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For the divine Deliverer
Will on his march in majesty appear,
And needs the aid of no confed’rate pow'r *.

“ There is yet one evil more, says the Speed16 tor, which I must take notice of, and that is ti the running of Metaphors into tedious Alle« gories. This becomes abominable when the « luftre of one word leads a Writer out of his

road, and makes him wander from his subject “ for a page together t.” Excellent is the direction of CICERO, “ that in all things we should « consider how far we may go; for although there " is a measure to every thing, yet excess offends

more than defect !!.” The moment we begin to sport with a Metaphor, and needlessly extend it, nature's grand and striking energy and beauties vanish, and art appears weak and enervate art, and rather produces disgust than entertainment.

How much better had it been for that Preacher to have kept himself to the idea of a fun of righteousness, to which the Saviour of the world is compared, Mal. iv. 2. and shewn in what respects the natural fun might afford a resemblance of him, than to have lanched out into that learned, trifling, and impertinent superfluity of Mecaphor, which is ascribed to him when he is represented as saying,

" that CHRIST was a mercy truly zo

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* Vol. vi. p. 192, 193.
+ Spezlator, Vol. viïi. N° 595.

| In omnibus rebus videndum eft quatenus. Etfi enim saus cuique modus est, tamen magis offendit nimium quam parun.

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he divine Deliverer on his march in majesty appear, needs the aid of no confed'rate pow's *. There is yet one evil more, says the Speald", which I must take notice of, and that is - running of Metaphors into tedious Alleries. This becomes abominable when the itre of one word leads a Writer out of his sad, and makes him wander from his subje& or a page together +.” Excellent is the diion of CICERO, “ that in all things we should consider how far we may go; for although there is a measure to every thing, yet excess offends more than defect y.” The moment we begin sport with a Metaphor, and needlessly extend

nature's grand and striking energy and beau's vanish, and art appears weak and enervate 't, and rather produces disgust than entertain

How much better had it been for that Preacher have kept himself to the idea of a fun of righafness, to which the Saviour of the world is mpared, Mal. iv. 2. and Thewn in what respects e natural fun might afford a resemblance of im, than to have lanched out into that learned, ifling, and impertinent superfluity of Metaphor, hich is ascribed to him when he is represented saying, that CHRIST was a mercy truly zo

diacal; • Vol.si. p. 192, 193. + Speaater, Vol. viji. N° 595.

In omnibus rebus videndum eft quatenus. Etfi enin saus que modes eít, tamen magis offendit nimium quam parum. diacal; for Christ always keeps within the “ tropics: He goes not out of the pale of the “ Church, but yet he is not always at the same “ distance from a true Chriftian ; sometimes he “ withdraws himself into the apogeum of doubt, “ forrow and despair, but then he comes again « into the perigeum of joy, content, and assur« ance; but as for Heathens and Unbelievers, " they are all aretic and antaretic reprobates ?”

$ 15. It may be a very proper caution that we should not interpret Metaphors in such a manner, as if all the affections and properties of the things expressed by them might be ascribed to thofe things to which they are applied ; or, in other words, we should not strain a Comparison, which has usually but one particular view, in order to make it agree in other respects, where it is evident there is not a similitude of ideas. CICERO calls Mark ANTONY the torch of the state *. The resemblance intended by Cicero between ANTONY and a torch lay in this; that as a torch burns and destroys every thing within its reach, so Antony spread devastation and ruin through the Roman commonwealth. Was any person from hence to infer, that because a torch enlightens as well as burns, that therefore Cicero

signed this Metaphor as a compliment to AnTony, he could not more grossly abuse and wrest the Orator's meaning. It is said, Ifaiah

xl. • Sed quæ provincia eft, ex qua illa fax excitare non poffet incendium. Phil. 7: $.

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xl. 6. that all flesh is grass ;" that is, all mankind are liable to wither and decay, and will wither and decay like the grass : but this Metaphor would be tortured to a meaning, which, as it is foolish and absurd, we may be sure was never intended by the inspired Writer, if we were to say, that mankind were like the grass, or were grass in colour or shape. What wild, and indeed wicked abuse, would be made of the Scripture expressions concerning our Lord*, “ that he will come as a thief," if we were not to confine the sense to the suddennefs and surprisal of the thief, but should extend it to the temper and designs of the villain that breaks open houses in the night?

A Minister, speaking on the one side of the unsuitablenefs of sínners to the holy enjoyments of Heaven, could it be supposed that they were admitted there, and, on the other hand, of the fitness of the truly pious for the fruitions of the celestial state, compared the minds of sinners and the celestial happiness to water and fire which could not be united, while he resembled the temper of the pious to wood and fire which easily mingle together, and at length fo intirely, that the first is totally penetrated and possessed by the last. After the Minister had ended his discourse, one of his audience objected against the comparison as not just, because wood was consumed by fire; whereas the sole intention of the Minister was to avail himself of the agreement in nature between wood and fire, and there was no design

E?? * Rev. xvi. 15.

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