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THE GENERAL NATURE OF . TROPES .CONSIDERED.

$1. The definition of a Trope. $ 2. Tropes may extend to Sentences as well as Words. § 3. The true difference between Tropes and Figures. $ 4. Tropes may become faulty. § 5. They may be fown too thick. $ 6. They may be wild and extravagant. $ 7. They may . be mean and low. $ 8. They may be far-fetched - and obscure. $ 9. They may be barsb and un

suitable. $ 10. They may be finical and fantas. tic. $ 11. They may be filthy and impure : all

of which faults are to be carefully avoided, $ 12. A method to discover the value of Tropes; and an observation concerning the purposes for which they are used.

con

$1. Trope * is the changing a word or fen

tence with advantage, from its proper

Signification to another meaning. Thus, for example, God is a Rock t. Here the

B

Trope * Derived from teenw, I surn. † 2 Sam. xxiii. 3. The Rock of Israel spake to me, &c.

Trope lies in the word Rock, which is changed from its original sense, as intending one of the strongest works and surest shelters in nature, and is employed to signify that God by his faithfulness and power is the same security to the soul that trusts in him, which the Rock is to the man that builds upon it, or fies for safety to its impenetrable recesses. So our Lord, speaking of HEROD, says, ss Go ye and tell that Fox *.ss Here the word Fox is alienated from its proper meaning, which is that of a beast of prey and of deep čunning, to denote a mischievous or crafty Tyrant, or both. In like manner VIRGIL calls the two Scipio's, Thunderbolts of war; , Or the two Scipios, thunderbolts of war, · That roll’d their ruin o'er the Libyan coasts t.. The word Thunderbolt is not to be understood in its origỉnal sense, but, being transformed into a Trope, signifies the martial terrors, and the rapid and irresistible conquests of those two renowned generals, the SCIPIONES AFRICANI. .

iş 2: A Trope may extend farther than a word, and make up a sentence; or an whole sentence may be tropical. This observation QUINTILIAN juftifies, when he calls a Tropë, “a change of a

cicos. . ..ind.. . word

... * Luke xiii. 32 to Aut geminos duo fulmina belli

Scipiadas, cladem Libyæ Æneid. vi. ver. 842..

call an Hero i Lite 1 Joe D

.8: gle word; but 22. 1. STI the vanity or NS 2. Ii

? Ethiopian muz 1 4 15 or herioning போக EST LE EIA E 'கட்ட fentences, Subitava de are tropical.

$ 3. The true distinc ca e s Figures may be easily conceri i change of a word or senseece Home into another, which its very

e a t ons; whereas it is the nature of a Fiere 2013 dage the sense of words, but to illuftraz, e ten, ennoble, or in fome manner or another bellish our discourses: and so far, and so far ocks, as the words are changed into a different meaning from that which they originally signity, the Orator is obliged to the Tropes, and not to che Figures of Rbetoric.

94. As Tropes infufe a dignity into our language, and fhed a luftre over our expressions, when they are well-chofen and applied; so, on the other hand, when they are mean in themselves, when they are thrown out without judgment, or are in any other respect defective and faulty, they B 2

render

* Tropas eft verbi vel sermonis à propria lig! 2am cum virtute mutatio. Quintil. lib. viil.

fermonis à propria fignificatione in

"ib. lib. viii. cap. 6. ab

CORRECTIONS..

read Svros. - illuminatam,

Ilice. Claudiani. bond.

P. 13. 1.15. for Syrtes
P. 30. 1.40. - illuminacum
P.255. 1.20. Hic
P.256. 1.39. Claudiano
P.270.

bonds
P.:75. 1. 5. - gens
P.295. 1. efface
P.317. 1.19. fnowy fleece
P.317. 1.20. diitaff
P.323. 1.15. uxor
P. 324. l.21. plain
P.325. 1. 8. υπερ-αλλεs2
P.328. 11. - goats
P.403. I. s. - a million
P.469. I. 2. - night

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CHAPTER I.

THE GENERAL NATURE OF TROPES

CONSIDERED.

$ 1. The definition of a Trope. $. 2. Tropes may extend to Sentences as well as Words. $ 3. The true difference between Tropes and Figures. § 4. Tropes may become faulty. $ 5. They may be sown too thick. $ 6. They may be wild and extravagant. $ 7. They may be mean and low. $ 8. They may be far-fetched and obscure. $ 9. They may be harsh and unSuitable. 10. They may be finical and fantastic. $ 11. They may be filtby, and impure: all of which faults are to be carefully avoided. $ 12. A method to discover the value of Tropes; and an observation concerning the purposes for which they are used.. .

$1. Trope * is the changing a word or fenA tence with advantage, from its proper

Signification to another meaning. Thus, for example, God is a Rock t. Here the

в

Trofe * Derived from teenw, I surn. † 2 Sam. xxiii. 3. I be Rock of Israel spake to me, &c.

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