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ferve the Lord, at the close of the recapitulation of such signal and aftonishing mercies as GOD had wrought for Israel appear by the virtue of contrast to be a moft odious and intolerable ingratitude: and what foul is there but what must abhor and execrate the thought of its being evil to serve the Lord, that but just before has heard a distinct and full recital of the wonders of

power and goodness on its behalf?. May not fuch a kind of address be justly ftiled, " Drawing us ss with the cords of a man, and with the bands ss of love ?" Hofea xi. 4.

CHAPTER XII.

The EPANAPHOR A considered..

$ 1. The definition of an Epanaphora. $ 2. InStances from Prior, VIRGIL, and CICERO. $ 3. Examples from Scripture. $ 4. The Epaa naphora adapted to express lively and violent passions, with instances. $ 5. This Figure of service in infifting upon any topic. § 6. Caution in the use of the Epanaphora.

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E
Panaphora * is a Figure, in which the
fame word is gracefully and emphati-

cally * From "Tw&pagw, I repeat.

cally repeated; or in which distinct fentences, or the several members of the same sentence, are be-a gun with the same word.

§ 2. We have a beautiful instance of this Figure in the following lines of Mr Prior's Poem, intitled, Henry and Emma.

Are there not poisons, racks, and Aames, and fwords,
: That EMMA thus must die by Henry's words?
Yet what could swords, or poifon, racks, or flames,
But mangle and disjoint this, brittle frame?,
More fatal Henry's words, they murder Emma's

fame.

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Virgil furnishes us, with an example of this
Figure, when he says,
Here are cool fountains, here are velvet meads;

Here the young groves are twisted into bow'rs:
Here, here, O how could I enjoy with thee

My life, delighted to its latest hour t! : We have an Epanaphora in the following pasfage from Cicero:“ What is so popular as

peace? in which not only beings endowed “ with sense, but even our dwellings and fields « seem to rejoice. What is so popular as li. “ berey? It is not only the desire of men, but « even of brutes; and is preferred by thein to « all things beside. What is so popular as ease « and leisure ? for the sake of whose enjoyment,

cc both - + Hic gelidi fontes, hic mollia prata, Lycori; Hic nemus, hic ipfo tecum consumerer ævo.

VIRGIL. Eclog. x. ver. 42.

« both you and your ancestors, and indeed every “ brave man have judged, and still judge, that " the greatest labours are to be endured *.'

SS

$ 3. We may produce instances of this Figure, from the sacred Writings. Deut. viii. 3. Blesss ed shalt thou be in the city, and blessed shalt ss thou be in the field : blessed shall be the fruit " of thy body, and the fruit of thy ground, and ss the fruit of thy cattle, the increase of thy kine, ss and the flocks of thy sheep: blessed shall be

thy basket, and thy store : blessed shalt thou ss be when thou comest in, and blessed shalt thou ss be when thou goest out." In like manner, Psalm xxix. 4. * The voice of the Lord is

powerss ful; the voice of the Lord is full of majesty : ss the voice of the Lord breaks the cedars; yea, ss the Lord breaks the cedars of Lebanon. The ss voice of the Lord divides the flames of fire : ss the voice of the Lord shakes the wilderness; ss the LORD shakes the wilderness of Kadesh. 5: The voice of the LORD makes the hinds to calve, and discovers the forests.ss

But

SS

• Quid enim eft tam populare, quàm pax ? qua non modo ii, quibus natura sensum dedit, fed etiam tecta, atque agri mihi lætari videntur. Quid tam populare, quàm libertas! quam non folùm ab hominibus, verum etiam à beftiis expeti, atque omnibus rebus anteponi videtur. Quid tam populare, quàm otium ? quod ita jucundum est, ut & vos, & majores vestri, & fortiffimus quisque vir, maximos labores suscipiendos putet, ut aliquando in otio poffit 'esse. CICER, contra RULL. Orat. ii. n 4.

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cally repeated; or in which distinct sentences, or the several members of the same sentence, are begun with the same word.

$ 2. We have a beautiful instance of this Figure in the following lines of Mr Prior's Poem, intitled, Henry and Emma.

Are there not poisons, racks, and Aames, and swords,
: That EMMA thus muft die by Henry's words?
Yet what could swords, or poifon, racks, or flames,
But mangle and disjoint this brittle frame?
More fatal HENRY's words, they murder EMMA's

fame.

Virgil furnishes us with an example of this
Figure, when he says,
Here are cool fountains, here are velvet meads;

Here the young groves are twisted into bow'rs:
Here, here, O how could I enjoy with thee

My life, delighted to its latest hour t! We have an Epanaphora in the following pasfage from Cicero: “ What is so popular as

peace? in which not only beings endowed “ with sense, but even our dwellings and fields « seem to rejoice. What is so popular as li“ berry? It is not only the desire of men, but " even of brutes; and is preferred by them to « all things beside. What is so popular as ease « and leisure ? for the sake of whose enjoyment,

6 both + Hic gelidi fontes, hic mollia prata, Lycori; Hic nemus, hic ipfo tecum consumerer ævo.

VIRGIL. Eclog. x. ver. 42.

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« both your ancestors, and indeed every “ brave man have judged, and still judge, that " the greatest labours are to be endured *.”

you and

$ 3. We may produce instances of this Figure , from the sacred Writings. Deut. viii. 3. s Blessss ed shalt thou be in the city, and blessed shalt ss thou be in the field: blessed shall be the fruit "s of thy body, and the fruit of thy ground, and ss the fruit of thy cattle, the increase of thy kine, ss and the flocks of thy sheep: blessed shall be

thy basket, and thy store : blessed shalt thou s be when thou comest in, and blessed shalt thou ss be when thou goeft out." In like manner, Psalm xxix. 4. " The voice of the Lord is power

ful; the voice of the Lord is full of majesty : ss the voice of the Lord breaks the cedars; yea, ss the LORD breaks the cedars of Lebanon. The ss voice of the LORD divides the flames of fire : ss the voice of the LORD shakes the wilderness; ss the Lord shakes the wilderness of Kadesh. ss The voice of the Lord makes the hinds to calve, and discovers the forests.s

But

SS

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SS

• Quid enim eft tam populare, quàm pax ? qua non modo ii, quibus natura sensum dedit, fed etiam tecta, atque agri mihi lætari videntur. Quid tam populare, quàm libertas ? quam non solùm ab hominibus, verum etiam à beftiis expeti, atque omnibus rebus anteponi videtur. Quid tam populare, quàm otium ? quod ita jucundum est, ut & vos, & majores veftri, & fortiffimus quisque vir, maximos labores fufcipiendos putet, ut aliquando in otio poflit esse. Cicer, contra RULL, Orat. ii. n 4.

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