Scottish Field Sports: A Volume of Mingled Gossip and Instruction

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T. Murray, 1861 - 232 Seiten
 

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Seite 32 - This guest of summer, The temple-haunting martlet, does approve, By his loved mansionry, that the heaven's breath Smells wooingly here. No jutty, frieze, Buttress, nor coign of vantage, but this bird Hath made his pendent bed and procreant cradle. Where they most breed and haunt, I have observed, The air is delicate.
Seite 191 - No sun — no moon! No morn — no noon — No dawn — no dusk — no proper time of day — No sky — no earthly view — No distance looking blue — No road — no street — no "t'other side the way...
Seite 66 - There methinks would be enjoyment more than in this march of mind, In the steamship, in the railway, in the thoughts that shake mankind.
Seite 175 - He reads much; He is a great observer, and he looks Quite through the deeds of men ; he loves no plays As thou dost, Antony ; he hears no music ; Seldom he smiles, and smiles in such a sort, As if he mock'd himself and scorn'd his spirit That could be moved to smile at any thing.
Seite 196 - Some the style Infatuates, and through labyrinths and wilds Of error leads them, by a tune entranced. While sloth seduces more, too weak to bear The insupportable fatigue of thought, And swallowing therefore without pause or choice The total grist unsifted, husks and all.
Seite 9 - And lastly came cold February, sitting In an old wagon, for he could not ride, Drawne of two fishes, for the season fitting, Which through the flood before did softly slyde And swim away : yet had he by his side His plough and harnesse fit to till the ground, And tooles to prune the trees, before the pride Of hasting Prime did make them burgein round.
Seite 109 - The sixt was August, being rich arrayd In garment all of gold downe to the ground; Yet rode he not, but led a lovely Mayd Forth by the lilly hand, the which was cround With...
Seite 196 - Knowledge and Wisdom, far from being one, Have oft-times no connection. Knowledge dwells In heads replete with thoughts of other men ; Wisdom in minds attentive to their own. Knowledge, a rude, unprofitable mass, The mere materials with which Wisdom builds, Till smoothed and squared, and fitted to its place, Does but encumber whom it seems to enrich. Knowledge is proud that he has learned so much ; Wisdom is humble that he knows no more.
Seite 156 - To bend with apples the moss'd cottage-trees, And fill all fruit with ripeness to the core; To swell the gourd, and plump the hazel shells With a sweet kernel; to set budding more, And still more, later flowers for the bees, Until they think warm days will never cease, For Summer has...
Seite 63 - All in greene leaves, as he a player were; Yet in his time he wrought as well as playd, That by his plough-yrons mote right well appeare...

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