Self Knowledge: A Treatise, Shewing the Nature and Benefit of that Important Science, and the Way to Attain It. Intermixed with Various Reflections and Observations on Human Nature

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Samuel T. Armstrong, 1809 - 211 Seiten
 

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Inhalt

I
19
II
29
III
36
IV
48
VI
52
VII
54
IX
57
X
62
XXX
134
XXXII
137
XXXIV
140
XXXVI
142
XXXVII
146
XXXIX
148
XL
151
XLI
152

XII
66
XIII
79
XIV
85
XV
87
XVII
91
XVIII
97
XIX
111
XX
115
XXI
120
XXII
122
XXIV
126
XXVI
130
XXVIII
131
XLIII
155
XLV
158
XLVI
161
XLVIII
176
XLIX
178
LI
182
LII
184
LIII
187
LV
189
LVI
194
LVIII
197
LX
205

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Beliebte Passagen

Seite 118 - We then that are strong ought to bear the infirmities of the weak, and not to please ourselves. Let every one of us please his neighbour for his good to edification.
Seite 90 - Woe to him that coveteth an evil covetousness to his house, that he may set his nest on high, that he may be delivered from the power of evil!
Seite 62 - The whole employ of body and of mind. All spread their charms, but charm not all alike; On...
Seite 179 - An adversary, on the contrary, makes a stricter search into us, discovers every flaw and imperfection in our tempers, and though his malice may set them in too strong a light, it has generally some ground for what it advances. A friend exaggerates a man's virtues ; an enemy inflames his crimes. A wise man should give a just attention to both of them, so far as they may tend to the improvement of the one and the diminution of the other.
Seite 56 - A wise man hath his foibles, as well as a fool. But the difference between them is, that the foibles of the one are known to himself, and concealed from the world ; the foibles of the other are known to the world, and concealed from himself.
Seite 82 - In these and the like cases, a man's judgment is easily perverted, and a wrong bias hung upon his mind. These are the inlets of prejudice, the unguarded avenues of the mind, by which a thousand errors and secret faults find admission, without being observed or taken notice of.
Seite 135 - Or how wilt thou say to thy brother, "Let me pull out the mote out of thine eye," and behold, a beam is in thine own eye? Thou hypocrite, first cast out the beam out of thine own eye; and then shalt thou see clearly to cast out the mote out of thy brother's eye.
Seite 190 - When you are angry answer not till you have repeated the fifth petition of the Lord's prayer : — " Forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive them that trespass against us...
Seite 180 - ... we should consider on the other hand how far we. may deserve the praises and approbations which the world bestow upon us ; whether the actions they celebrate proceed from laudable and worthy motives ; and how far we are really possessed of the virtues which gain us applause among those with whom we converse.
Seite xii - It was the observation of a great divine and reformer, that he w/io acquires his learning at the expense of his morals, is the worse for his education. And we may add, that he who does not improve his temper, together with his understanding, is not much the better for it. For he ought to measure his progress in science by the improvement of his morals ; and remember that he is no further a learned man than he is a wise and good man ; and that he cannot be a finished philosopher till he. is a Christian.

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