writing or ciphering), was much surprised one day to hear him repeating the products of several numbers.
Seite 1 - Thus the ideas, as well as children, of our youth often die before us : and our minds represent to us those tombs to which we are approaching ; where though the brass and marble remain, yet the inscriptions are effaced by time, and the imagery moulders away.
Seite 449 - ... not always with equal facility ; for the larger the products became, the more difficult he found it to proceed. He was asked the square root of 106,929; and before the number could be written down, he immediately answered, 327. He was then required to name the cube root of 268,336,125; and with equal facility and promptness he replied, 645.
Seite 417 - Your worships have thought fit to sequester an honest poor but cavalier parson, my neighbour, from his living, and committed him to prison ; he has a great charge of children, and his circumstances are but indifferent ; if you please to release him out of prison and restore him to his living, I will never forget the kindness while I live.
Seite 33 - Places and things which have an association with any of the events or feelings of past life, will greatly assist the recollection of them. A man of strong associations finds memoirs of himself already written on the places where he has conversed with happiness or misery. If an old man wished to animate for a moment the languid and faded ideas which he retains of his youth, he might walk with his crutch across the green where he once played with companions who are now probably laid to repose in another...
Seite 113 - Of these reformers some have endeavoured to accommodate orthography better to the pronunciation, without considering that this is to measure by a shadow, to take that for a model or standard which is changing while they apply it.
Seite 118 - Thus the g has no longer two different sounds, which occasioned confusion, but is, as every letter ought to be, confined to one. The same is to be observed in all the letters, vowels, and consonants, that wherever they are met with, or in whatever company, their sound is always the same. It is also intended, that there be no superfluous letters used in spelling ; that is, no letter that is not sounded ; and this alphabet, by six new letters, provides, that there be no distinct sounds in the language...
Seite 1 - How much the constitution of our bodies, and the make of our animal spirits, are concerned in this ; and whether the temper of the brain makes this difference, that in some it retains the characters drawn on it like marble, in others like free-stone, and in others little better than sand, I shall not here inquire...

Bibliografische Informationen